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7:05 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Emotional Trauma Part Of Hurricane Sandy's Lasting Damage

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's talk about human resilience because a less-visible effect of Sandy is the mental and emotional toll. That's especially true in Ocean Breeze, Staten Island, which suffered the highest death rate from the storm. Here's Jim O'Grady, of our member station WNYC.

JIM O'GRADY, BYLINE: Until last October, Santo and Gale Lisa had spent 30 dry years in their house on Oceanview Avenue. But then Sandy pushed a white-capped surge of water down their street.

SANTO LISA: That's how fast it came in - boom, boom.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Rebecca Walker Hurries Love In 'Adé'

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 3:05 pm

Rarely as the rush of romance felt so, well, rushed as it does in Rebecca Walker's maiden novel Adé: A Love Story. It's a wild ride along with an unnamed (more on that later) biracial college student who's traveling through Africa with her white best friend. Our unnamed narrator falls in love with a Swahili man she meets on an island just off the Kenyan coast, grows apart from her friend and closer to her lover's family, and must struggle with the brutal realities of life under brutal Kenyan leader Daniel arap Moi — all in 112 short pages.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Red Sox Lead Series 3-2, But .733 Is The Stunning Number

Big Papi is red hot: Boston's David Ortiz has driven the Red Sox to a 3-2 lead over the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series.
Rob Carr Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 8:30 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman talks with Steve Inskeep about the Series

The headline from Monday night is that the Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Cardinals by the score of 3-1 to take a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven World Series.

Game 6, which could make the Red Sox the world champions, is Wednesday night in Boston. It starts just after 8 p.m. ET and will be broadcast on Fox. If the Cardinals win Wednesday, Game 7 would be played in Boston Thursday night.

For us, the eye-popping number of the Series so far is .733.

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Strange News
6:45 am
Tue October 29, 2013

That'll Do, Pig: Neil's Not A Hog After All

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It's a happy ending for Neil the popular potbelly pig, who faced eviction from his California home. Pigs are allowed as pets in the town of Sierra Madre, but not hogs. An animal control officer suspected Neil was a hog - that is, a pig weighing more than 120 pounds. As one local put it, if everyone overweight was considered, half the town would be evicted.

Around the Nation
5:22 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Hosts Call Police After Their Own Party Rages Out Of Control

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

A desperate act in wartime comes when you call an air strike on your own position. This, in effect is what the hosts of a party in Eugene, Oregon had to do. More than 200 partygoers got out of hand. Even the private security couldn't handle it. Rather than wait for angry neighbors to call police, the homeowners called the cops themselves. Police did not make arrests as they broke things up. But their best professional judgment was that people looked a little drunk.

NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Will Hard-Line Critics Scuttle Iranian Talks?

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 8:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne. Good morning.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. The diplomatic push to answer questions about Iran's nuclear program has generated some hope for a peaceful solution. It has also inspired a backlash and negative response in both Iran and the West. On both sides, conservatives who would not normally agree about much seem to agree that nuclear negotiations are a dangerous idea that could produce what they would see as a bad deal.

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NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

As Olympics Near, Bobsledder Still Fighting For A Spot

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

With 100 days left before the Winter Olympic Games begin in Sochi, Russia, the U.S. Olympic Committee begins its countdown in Times Square today. they're bringing ice and snow into the middle of Manhattan where temperatures will be in the mid-50s so the athletes can show off their skills. But in these final months, there's still a lot of scrambling to figure out which athletes get to compete in the Games.

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NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

What's A Family Supposed To Look Like?

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 8:29 am

Steve Inskeep speaks with NPR's Gene Demby and Joanna Kakissis about the recent kidnapping allegations involving a Roma couple in Greece.

NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

'They Want To Fit In': An Uphill Struggle For Greece's Roma

Maria Souta (center), a Roma grandmother in her 50s, lives in a shack in the Roma camp near Corinth, Greece. She supports her family by picking aluminum cans out of the trash. "I really want my children to get an education and get out of here," she says.
Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 8:06 am

The boys are nervous. A big parade at the local Greek public school is coming up, and they can't afford the uniform: navy pants and a white shirt.

But the boys, all Roma from an impoverished camp near the city of Corinth, are desperate to attend.

"They want to be proud," says Maria Larsen, their teacher, as she reaches into a box of donated clothes. "They have been told over and over again at school that they are less worthy than other children. But Greece is their home, and they want to fit in."

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NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Is Deficit Fever Easing?

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Since budget talks are about to start, let's see what one other leading voices are saying about the deficit. David Wessel is economics editor of the Wall Street Journal. Good morning.

