News

Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson

A coastal researcher from the Crystal Coast was recently honored for his work on developing and improving ways to count fish populations.        

State archaeologists now have more detailed sonar images to study of the Civil War blockade runner Agnes E. Fry. George Olsen has more.

Veterans Today

One of the hardest jobs veterans have in Eastern North Carolina is – finding a job.  Hundreds of thousands of Veterans in the state still couldn’t find jobs in 2015, though the unemployment rate fell sharply from the previous year.Government and private sector initiatives have been established to solve the unemployment problem among the veteran population with some success. But as Chris Thomas reports, hiring men and women who served the nation in combat is still a hard sell.

This week on the Down East Journal, what North Carolina is doing to retain service members after they transition out of the military.  We speak with locals about the struggles, triumphs, and opportunities veterans face entering the private sector. Plus, we reveal the long history of an Oriental landmark turning 70 this year.  And, the North Carolina Symphony is performing their "April In Paris" concert in downtown New Bern on Sunday.

Contributed Photo

 On the corner of Broad and Church Streets in Oriental stands a venue for the performing arts and entertainment.  In the days of Frank Sinatra, Fred Astaire and Bing Crosby, it was known as the Mart.  Today, we call it the Old Theater.  On May 13-14th, there was a celebration of the landmark’s 70th anniversary with live music and old timers reminiscing about the theater’s varied history. 

In the ever constant tug of war between development and environmental concerns on North Carolina’s Outer Banks both sides could almost certainly agree that no matter the state of things now they’re certainly better than one vision for the area around 1950.

   (Reads from NC 12: Gateway to the Outer Banks)

This week on the Down East Journal, a school house for African American children on the Outer Banks once facing demolition may now become a museum and store, paying tribute to the community's past. We talk to the new building owner about future plans to renovate a Rosenwald School in Currituck County.  Plus, it was a loud, fierce competition as high school student teams from across the country faced off in Morehead City for the National Ocean Sciences Bowl.

NCDOT

The NC 11 bridge over Buckskin Swamp and Grove Creek in Kenansville will be shut down for more than a week as crews make the span safe again.  Both north and southbound lanes are closed to all traffic as North Carolina Department of Transportation crews repair the bridge’s substructure which was damaged by recent rain events.  Communications Officer for Divisions 2 and 3 Brian Rick says they noticed the problem during a biannual inspection.

Former Schoolhouse In Currituck County Gets Second Chance

Apr 29, 2016
My Outer Banks Home Magazine

Nearly 100 years ago, residents of Currituck County rallied to build a school for the underserved African-American population. Recently, residents of the same community chose to save the dilapidated structure from destruction.  Chris Thomas reports.

How do you make the best out of a bad situation?

In the old Coinjock Colored School’s case, the answer seems to be “move it about a mile down the road.”

“Man, let me tell ya, you want to talk about remarkable engineering and some really, really, fascinating things to see."

Scott Taylor Photography, Inc

  What is a typical rate of upwelling in eastern boundary current regions in meters per day?  

That’s just an example of the types of questions high school teams had to answer at this year’s National Ocean Sciences Bowl held at the Crystal Coast.  

Attorney General Roy Cooper filed a lawsuit Tuesday against leaders of a Kinston charter school over the mishandling of public funds.  The complaint filed in Wake County Superior Court alleges CEO Ozie Hall, and the Chair of its Board Demyra McDonald-Hall falsely inflated the number of students Kinston Charter Academy would enroll so they could get more tax dollars, even though they knew the school would not be able to stay open for the 2013-2014 term.

Wolf Haven International

Federal and state officials are asking for assistance in the investigation of a red wolf death last fall.  A federally-protected red wolf was found dead Nov. 12 in Hyde County. Based on the condition of the body and other evidence, the actual date of death is estimated to be Oct. 31. The necropsy results recently received indicate the cause of death was gunshot. Anyone with information is being asked to contact the U.S.

Free download of It's Political from the CD War & Peace by Shannon Labrie, currently featured on The Sound.  Find out more about the artist here.

Millions of dollars in economic loss are being attributed to House Bill 2.  This week on the Down East Journal, we explore potential losses for eastern North Carolina.  Plus, the local five sided beach treasure Fort Macon hosts the North Carolina State Park Centennial Celebration at the Crystal Coast this weekend.  And, the New York Theatre Ballet gives a free performance in Edgecombe County next Thursday.  The innovative chamber ballet company performs classical and contemporary dance as well as a premiere of a new dance in celebration of Tarboro native Hobson Pittman's paintings.

Friends of Fort Macon

As the sentinel of Beaufort Inlet and protector of the Crystal Coast, Fort Macon has stood weathering storms on the southern Outer Banks for nearly 200 years.  Since then, the five sided fortress has been converted into a popular state park and now draws more than a million people from around the world each year. Superintendent at Fort Macon State Park Randy Newman.

ENC Split Over HB2 as Tourism Season Begins

Apr 22, 2016
Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina

It's been nearly a month since House Bill 2 became law, but economic, political and social fallout continues.  Demonstrations for and against the law- from prayer rallies to boycotts- have created a thick cloud of controversy and anxiety, but it also raises questions.  Among them - how has House Bill 2 affected lives in eastern North Carolina?  How have local communities responded to it?  Chris Thomas seeks answers to those questions in this report.

