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NPR Story
7:54 am
Sat December 27, 2014

King Kong Out To Crush Bigfoot's Claim To Fame As First Monster Truck

Bigfoot 4X4 is a legend in the monster truck world, but another truck is challenging its claim as first car crusher. The bragging rights are big deal in what has become a multibillion-dollar industry.

This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Dec. 23, 2014.

Around the Nation
7:50 am
Sat December 27, 2014

High Electric Bills Gobble Up Savings From Cheap Oil In New England

Falling oil prices are perhaps nowhere more welcome than in northern New England, where most homes burn heating oil in their furnaces and high electricity prices are going up.

This story originally aired on Morning Edition on Dec. 22, 2014.

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U.S.
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Thousands Expected To Attend Funeral Of Slain New York City Officer

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Nonprofit Helps Poor Musicians Keep Instruments Out Of Pawn Shops

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Deceptive Cadence
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Steinway Bids Farewell To Its Historic Hall

The rotunda at the historic Steinway Hall in Manhattan. The building will be torn down to build luxury condominiums.
Steinway & Sons

New York is saying goodbye to another historic building. Steinway Hall, the main showroom for Steinway & Sons pianos, will be moving to a new location, leaving its home of almost 90 years on 57th Street near Carnegie Hall. The first floor has been designated a landmark and will be preserved, while the rest of the building will be torn down to build high-rise luxury condominiums.

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U.S.
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Protests Reflect Real Harm From Police Policies, Organizer Says

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Middle East
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Citing 'Historical Inaccuracies,' Egypt Bans 'Exodus' From Theaters

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Author Asks Why WWI Genocide Still Splits Turks And Armenians

Earlier this year, protestors in Los Angeles called for recognition of, and reparations for, the 1915 Armenian genocide executed by Ottoman Turks.
David McNew Getty Images

Writer Meline Toumani grew up in a tight-knit Armenian community in New Jersey. There, identity centered on commemorating the mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks during World War I, a history that's resulted in tense relations between Armenians and Turks to this day.

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Parallels
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Long Plagued By Corruption, Romania Seeks To Make A Fresh Start

Klaus Iohannis was an underdog who was the surprise winner of Romania's presidential runoff election last month. He was sworn into office on Dec. 21 with a promise to crackdown on corruption, a chronic problem in Romania.
Gabriel Amza for NPR

Romania is one of the poorest and most corrupt countries in Europe and it's been that way for years. It's a tough legacy to overcome, but there are signs the country is trying to make a fresh start.

Klaus Iohannis, an underdog presidential candidate who campaigned on a platform of fighting corruption, won a surprising victory last month over the ruling party's nominee. Iohannis, 55, was sworn into office last Sunday.

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Asia
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Tsunami Survivor: Banda Aceh Is Still Vulnerable

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
7:46 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Former Guantanamo Envoy Says Prison Undermines National Security

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book News & Features
7:03 am
Sat December 27, 2014

All The Writers You Love Probably Love Dorothy Dunnett

iStockphoto.com

The old fiction room at my high school was a small box of wonders, and no matter how long I spent investigating its seven and a half overstuffed shelves, I never stopped discovering treasures. When I was sixteen, the shelf which held authors A through D divulged a small, yellowing paperback with a splashily romantic cover: a long-limbed blond man in Renaissance dress, gripping both a woman and a rapier. The title was The Game of Kings, its author was Dorothy Dunnett, and reading it was going to change my life.

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Goats and Soda
6:59 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Ebola Survivor: The Best Word For The Virus Is 'Aggression'

Dr. Ian Crozier stands with a group of survivors and a nurse at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. He contracted Ebola and was on the brink of death, but he survived.
Courtesy of WHO/J Amone

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 7:46 am

When Dr. Ian Crozier arrived in West Africa this past summer, he was stepping into the epicenter of the Ebola hot zone. The American doctor was working in the Ebola ward of a large, public hospital in Sierra Leone's dusty city of Kenema.

The trip nearly cost him his life. First came a fever, then a severe headache. "My first thought was, 'Oh, I must have missed a few days of my malaria prophylaxis,' " Crozier recalls.

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Code Switch
6:50 am
Sat December 27, 2014

ICYMI 2014: Soccer Field Standoff Highlights Gentrification Tension

Screenshot via YouTube

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 7:46 am

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Parallels
6:34 am
Sat December 27, 2014

With Each New Upheaval In Iraq, More Minorities Flee

An Iraqi Christian prays inside a shrine on the grounds of the Mazar Mar Eillia Catholic Church in Irbil, in northern Iraq. Irbil has become home to hundreds of Iraqi Christians who fled their homes as the Islamic State advanced earlier this year.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 7:46 am

Northern Iraq is a lot more diverse than just Arabs and Kurds or Sunni and Shiite. For centuries, it has been home to multiple religious groups with ancient roots in the region.

But more than a decade of turmoil has driven many religious minorities out, with the most recent example being the onslaught of the self-proclaimed Islamic State militants, or ISIS.

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Author Interviews
6:32 am
Sat December 27, 2014

'The Bishop's Wife' Tracks A Killer In A Mormon Community

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 7:45 am

Writer Mette Ivie Harrison is no stranger to struggles of faith; she says she spent six years as an atheist within the Mormon church.

"It wasn't something that I talked about openly," she tells NPR's Eric Westervelt. "I lost my faith, and I felt like I had made a promise to my husband and my children that I would continue to participate in the Mormon church. So I kept going."

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Music Interviews
6:22 am
Sat December 27, 2014

For Pieta Brown, Music Is A Father-Daughter Dance

"You guys know that road," Pieta Brown told a crowd in Des Moines earlier this month, describing how a row of Iowa warehouses selling fireworks inspired her song "I Don't Mind."
Clay Masters

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 7:46 am

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NPR's 'Jazz Profiles'
6:26 pm
Fri December 26, 2014

Buddy DeFranco: The Clarinetist Who Swung To Bebop

Buddy DeFranco in 1947.
William Gottlieb Library Of Congress

Clarinetist Buddy DeFranco, a brilliant jazz improviser who devised many paths for his instrument following its peak popularity in the swing era, died Dec. 24, his website announced. He was 91.

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NPR Story
6:02 pm
Fri December 26, 2014

Who Was La Malinche?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
6:02 pm
Fri December 26, 2014

Remembering Anthony Quinn

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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