World Cafe
2:00 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Next: Rose Windows

Rose Windows.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:46 pm

Rose Windows' debut album, The Sun Dogs, is steeped in '60s classic rock, recalling the heavy organ sounds of The Doors and the folk-infused flutes of Traffic. Formed in 2010 by songwriter Chris Cheveyo, the Seattle septet signed a label deal earlier this year, then put together an album that's layered with Middle Eastern influences.

Hear two songs from The Sun Dogs, a mellow combination of psychedelic folk and blues-rock instrumentation.

Read more
A Blog Supreme
1:47 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The 2013 Newport Jazz Festival In GIFs

Esperanza Spalding performs at the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Clap your hands now! From Michel Camilo's stomping, tassled Oxfords to Esperanza Spalding's vibrating upright-bass strings and a whole lotta dancing, here's the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival forever enshrined in animated GIFs. See a gallery of Adam Kissick's pixel portraits here — and follow us on Flickr.

Music Reviews
1:35 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Vince Gill And Paul Franklin Ain't 'Foolin' Around' With Bakersfield Sound

Vince Gill (left) and Paul Franklin.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:21 pm

Country-music star Vince Gill and steel guitarist Paul Franklin have teamed up to record a new concept album called Bakersfield. Their idea is to cover hits from the 1960s and '70s by two artists who helped define the Bakersfield, Calif., country sound: Merle Haggard and the Strangers and Buck Owens and the Buckaroos. But this is no nostalgia-fest — it's a vital testament to music that retains energy and innovation.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:32 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Talent Or Skill?: Homing In On The Elusive 'Sports Gene'

According to author David Epstein, hitters like the Los Angeles Angels' Albert Pujols look at the movement of the pitcher's shoulder, torso or hand to help them hit the ball.
Brian Bahr Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:59 pm

We've all had the experience of watching a great athletic performance — from gymnast Mary Lou Retton defying gravity to Michael Jordan sinking a mind-blowing turnaround jumper — and wondered: Were they born with that talent or can you get there with hard work and practice?

Read more
The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Goodbye Earth! What Messenger Saw On Its Way To Mercury

Earth as seen by the Messenger spacecraft.
NASA

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:48 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
1:17 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

15 Years Later, Tawana Brawley Has Paid 1 Percent Of Penalty

Tawana Brawley, with the Rev. Al Sharpton, in 1988.
Mark Elias AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:32 pm

It was 1987 when a black teenager, Tawana Brawley, said she had been raped and kidnapped by a group of white men in Dutchess County, N.Y.

Her story of being attacked, scrawled with racial slurs, smeared with feces and left beside a road wrapped in a plastic bag made front pages across the nation — especially after the Rev. Al Sharpton took up her case.

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:03 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The Effort To Write Laws For Your Digital Life After Death

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:21 pm

Time was when the belongings you left behind after death were tangible — furniture, jewelry, letters — and financial property, which hundreds of years of experience have taught executors how to handle. Today, some of the most valuable keys to our lives and identities exist digitally, and are technically owned by companies like Google or Facebook.

For the digital assets stored on shared servers in the cloud, legal systems have yet to catch up to help decide who controls your data when you're dead. And uniform laws around control of these assets could help.

Read more
Parallels
12:49 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

World War II Researchers Say 'Italian Schindler' Was A Myth

The Risiera di San Sabba in Trieste was used during World War II as the only death camp on Italian soil. In the building's courtyard, the outline on the brick wall is where the crematorium was located.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

A group of Italian researchers who have studied troves of World War II documents have found no evidence that Giovanni Palatucci, a police official long credited as the "Italian Schindler," saved the lives of 5,000 Jews.

The findings are demolishing the Italian national icon and angering supporters of the man who has been honored at Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, and who has been put on the track to sainthood.

'Unfounded' Claims Of Heroism?

Read more
New In Paperback
12:33 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Aug. 5-11: Sleep, Madness And Wild West Mythology

Free Press

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
12:28 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Why India's Next State Is Not Likely To Be The Last

Visitors ride in a carriage at the entrance of the Jewel of the Nizams "Falaknuma Palace," the former residence of Nizam Mehaboob Ali Khan in the old city area of Hyderabad. The legacy of these Muslim rulers — and the disenfranchisement of the Hindu majority — contributed to the economic gap in Andhra Pradesh.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 1:35 pm

India's cartographers may soon be redrawing the country's map. If events go to plan, India will inaugurate Telangana, its 29th state, perhaps as early as next year — casting the spotlight anew on the challenges of governing a country as vast, and with a population as diverse, as India.

Telangana, on the arid Deccan plateau, is due to be carved out of the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India's fifth most populous state, with a population of 85 million.

Read more

Pages