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12:29 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

In Mississippi, Bankruptcy Follows Broken Legs

According to a recent study, more than half of the Mississippians who file for bankruptcy do so because they cannot pay their medical bills. Clarion Ledger reporter Jerry Mitchell tells host Michel Martin what's causing such devastating costs.

Movie Reviews
12:11 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

A Pirate Saga More Sobering Than Swashbuckling

Barkhad Abdi (middle) plays Muse, the leader of a band of Somali pirates who take over a freighter in Captain Phillips.
Hopper Stone Columbia Pictures

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 1:52 pm

Most kidnapping melodramas have final scenes — after their climaxes — that are, effectively, throwaways. There are sighs of relief, tearful reunions with families, cameras that dolly back on domestic tableaux to suggest the world has at last been righted.

I think it's telling that in Captain Phillips the most overwhelming scene is after the resolution, in the infirmary of a ship. So much terror and moral confusion has gone down — so much pain — that the cumulative tension can't be resolved by violence. The movie's grip remains strong even when it cuts to black.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:00 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Next On The Verdi Channel

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, on Twitter @nprclassical, or on Facebook at NPR Classical.

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The Two-Way
11:09 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Report: Syrian Rebels Executed Pro-Regime Villagers

Rebel fighters from the Al-Ezz bin Abdul Salam Brigade train at an undisclosed location near the al-Turkman mountains in Latakia province, Syria, in April.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 12:59 pm

Human Rights Watch has accused Islamist Syrian rebels of slaughtering nearly 200 unarmed civilians belonging to the minority Alawite sect and kidnapping hundreds more during an offensive against pro-regime villages.

The New York-based group issued a 105-page report on Friday outlining the atrocities it says were committed on Aug. 4 in more than a dozen villages in Latakia province.

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The Salt
11:09 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Drinking With Your Eyes: How Wine Labels Trick Us Into Buying

When the Hahn Family switched their Pinot Noir to this label, the wine started flying off the shelves.
Tucker & Hossler Courtesy of CF Napa Brand Design

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:34 pm

We're all guilty of it. Even if we don't want to admit it, we've all been suckered into grabbing a bottle of wine off the grocery store shelf just because of what's on the label. Seriously, who can resist the "see no evil" monkeys on a bottle of Pinot Evil?

But the tricks that get us to buy a $9 bottle of chardonnay — or splurge on a $40 pinot noir — are way more sophisticated than putting a clever monkey on the front.

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All Tech Considered
11:08 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Health Site Stumbling, Twitter's Roots

Twitter Chairman and Square CEO Jack Dorsey.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 11:53 am

It's Friday, which means we're rounding up the tech headlines and our NPR coverage of technology and culture this week.

ICYMI

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Shots - Health News
11:03 am
Fri October 11, 2013

California Trains Helpers To Meet Demand For Health Insurance

Edward Avalos, one of the first certified enrollment specialists in California, is a very busy man.
Sarah Varney Kaiser Health News

Luisa Blue, head of the local Service Employees International Union in San Jose, Calif., has five more months to spend $1 million. The union received a grant from Covered California, the state's health insurance marketplace, to educate the public about the exchange.

SEIU is using some of the money to call people in their homes at night and on the weekend. "Over 4,000 (people) have said tell me more about Covered California and how can I enroll to get health insurance," Blue says of the union's first two weeks on the case.

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Parallels
10:41 am
Fri October 11, 2013

What You Need To Know About The Group That Won The Nobel

U.N. chemical weapons experts carry samples collected on Aug. 28 from a site of an alleged chemical weapons attack near the Syrian capital Damascus. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which is dismantling Syria's chemical weapons stockpile, was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:40 am

The Norwegian Nobel Committee on Friday awarded the 2013 peace prize to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, a group that's only recently been thrust into the spotlight as it works to dismantle Syria's chemical program.

The OPCW, which is based at the Hague, was established in 1997 and now has an annual budget of $100 million and a staff of about 500 people. Here's a profile of the group.

Where is the OPCW working?

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The Picture Show
10:03 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Public Square Photo Assignment: Show Us Your Commute!

It takes NPR multimedia producer Kainaz Amaria 30 minutes to commute to work in Washington, D.C. Sometimes it takes a little longer when light, movement and people converge into a sweet scene.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 10:35 am

There are a few unavoidable things in life: death, taxes and, for most of us, commuting. This month we want you to take a closer look at your commute, a continuation of our "Public Square" series with KPCC.

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Monkey See
9:51 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Gravity' And The Thrill Of The Fiasco

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

I cannot lie: I love this week's podcast very much, and only partly because I got to include a song I probably haven't heard in over 20 years and got our special guest Gene Demby to reveal one of those little things that makes him apoplectic.