Duke Energy CEO Talks Past Spills, Future Projects

Apr 19, 2016
East Carolina University News Services

Duke Energy Progress is still under intense scrutiny over the 2014 coal ash spill in the Dan River and, now, for its part in the construction of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which is scheduled to run along the I-95 corridor in North Carolina.

This week, Duke Energy Progress CEO Lynn Good came to Greenville and spoke to business students at East Carolina University.

Laura Taylor, Center of Environmental and Resources Economic Policy at NCSU

Imagine you’re at the beach.  The sun, the sand and wind turbines?   This could soon be the reality along the coast of North Carolina.  As the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management moves forward with leasing thousands of acres to utility scale wind energy developers, dozens of 500 foot tall turbines could soon be built offshore.  Even though the technology would produce clean, renewable power, there are some downsides to wind farms, most noticeably aesthetics. 

Wind energy at our coast could be a renewable source of electricity for us, but it has some potential pitfalls, especially when it comes to tourism.  This week on the Down East Journal, we talk to a NC State University researcher about a new study that finds offshore wind farms could negatively impact coastal economies.  And, we speak to Duke Energy Progress CEO Lynn Good about energy projects currently underway in eastern North Carolina, including the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and solar facilities.

NASA

On the monthly "Carolina Skies" segment, we talk about what you can spot in eastern North Carolina's night sky, from constellations and planets to nebulas and galaxies.  Our host is Byron Mumaw, president of the Carolina Skies Astronomy Club.  This week, we focus on the fifth planet from our sun and one of the brightest objects right now in the night sky, Jupiter.

National Baseball Hall of Fame

The Major League Baseball began this week – joining the local season that started nearly two months ago in Eastern North Carolina. With the start of baseball season in Eastern North Carolina it comes traditions spanning more than a century.

The National Past-Time’s seemingly waning popularity is a popular topic of debate among sports fans and experts. But as Chris Thomas reports, baseball is still alive and strong in the region – even after losing one of its long-standing teams.>>>

This week on the Down East Journal, an unlikely partnership between a scientist and a fisherman has developed to solve a critical environmental and economic issue along the North Carolina coast.  And, baseball's past, present  and future here in eastern North Carolina.

From a gas station to a "glass station," eastern North Carolina is in for some hot art.  The town of Farmville is the future location for a hand blown glass studio.  Plus, local reaction to House Bill 2.  And, what's in store for the Oriental In-Water Boat Show next weekend.

UNC Research

There’s an environmental and economic crisis along our coast and around the world.  Oyster populations are drastically low, as compared to their numbers a century ago.  In North Carolina, oyster populations have dropped 90 percent.  But two men in Carteret County think they may have the answer to the shortage.  One is a scientist, the other is a fishermen.

ECU

As more people move to eastern North Carolina to retire or raise families, communities here are undergoing a transformation.  Take downtown areas of New Bern, Greenville and Kinston for example.  These cities have undergone major revitalization and now, boast a variety of independent shops, award winning restaurants, art galleries and craft breweries.  Now, the rural town of Farmville, home to about 5,000 people seeks to become the next creative center and cultural hub in eastern North Carolina.  Todd Edwards is a member of a volunteer association focused on economic development called The

Local politicians, residents weigh in on House Bill 2

Apr 1, 2016
National Public Radio

On March 23, Governor Pat McCrory signed House Bill 2 into law – restricting the power of local governments to pass certain laws: namely, the ability to let transgender people use restrooms based on their gender identity instead of their given sex in certain, government run buildings.  

This came after the City of Charlotte passed an ordinance in February allowing individuals to use restrooms based on their gender identity.

It’s created a stir nationwide and here at home. Chris Thomas has more.

This week on the Down East Journal, the winner of the best national park beach goes to... Cape Lookout National Seashore.  We’ll tell you why it’s so special.  Plus, North Pitt High School Lady’s Basketball team won the 2016 State Championship despite a challenging season that included the suspension of their head coach and two players.  We talk to members of the team about their hard fought victory.  And, the Historic Preservation Group of Lenoir County is looking for volunteers to participate in a local Park Day event on April 2nd.

Cape Lookout National Seashore

We’ve known all along that beaches along the North Carolina coast are the best around.  Now, so does everyone else in the United States.  USA Today named Cape Lookout National Seashore the Best National Park Beach of 2016.  Superintendent Pat Kenney. 

“We actually received an email from USA Today advising us that we had won.”

WITN-TV

As March Madness rages for the national, collegiate championship, 8 high school teams along Tobacco Road were crowned state champions earlier this month.

Two of those in Pitt County.

In the men’s brackets, Farmville Central capped a perfect season by beating East Lincoln High School 81-71 for the 2A crown.  

On the women’s side, North Pitt High School of Bethel clinched a narrow victory against East Davidson High School in Thomasville, also in the 2A division.

INTRO – The names of those involved in a Highway Patrol trooper involved shooting Sunday morning in Kinston have been released.

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