DAVID WESSEL: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: Tell us how widespread Lawrence Summers' view is that the deficit is not the main problem.

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NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Summers: Economic Growth More Important Than Deficit

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Let's hear an argument for why to worry less about America's roughly $600 billion federal deficit. The deficit represents the amount the U.S. is borrowing each year to meet expenses. That annual borrowing adds to federal debt.

INSKEEP: But for one-time Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, deficit spending right now is a chance to invest.

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NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Dubai Plans Airport So Big It Will Be Its Own City

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. The United Arab Emirates is about to take a big leap forward in its plan for regional economic domination. No, the plan is not to host another "Sex and the City" sequel, or install more vending machines that dispense gold.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The details are a bit more lofty - and today's last word in business is: up in the air. The boom city of Dubai is building the world's largest airport and it recently celebrated its first commercial flight.

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NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Federal Reserve Set To Meet For First Time Since Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Oh gosh. One of the stories you're not sure if it came from The Onion or not.

Federal Reserve policymakers are kicking off a two-day meeting today, the first since the government shutdown. The Fed is widely expected to keep interest rates right where they are and continue the big $85 billion per month bond buying program.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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NPR Story
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

New Fries Help Burger King To A Whopper Of An Earnings Boost

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with lots of hamburgers.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Around the Nation
5:15 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Judge Rules Against Part Of Texas Abortion Law

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne, good morning.

In Texas, a federal judge has struck down a key provision of that state's new abortion law one day before it was to go into effect. The judge blocked a regulation requiring that abortion doctors to be connected to nearby hospital with admitting privileges. Still, he agreed with the state about a change to the way doctors administer non-surgical medical abortions.

NPR's Kathy Lohr has more.

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All Tech Considered
2:56 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected.
Steve Greer iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

You probably know, or should know, that your cellphone is tracking your location everywhere you go. But whether law enforcement officials should have access to that data is at the center of a constitutional debate.

Matt Blaze, a professor of computer and information science at the University of Pennsylvania, says location tracking is key to how the cell system operates.

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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
2:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Reverse Commutes Now Often A Daily Slog, Too

Reverse commuters, include Kathy LeVeque (in the foreground), wait for an approaching outbound Metra commuter train at the Mayfair neighborhood stop on Chicago's northwest side.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

It is still as dark as night as Jim Rix steps out of his red brick Chicago bungalow and gets into his car, parked on the street. It's 6 a.m., and the 53-year-old engineer is getting an early start on his 35-mile commute out to Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago's southwest suburbs.

"Depending upon weather and time of day, it can take 45 minutes to two hours to get to and from work," Rix says.

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All Tech Considered
2:55 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Etsy's New Policy Means Some Items Are 'Handmade In Spirit'

Rae Padulo creates handmade ceramics, like these holiday ornaments, for her Etsy-based company, mudstar ceramics. She's disappointed with the site's new policy to allow outsourced manufacturing. "There's nothing wrong with factory-made," she says, but "that's not what Etsy started out to be."
Courtesy of Rae Padulo

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

Under online marketplace Etsy's new policies, vendors can now use an outside manufacturer to help make their goods.

That is not going down well with some longtime sellers, who are calling the new policies a turnaround from the site's original mission.

"Their moniker is, you know, a place to buy handmade. It doesn't say a place to buy factory-made," says Rae Padulo, a potter who began selling dishes and ornaments on Etsy in 2009.

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All Tech Considered
2:54 am
Tue October 29, 2013

How Video Games Are Getting Inside Your Head — And Wallet

Austin Newman, 10, of Menlo Park, Calif., is not allowed to play video games during the school week. His mother, Michelle DeWolf, says she had to take that step to keep her son focused on his homework during the week.
Michelle DeWolf

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 12:21 pm

This week on All Tech, we're exploring kids and technology with posts and radio pieces about raising digital natives. Share your thoughts and ideas in the comments, by email or tweet.

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U.S.
2:53 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Fuel Supply System Fixes Pick Up Gas After Superstorm Sandy

Apologetic signs posted at a gas station that ran out of gas on Nov. 1, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York.
Jason DeCrow AP

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:49 am

One of the effects of Superstorm Sandy a year ago could be seen at service stations throughout New York City and surrounding areas: Motorists joined long lines outside the few stations that had both electricity and gasoline.

"People were fighting over here. People were fighting over there. People were coming through the wrong way. It was chaos," Jessica Laura said at the time. "Then the cops came, and they just started organizing it."

Since then, the oil industry and policymakers have been working to shore up the region's fuel supply system.

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