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3:12 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Louis C.K. On Life And Standup: 'I Live In Service For My Kids'

Louis C.K. remembers getting "really big laughs" during his third try at stand-up. "I was so excited that I had a little foot in the door," C.K. says. He's pictured above in his FX series Louie.
KC Bailey FX

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 3:21 pm

After years working the stand-up circuit, Louis C.K. is well established as a comic powerhouse; his FX series Louie is in its fifth season, and C.K. also has a new comedy special that's available as a digital download on his website. But the laughs didn't always come easily. C.K. was a teenager when he first ventured on stage at a local comedy club's open mic night.

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

NFL To End Its Tax-Exempt Status 'To Eliminate ... Distraction'

The National Football League says it's ending its tax-exempt status, calling it a "distraction."

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Shots - Health News
2:59 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

A Rural Police Chief Asks Citizens To Help Pick Up Used Syringes

Volunteer Patrick Pezzati searches yards in Turners Falls, Mass., for discarded heroin needles.
Karen Brown WFCR

Patrick Pezzati walks briskly through downtown Turners Falls in western Massachusetts with a hard plastic bottle in one pocket of his shorts and a pair of latex gloves in the other.

He stops to peer down steps leading to a basement. Later, he peers under a chunk of carpet lying outside.

The local record store owner is scouring the back alleys of this picturesque former mill town for used needles.

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NPR Story
2:25 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Recipes: Healthy Salads With Spring Produce

Fresh ramps, greens and radishes from the farmer's market. (Kathy Gunst)

From asparagus and fava beans to ramps and radishes, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst is reveling in spring produce and thinking of ways to turn it into healthy salads. She shares her ideas with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, along with these four recipes:

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The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

'Go Home. Please': 'Wire' Creator David Simon Urges Calm In Baltimore

David Simon, creator of The Wire, is urging calm in Baltimore.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 4:16 pm

David Simon, creator of The Wire, the HBO show that chronicled the story of Baltimore's police department and its gangs, has appealed for calm in the wake of violence following the funeral Monday of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old black man who died April 19 after he suffered a serious spine injury while in police custody.

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The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

'Criminals' Taking Advantage Of Situation In Baltimore, Obama Says

President Obama is condemning the unrest in Baltimore, saying a handful of "criminals" are taking advantage of the situation following the April 19 death of Freddie Gray.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 3:08 pm

President Obama is condemning the unrest in Baltimore, saying that a handful of "criminals" are taking advantage of the situation following the April 19 death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who suffered a serious spine injury while in police custody.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

How American Tech Giants Are Stepping In To Help Nepal

Nepalese villagers charge their cell phones in an open area in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 27, 2015. (Bernat Armangue/AP)

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 3:24 pm

If you’ve spent any time on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter in recent days, you will likely have noticed special attention given to the massive earthquake in Nepal on Saturday that left more then 5,000 people dead.

That attention goes beyond the phenomenon of global communications. Facebook and Google are making it easier for survivors to be identified, while Apple and PayPal are streamlining the donation process.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Baltimore City Councilman Responds To Unrest

Young children sweep up the area outside the CVS Pharmacy in Baltimore, Maryland, April 28, 2015, that was set on fire during rioting last night. Riot police and National Guard troops stood guard on the smoldering streets of Baltimore Tuesday after protesters incensed by the death of a young black man in police custody went on the rampage, torching cars and buildings and looting stores. Fires continued to burn in the mainly black northeastern city, where a curfew was set to take effect Tuesday evening after a day of riots that dragged on into Monday night. The state of Maryland declared a state of emergency after rioters ransacked shops, making off with armloads of merchandise. Schools were closed Tuesday a safety measure. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 2:33 pm

More National Guard troops are heading to Baltimore to supplement those deployed last night after the riots that followed the funeral for 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died after suffering injuries while being detained by police.

Baltimore City Councilor Nick Mosby represents the seventh district, where the majority of last night’s destruction and violence took place. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Have Mass Shootings Led To More Gun Control?

Supporters of gun control gather on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington on Friday, during a vigil for the victims of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Ct., and to call on President Obama to pass strong gun control laws. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 2:33 pm

After the mass shootings in Aurora, Colo., and Newtown, Conn., many family members of victims made an emotional pleas for stricter gun control measures. Has anything changed since then? Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with professor Robert Spitzer of SUNY Cortland about the state of gun control in America today.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Historians Look Back At The Midwest, America's 'Forgotten' Region

(Pete Zarria/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 2:33 pm

The Midwest has come to be synonymous with certain aspects of America’s cultural history. From waves of grain to hoedowns to Grant Wood’s classic pitchfork-toting couple in “American Gothic.”

