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Remembrances
4:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Rodriguez Kept 'Mexican Repatriation' From Being Forgotten

Ignacio Pina, who holds his birth certificate in this 2004 photo, was one of numerous American citizens deported to Mexico in the early 20th Century. The late historian Raymond Rodriguez was instrumental in bringing this story to light.
Damian Dovarganes Associated Press

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:11 pm

In an often-hidden part of the American past, an estimated million American citizens and legal immigrants of Mexican descent were deported to Mexico in the so-called "repatriation movement" of the 1930s. We might not know about this if not for a scholar named Raymond Rodriguez, who we recently learned died of a heart attack at age 87 in his Long Beach home in late June.

Raymond Rodriguez was nearly 80 when he testified before a state committee on the California repatriation. But in his voice, you can hear the pain of the boy he once was.

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Health Care
4:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Catholics Take Sides Over Health Law's Birth Control Policy

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Around the Nation
3:02 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Banjo Billy's Bus Tour: History, Mystery And Bad Jokes

The Banjo Billy bus tour starts and ends outside the Hotel Boulderado, at the corner of 13th and Spruce streets. Banjo shares some haunting tales from previous (and possibly still-current) guests, particularly those on the third floor and inside the still-functioning Otis elevator.
Courtesy of Vince Darcangelo

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:40 am

The rambling, funky ride called Banjo Billy's Bus Tours, in Boulder, Colo., is equal parts history, crime stories and comedy. It's all woven together by John Georgis — better known as Banjo Billy — in a playful, "choose your own adventure" style.

"You can either choose a PG tour, or a PG-13 tour, or an R-rated tour," he tells one group of riders. The crowd chooses the R-rated version, but they have to work for it.

"If you want the R-rated tour, you gotta say it like a pirate," Banjo says, drawing a bunch of "arrrrghs" from tour-goers. "R it is!"

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Environment
3:01 am
Wed July 10, 2013

In Montana Wilds, An Unlikely Alliance To Save The Sage Grouse

Bryan Ulring (left), ranch hand Graham Fulton (right) and Nature Conservancy ecologist Nathan Korb (center) install a pipe on a new well dug for the cattle Ulring manages for J Bar L Ranch. The ranch is working with The Nature Conservancy to try to preserve sage grouse habitat.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 1:46 pm

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Kitchen Window
12:03 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Scape Velocity: Green Garlic Takes Flight

T. Susan Chang for NPR

If you've never grown garlic, here's how you do it: On a bright cool fall afternoon, before the ground has frozen, you pry an ordinary, unpeeled clove of garlic off the bulb. You plant it in the ground, about 4 inches down and pointy side up. Maybe you cover the soil with some straw to protect it from extremes of heat, cold and drought.

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Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Football Needs A Guardian, Not A CEO

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during a news conference at the NFL football spring meetings in Boston two months ago. Can he save our American sport from becoming a gladiator game?
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:03 am

Aaron Hernandez, who appears to be a monster, can no more be held up as representative of football than can Oscar Pistorius be fairly presented as an archetype of track and field.

But still, Hernandez does become a culminating figure. The sport is simply more and more identified with violence, both in its inherent nature and in its savage personnel.

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The Two-Way
7:10 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Asiana Crash Trip Was Pilot's First As Instructor, NTSB Says

The pilot who attempted to land Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco , says the National Transportation Safety Board. Here, a member of the team investigating the crash-landing takes a photo of the plane's landing gear.
NTSB Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:49 pm

Three pilots, all of them with extensive flying experience, were in the cockpit of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 when it crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport Saturday, says National Transportation Safety Board Chair Deborah Hersman.

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Code Switch
6:30 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Experience The Legacy Of The Civil Rights Movement In Song

Nina Simone was one of the voices that helped shape the civil rights movement.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:50 pm

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U.S.
6:26 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Congress Still Squabbling Over Student Loan Rate Increase

People walk on the Columbia University campus in New York City on July 1, the day the federal student loan interest rate hike kicked in.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The Senate is planning to vote Wednesday on a plan to bring interest rates on subsidized federal student loans back down to 3.4 percent for one more year. The rate doubled on July 1 when the chamber failed to agree on a plan.

While the Senate prepares to take the issue back up, college students are left staring at several competing proposals.

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Law
6:00 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Gays And Lesbians Turn Fight To Workplace Discrimination Ban

Esteban Roncancio and other protesters call for executive action on workplace discrimination for LGBT Americans in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

With new momentum for same-sex marriage from the Supreme Court, gays and lesbians are hoping for progress in another sphere: the workplace. In more than half the country, it's still legal to fire people because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

On Wednesday, Senate lawmakers will once again debate a bill that would change that.

