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Africa
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

U.S. Wants Egypt To Have An Inclusive Political Transition

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 7:21 pm

As the Obama administration slow-walks a decision on whether to call the ousting of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi a coup, which would lead to an aid cut off, U.S. officials are also in the awkward position of trying to encourage the Muslim Brotherhood to accept Morsi's ouster and return to the political process. President Obama has spoken by phone to the leader of Qatar, which had bankrolled the Morsi government. He's also been talking to Gulf leaders who were quick to step in to help Egypt after the Islamist government was toppled.

Politics
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Virginia Governor Mired In Controversy Over Gifts, Loans

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's already been a long summer for Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell. A steady stream of news reports have revealed gifts and loans he and his family accepted from a campaign donor, totaling some $145,000. McDonnell has been mentioned as a possible future presidential candidate, though with these revelations some now express doubt about his chances.

As NPR's Brian Naylor reports the trouble for McDonnell could also affect the Republican who hopes to succeed him in the governor's office.

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Media
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Cable News Coverage Of Zimmerman Trial Widely Criticized

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

The George Zimmerman trial has received a lot of attention and time on cable news. In many ways it resembles the sprawling coverage of earlier sensational trials. But the Zimmerman trial also has important social and cultural questions swirling around it.

Law
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

George Zimmerman Trial Winds Down As Closing Arguments Begin

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

The closing arguments in the murder trial of George Zimmerman have begun. Zimmerman is accused of shooting Florida teenager Trayvon Martin.

Remembrances
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Twister Inventor Created Thousands Of Awkward Party Moments

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Chuck Foley was responsible for millions of awkward party moments since the 1960s. Normally, that's nothing to be proud of but if you're the inventor of the game "Twister," it's not such a bad thing after all.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Foley and his business partner, Neil Rabens, invented the game for Milton Bradley in 1966. They originally called it "Pretzel."

If you're certain age there's no need to explain "Twister." But in case you need a refresher, the game is simple.

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Politics
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Resurrected Farm Bill Passes Without Food Stamps Component

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. The farm bill is back. Three weeks ago, the House surprised Hill watchers when Democrats and Republicans alike voted against the bill. Well, today, they passed it - narrowly. In today's bill, though, a huge component was missing. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports, House leaders stripped out the section of the bill that deals with food stamps.

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Politics
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

'Nuclear Option' Would End Filibusters For Appointments

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

Senate Democrats appear so fed up enough by Republicans blocking President Obama's appointments that they are preparing to change Senate rules. The so-called "nuclear option" would end the use of the filibuster when it comes to appointments, dramatically diminishing the power of the minority party in the chamber.

Economy
4:53 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

'Innovation Districts' May Be Cornerstones Of New Urban Economy

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 6:02 pm

Robert Siegel talks with Brookings Institution vice president Bruce Katz, founding director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, about his new book, The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy. Katz and his co-author Jennifer Bradley argue that "innovation districts," combining office space, residential buildings, and mixed-use retail, will be epicenters of the new urban economy.

Environment
4:43 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Wastewater Wells, Geothermal Power Triggering Earthquakes

A geothermal energy plant near the Salton Sea in California taps deep underground heat from the southern San Andreas Fault rift zone. A new study ties the amount of water pulled from the ground by the geothermal plant here to the frequency of earthquakes.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:55 pm

The continental U.S. experiences small earthquakes every day. But over the past few years, their numbers have been increasing. Geoscientists say the new epidemic of quakes is related to industrial wastewater being pumped into underground storage wells.

Now there's new research that reveals two trigger mechanisms that may be setting off these wastewater quakes — other, larger earthquakes (some as far away as Indonesia), and the activity at geothermal power plants.

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All Tech Considered
4:38 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Robert Siegel Helps Us Test Out Instagram Embedding

Host Robert Siegel and NPR News Senior Vice President Margaret Low Smith in 2012.
Stephen Voss

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 7:30 pm

As you might have read, media sharing app Instagram added a new feature this week. You can now embed Instagram photos and videos on your site.

The rollout of Instagram video didn't go smoothly, as an unknown number of users lost their inaugural videos to processing problems. So I'm putting video uploading and embedding to the test, with the help of my pal and yours, All Things Considered host Robert Siegel.