A group of historians meeting this week in Grand Rapids, Mich., say that is only a part of the story. Compared to the intellectual Northeast, literary South and innovative West Coast, they say the Midwest is too often ignored – its rich landscape and cultural diversity left out of elementary school classrooms, while the Gold Rush and Liberty Bell get the spotlight.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

David Breashears Describes Devastation At Everest Base Camp

This photo provided by Azim Afif, shows the scene at Everest Base Camp, Nepal on Tuesday, April, 28, 2015. On Saturday, a large avalanche triggered by Nepal's massive earthquake slammed into a section of the Mount Everest mountaineering base camp, killing a number of people and left others unaccounted for. Afif and his team of four others from the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) all survived the avalanche. (Azim Afif via AP)

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 2:33 pm

David Breashears is an American filmmaker and climber who’s well aware of the dangers of Mount Everest.

He’s summited five times, and he was on the mountain filming in May 1996 when a sudden blizzard killed eight climbers, among them his friends. His film about that event, the first IMAX movie shot on the mountain, aired in 1998.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Indianapolis: Tensions Stir As Murder Rate Surges

Indianapolis Police Chief Rick Hite blames the murders on the same kind of drug crimes that New York and other major cities went through in the 1980s. (Peter O'Dowd)

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 2:33 pm

Police in Indianapolis are struggling to contain a surge in murders. Last year police counted 138 homicides – a 44 percent jump from 2012.

Patrol Officer Lona Douglas works on the city’s west side in one of six neighborhoods designated as a high-crime area. On a recent afternoon, I was with her as she responded to a potential burglary.

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Parallels
1:10 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Measuring Earthquakes With More Than Just One Scale

An elderly Japanese woman carries water past a home destroyed several days earlier on Jan. 17, 1995, by a powerful earthquake centered in Kobe, Japan. More than 6,000 people were killed and destruction was widespread, but the city was rapidly rebuilt.
Lois Bernstein AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 1:34 pm

When a major earthquake pummeled Kobe, Japan, in 1995, more than 6,000 people were killed, many buried as their traditional wooden homes collapsed under the weight of heavy, unstable tile roofs.

The quake's power was extraordinary and demonstrated Japan wasn't as prepared as it thought it was. Still, it was no match for Japanese resilience.

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All Songs Considered
1:03 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Viking's Choice: Weedeater, 'Bully'

Weedeater.
Scott Kinkade Courtesy of the artist

Guys, the sticky is not the only thing on Weedeater's mind. Truth is, these Southern sludge rabble-rousers have been through some hard times — health scares, a lost member — but that doesn't shake up their fifth album, Goliathan. At 1:47, "Bully" isn't technically Weedeater's shortest song (if you count intros and interludes), but is a squirrely sludge-punk bruiser with bassist Dixie Dave cackling like a supervillain.

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The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Supreme Court Hears Challenge To 4 States' Same-Sex-Marriage Ban

Demonstrators for and against same-sex marriage rallied in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday morning.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 4:06 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing arguments Tuesday about whether states have the power to ban same-sex marriage. A dozen couples are challenging the bans in Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee.

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All Songs Considered
12:56 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Why We Like Falsetto, Why Melodies Matter And Other Musical Wonders

Top row: Audience members rate the music during our All Songs Considered listening party. Bottom row, left to right: Susan Rogers, Bob Boilen, Amelia Mason, James Reed, Stephen Thompson.
NPR

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 3:09 pm

Why do we like falsetto so much? Why is melody the single most important part of a song? And why does country music move (or repel) us? These are just a few of the questions that popped up during our All Songs Considered listening party in Boston last week.

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NPR Story
12:50 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

'Ain't no way you can sit here and be silent'

A woman faces a line of Baltimore police officers in riot gear.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 3:23 pm

"With everything that we've been through, ain't no way you can sit here and be silent in the face of injustice." — Rev. Jamal H. Bryant's eulogy for Freddie Gray at the New Shiloh Baptist Church

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Tensions Running High In Baltimore After Night Of Rioting

A man on a bicycle greets Maryland state troopers on Tuesday in the aftermath of rioting in Baltimore.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 3:45 pm

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET:

Hundreds of National Guard troops were positioned across parts of Baltimore a day after riots that left at least 20 police officers injured and more than a dozen buildings damaged, destroyed or looted.

Thousands of police officers have been deployed to "hot spots" in the city, Baltimore police Capt. Eric Kowalczyk said at a news conference Tuesday. He added that the National Guard are positioned in "strategic areas."

At least 235 people have been arrested, 34 of them juveniles, Kowalczyk said.

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Microphone Check
12:04 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Amber London: 'I'ma Show You How It's Done'

Amber London during her interview with Microphone Check during SXSW in March 2015.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

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The Salt
11:56 am
Tue April 28, 2015

How Newbie Gardeners Can Safely Grow Food On Urban Land

Graze the Roof is a community-produced garden that grows vegetables on the rooftop of a church in San Francisco.
Sergio Ruiz/Flickr

A version of this story was first published on April 5, 2015. It has been updated.

The majority of Americans now live in cities and have very little to do with the production of their food.

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