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TED Radio Hour
9:37 am
Fri October 11, 2013

What Do You Call Home?

"I think being a part of many places but not entirely of any one of them is a terrific emancipation" — Pico Iyer
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 9:25 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Identities.

About Pico Iyer's TEDTalk

Country and culture used to serve as the cornerstones of identity, but what does "home" mean to someone who comes from many places? Writer Pico Iyer talks about the meaning of home in a world where the old boundaries of nation-states no longer apply.

About Pico Iyer

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TED Radio Hour
9:37 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Can Stories Overcome Identity Politics?

"If you're a woman writer from the Muslim world, like me, then you are expected to write the stories of Muslim women — and preferably, the unhappy stories of unhappy Muslim women" — Elif Shafak
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:27 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Identities.

About Elif Shafak's TEDTalk

Novelist Elif Shafak describes how fiction has allowed her to explore many different lives, to jump over cultural walls, and how it may have the power to overcome identity politics.

About Elif Shafak

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TED Radio Hour
9:37 am
Fri October 11, 2013

What Does Identity Mean For An Immigrant?

"I feel like I've lived many lives, sometimes" — Tan Le
TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:27 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Identities.

About Tan Le's TEDTalk

Entrepreneur Tan Le recounts her family's harrowing journey from Vietnam to Australia. She talks about how her upbringing as a Vietnamese refugee living in Australia has defined her identity.

About Tan Le

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TED Radio Hour
9:37 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Identities

"Stories move like whirling dervishes ... they connect all humanity, regardless of identity politics." — Elif Shafak, novelist
Ryan McVay Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:47 am

  • Listen to the Episode

My home is where I find my identity, where I create my identity which is an ongoing phenomenon. — Pico Iyer

Each of us has a sense of who we are, where we come from, and what we believe. But is identity assigned at birth? Shaped by circumstance? Or is it something we choose, that changes over time? In this hour, TED speakers describe their journeys to answer the question: who am I?

TED Radio Hour
9:37 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Can Your Child's Identity Shape Yours?

"The point when peace arrives is when you no longer feel like ... you need to make a noisy celebration about it, when you've just incorporated into who you are" — Andrew Solomon
TEDMED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:27 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Identities.

About Andrew Solomon's TEDTalk

What is it like to raise a child whose very identity is fundamentally different than yours? Writer Andrew Solomon shares what he learned from talking to dozens of parents and how the experience shaped the identities of both parent and child.

About Andrew Solomon

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Fri October 11, 2013

JPMorgan, Dogged By Legal Costs, Reports Hefty 3Q Loss

People pass a sign for JPMorgan Chase at its headquarters in Manhattan last year.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:48 pm

JPMorgan Chase & Co., the largest U.S. bank by assets, is reporting a surprise third-quarter loss that comes on the heels of a nearly $1 billion settlement with federal regulators over risky trades.

The bank's $380 million loss for the July-to-September period compares to a then-record profit of $5.7 billion a year earlier.

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It's All Politics
9:01 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Trickle-Down Stories: How The Shutdown Feels Across America

A sport fishing guide in the Florida Keys protests the closure of Everglades National Park waters for fishing as part of the U.S. government shutdown.
Joe Skipper Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 2:25 pm

Most Americans say they aren't directly affected by the shutdown. But some pockets of society, beyond furloughed federal workers and their families, are being severely hit.

We used NPR's social media network to ask about the impact and were deluged by messages from people who are worried and scared, especially veterans and the disabled, and many others who are angry and frustrated.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Top Stories: Nobel Peace Prize; Movement (Maybe) On Shutdown

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:42 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Chemical Weapons Watchdog Gets Nobel Peace Prize

-- No Deal Yet, But Maybe An Opening

And here are more early headlines:

Syria's Rebels Executed Civilians, Say Human Rights Watch (BBC)

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It's All Politics
8:19 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Friday Morning Political Mix

House Republicans, led by Speaker John Boehner, took steps to talk with Democrats with the goal of ending the fiscal impasse.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 9:05 am

Happy Friday, fellow political junkies. It's the 11th day of the partial federal government shutdown, 2013 edition.

President Obama and House Republicans at least opened a line of communications before the second week of the shutdown ended, so that was good news.

Less positive was that it came only a week before the Oct. 17 expiration date Treasury Secretary Jack Lew gave for when he would run out of tricks to keep the U.S. government from defaulting on its obligations.

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Fri October 11, 2013

No Deal Yet, But Maybe An Opening

Speaker of the House John Boehner during a news conference with members of the House Republican leadership at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday morning.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 4:37 pm

It's groundhog day — again — in Washington. Friday is playing out a lot like Thursday — that is, a lot of sound and fury, but very little clarity about what it all signifies.

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