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Music Reviews
4:19 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Jay-Z Swings Triumphant Then Trivial On 'Magna Carta Holy Grail'

Jay-Z's previous albums include Reasonable Doubt and The Blueprint. He collaborated with Kanye West for Watch the Throne.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Now 43 years old, Jay-Z has become the Jay Gatsby of hip-hop: a man with a checkered background playing host to endless parties, celebrating excellence, the good life and himself. It's no wonder that he was asked to oversee the music for director Baz Luhrmann's amusement park ride version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's romantic fantasy.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:07 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Running The Paleo-Race, Celebrating Meat

Predator or prey? You'll have to choose sides when you take part in a Track Meat event.
Courtesy of Track Meat

Looking for an unusual 5K obstacle race this summer? Feeling a need to reconnect with a 40,000-year-ago paleo lifestyle? Craving some meat?

For anyone who can get to Lake Odessa, Michigan, on August 10, Track Meat may be the event for you.

At Track Meat, competitors will sign up to run as prey or predator. Dressing as "cavemen or cavewomen" is optional.

The organizers' philosophy is pithy enough:

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The Salt
4:04 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Taste Of Grandma's Kitchen: We Hack An Old Ketchup Recipe

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 3:23 pm

Editor's Note: This post is part of All Things Considered's Found Recipes project.

Although Heinz may dominate the ketchup scene, 100 years ago it wasn't uncommon to make your own at home. So why bother doing so now, when you can just buy the bottles off the shelf? At least one man, Jim Ledvinka, was motivated by nostalgia.

"Oh, yes — we remember my grandmother making ketchup. And it was quite a sight to behold," Ledvinka says.

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Health Care
3:59 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Former Insurance Exec Offers An Insider's Look At Obamacare

Pill bottles
iStockphoto.com

On March 23, 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was signed into law. It's aimed at making health insurance more affordable and reducing the overall costs of health care.

Some parts of the law have already gone into effect: Insurers can't impose lifetime dollar limits on essential benefits, like hospital stays; children can stay on their parents' plan until they're 26; children with pre-existing conditions can't be denied coverage; and all new insurance plans must cover preventive care and medical screenings.

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The Two-Way
3:55 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Report: Microsoft Helped NSA, FBI Get Around Encryption

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announces Microsoft's purchase of Skype in 2011, in San Francisco.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 5:53 am

The latest in The Guardian's series of reports on secret U.S. electronic surveillance efforts claims to detail the extent of Microsoft's cooperation with the National Security Agency, with the tech giant reportedly allowing agents to circumvent its own encryption system to spy on email and chats, as well as its cloud-based storage service.

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World Cafe
3:50 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Latin Roots: Catupecu Machu

Argentine-rock band Catupecu Machu.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:02 am

  • Listen To Catupecu Machu Perform In Buenos Aires

Though Argentina may be known for tango music, there is a strong and thriving rock scene that seems to be taking over. World Cafe recently traveled to Buenos Aires to visit the home-studio of Catupecu Machu, one of Argentina's most popular rock bands.

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Planet Money
3:48 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Where The Jobs Are (And Where They Aren't), In 1 Graph

Jobs and wages
NPR

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 6:21 pm

It's been five and a half years since the recession started, and four years since the recovery began. It's been a brutal time for the U.S. job market (obviously), and the picture is still pretty bleak.

But when you look at individual industries, you see a more nuanced picture. Many industries have lost jobs, but others are employing more people than ever.

To see how the jobs picture has changed since the start of the recession, we created the graph below. Here's how it works:

  • The size of the circle represents the number of jobs in each industry today.
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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
3:34 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

It's All Politics, July 11, 2013

Andrew Burton Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

Yes, Egypt is being torn apart and the immigration bill is in trouble. But that pales when you consider the fact that Eliot Spitzer IS RUNNING FOR NEW YORK CITY COMPTROLLER!! Fear not, NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving are all over it.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World Cafe
2:52 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Frank Turner On World Cafe

Frank Turner.
Tara Novak Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:12 pm

Singer-songwriter Frank Turner has a fanatically large following in the U.K. Though he might not be filling large halls in the States quite yet, his American fans are just as dedicated and engaged.

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The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Death And Tax Evasion: The Strange Case Of Sergei Magnitsky

Sergei Magnitsky's mother, Nataliya Magnitskaya, holds a photo of her late son in 2009.
Alexander Zemlianichenko Associated Press

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:32 pm

A Russian court found whistle-blower Sergei Magnitsky guilty of tax evasion on Thursday, ending a convoluted case that caused a diplomatic row between Moscow and Washington. It gets even more bizarre given the fact that the man on trial died in 2009.

The posthumous conviction is unprecedented in modern times – even in a country with a history of show trials. But it's not entirely unheard of throughout the ages.

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