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Author Interviews
5:53 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Chuck Klosterman On Batman, Bad Guys And Wearing 'The Black Hat'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:00 pm

News stories can often be distilled into good guys versus bad guys, heroes versus villains. But what makes a villain? What's the difference between a garden-variety bad guy and an evil genius, besides a couple of IQ points? Those are the questions pop culture critic Chuck Klosterman grapples with in his new book, I Wear The Black Hat.

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NPR Ombudsman
5:48 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

The Honorable 'Girlie' Senator From The State Of New York

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand asks a question of a witness on Tuesday, June 4 during a hearing on pending legislation regarding sexual assaults in the military.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 2:03 pm

How do you describe a woman who is short, feminine and has a soft voice? Do you describe any woman you meet in the same way as, say, you would a United States senator?

This was the dilemma faced by another woman who, until joining NPR in February, was an accomplished police and terrorism reporter working the mean streets of New York. Ailsa Chang was so good at WNYC that I invited her to speak to my class at Columbia Journalism School last year.

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Business
5:42 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

After Asiana Crash, Pilot Training Gets New Scrutiny

Much of the training for pilots for major airlines is conducted on sophisticated flight simulators, like this Boeing 787 simulator operated by an All Nippon Airways captain. Pilots are also trained to communicate clearly about problems they may encounter in flight.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:40 pm

Investigators are continuing to examine the training and experience of the cockpit crew of the Asiana flight that crashed Saturday in San Francisco. The pilot at the controls had nearly 10,000 hours of experience flying large jets, but only 43 hours in that particular plane, a Boeing 777. Saturday was also the pilot's first 777 landing at San Francisco International.

Pilots transition from flying one airplane model to another all the time; it's a regular part of the job as airlines add new aircraft and pilots fly new routes or get promotions to piloting bigger jets.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
5:34 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

For Now At Least, Egypt's Police Are Seen As The Good Guys

A member of Egypt's police special forces stands guard next to an armored vehicle on July 3, protecting a bridge between Cairo's Tahrir Square and Cairo University where Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered.
Manu Brabo AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:15 pm

Egypt has undergone profound change over the past 10 days. The military has overthrown an elected Islamist president and is back in control of the country amid deadly clashes between Islamists and the state security forces.

There's been another change as well: Egypt's police, long reviled by much of the population, have become unlikely heroes for opponents of the now-ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

During Egypt's 2011 uprising, revolutionaries fought pitched street battles with the police force, the protector of the autocratic regime.

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Code Switch
5:21 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

One Trayvon Martin Case, But Two Very Different Trials

Thousands of people gathered in Manhattan's Union Square in March 2012 to call for an arrest in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. Similar rallies were held all over the country.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:57 am

One gray spring afternoon last year, thousands of people descended on Manhattan's Union Square for a rally to call for the arrest of George Zimmerman, the man who shot and killed Trayvon Martin. It had been several weeks since Martin, an unarmed black 17-year-old, was killed by Zimmerman, then 28, who identifies himself as Hispanic, after a confrontation one Sunday night in a gated housing community where both Zimmerman and Martin's father resided.

The police in Sanford, Fla., held Zimmerman for a night and released him after deciding he'd acted in self-defense.

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This Is NPR
5:13 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

The NPR Podcast Guide: NPR Books

Claire Mueller NPR

Summer here's, and with it comes the much-anticipated season of summer book lists. Lots and lots of lists. If you haven't started reading, no sweat. Turns out NPR has a place for book lovers to discover page-turning stories and hear stories beyond the page: the NPR Books podcast.

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Shots - Health News
5:07 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Harmful Parasites In Cat Poop Are Widespread

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:34 am

That cat poop can pose a health risk to humans no longer surprises us.

Some cats carry a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii. Infected cats shed embryonic T. gondii, called oocysts, in their feces.

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Afghanistan
4:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Possible U.S. Troop Withdrawal Plan Worries Afghan Officials

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:00 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. President Obama has not yet decided how many troops to keep in Afghanistan after the NATO mission ends in 2014. The Pentagon and the White House both confirmed that today. Their comments follow a New York Times report that the president is seriously considering withdrawing all troops by the end of next year.

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Business
4:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Despite Scandal, Wall Street Lines Up To Bid For LIBOR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

On Wall Street, many things are bought and sold, including, occasionally, interest rates. That happened today. The owner of the New York Stock Exchange bought LIBOR, a hugely influential benchmark rate that is set in London. LIBOR is used to set many other interest rates, from credit cards to derivatives contracts.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
4:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Sen. Levin: U.S. Aid To Egypt Should Be Suspended

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Senator Carl Levin, the Michigan Democrat and chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee said last night that U.S. aide to Egypt should be suspended and Senator Levin joins us now. Welcome to the program once again.

SENATOR CARL LEVIN: Good to be with you.

SIEGEL: In a nutshell, why suspend aid to Egypt?

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