NPR Ed
3:38 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Charter Schools, Money And Test Scores

Putting charter school research under a microscope.
Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:17 pm

The University of Arkansas today released what it calls a "first ever" study exploring the relationship between charter school funding and student achievement.

Read more
Remembrances
3:34 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Fresh Air Remembers Actress And Singer Elaine Stritch

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 12:05 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
3:34 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

How Scientists Created A Typhus Vaccine In A 'Fantastic Laboratory'

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:23 pm

When Germany invaded the Soviet Union during World War II, Nazi commanders had another worry besides the Red Army. Epidemics of typhus fever, which is transmitted by body lice, killed untold numbers of soldiers and civilians during and after World War I.

As World War II raged, typhus reappeared in war-torn areas and in Jewish ghettos, where cramped, harsh conditions were a perfect breeding ground for lice.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:19 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

As High School Lacrosse Surges In Popularity, So Does Injury Focus

Walt Whitman High School's Caroline Schweitzer runs through a host of Severna Park High School defenders during a semifinal game in Maryland's Class 4A/3A lacrosse tournament in May.
Toni L. Sandys The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:42 am

Sometimes called the fastest game on two feet, lacrosse is also one of the fastest-growing sports in the U.S.

Between 2008 and 2012, kids' participation in lacrosse climbed 158 percent to a little more than three-quarters of a million, according to a survey conducted by the Sports & Fitness Industry Association/Physical Activity Council. At the same time participation in baseball, basketball, football and soccer has either stagnated or declined.

Read more
NPR Story
3:18 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Remains Of Clovis Boy Reburied In Montana

During a special ceremony, scientists and representatives of six tribes reburied a 12,600-year-old Clovis child in a patch of sagebrush on Saturday June, 28, 2014, close to the site where he was accidentally unearthed almost 50 years ago. (Shawn Raecke/Livingston Enterprise)

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:13 pm

Earlier this year, Here & Now told the story of the so-called “Clovis boy,” a young boy buried in what is now Montana, more than 12,000 years ago. His remains were discovered there in 1968 and eventually his DNA was analyzed, showing the boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America about 13,000 years ago.

Read more
Goats and Soda
3:17 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Rumor Patrol: No, A Snake In A Bag Did Not Cause Ebola

Eerie protective suits and shiny body bags have fueled rumors about the origins of Ebola. Here, a burial team removes the body of a person suspected to have died from the virus in the village of Pendembu, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:17 pm

"A lady had a snake in a bag. When somebody opened the bag, that made the lady die."

That's the beginning of a story that Temba Morris often hears about the origins of Ebola. Morris runs a government health clinic in a remote village near Sierra Leone's border with Guinea. According to the story, somebody else then looked inside the bag.

"And the one who opened the bag also died," is what Morris hears next. The snake escaped into the Sierra Leone bush.

So there you have it: Ebola is an evil snake that will kill you if you look at it.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Montana Judge Is Publicly Censured Over 30-Day Sentence For Rape

Montana District Judge G. Todd Baugh was publicly censured by the state Supreme Court on Tuesday. The judge apologized for remarks he made about a rape victim last year.
Matt Brown AP

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:00 pm

Less than a year after his lenient jail sentence for an admitted rapist stirred outrage, a Montana judge was publicly reprimanded today. In giving a former high school teacher only a 30-day jail sentence, District Judge G. Todd Baugh said the man's victim, a student, seemed older than her age, 14.

Read more
NPR Story
2:14 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

After Malaysia Airlines Crash, A Closer Look At Planning Flight Paths

The Malaysia Airlines accident is raising a lot of questions about what flights routes airlines take and what restrictions are placed over war zones. (Glenlarson/Wikimedia)

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:13 pm

Airlines continue to avoid Eastern Ukraine after Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down there last week. Some, like Delta, are avoiding all of Ukraine.

There had been warnings issued about flying in the airspace above Eastern Ukraine before the crash, but only up to 32,000 feet. The Malaysia Airlines jet was flying above that, and was only near the restricted space, not in it, when it was shot down.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:05 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

How A Tiny Fly's Ears Could Help You Hear Better

If you were a cricket, this little fly would make you very nervous.
Courtesy of Louisiana State Arthropod Museum

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 8:32 am

Ormia ochracea is not a very likeable creature, even by fly standards.

This parasitic fly likes to leave its larvae on the backs of crickets. The larvae burrow inside the cricket and then proceed to eat the cricket alive.

But humans who have struggled with hearing loss might soon be thankful for at least one small part of this fly — its ears.

Read more
NPR Story
2:04 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Modest, Obscure Deal Has Tech Industry Talking

Yahoo is reportedly set to buy the mobile advertising company Flurry for about $200 million. Pictured is a screenshot of Flurry's homepage. (Flurry.com)

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 4:13 pm

Yahoo is set to buy the mobile advertising company Flurry. It’s a relatively modest deal by Silicon valley standards — reportedly about $200 million — and Flurry is not a company that consumers know or care about, but the deal has the tech industry buzzing.

Peter Kafka of Re/code says that’s because Yahoo is trying to solve a problem that other tech giants are facing — how to increase advertising revenue from mobile ads.

Read more

Pages