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Middle East
5:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Did Turkey Sell Out Israeli Agents To Iran?

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:32 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Did Turkey sell out Israeli agents to Iran? Washington Post columnist David Ignatius reports today on a twist in the strained relations between Turkey and Israel. Ignatius writes about something that he says happened in early 2012. At the time, the Turks were still furious over the loss of life two years earlier, when Israeli commandoes had boarded a Turkish flotilla that was bringing humanitarian aid to Gaza.

David Ignatius joins us now to talk about this. Welcome to the program once again.

DAVID IGNATIUS: Thank you, Robert.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

In 'All Is Lost,' Plenty To Be Found

Robert Redford plays the sole character in All Is Lost; a man who is stranded at sea, on a badly damaged boat β€” and completely on his own.
Daniel Daza Roadside Attractions/Lionsgate

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 3:40 pm

Other than a single shouted expletive toward the end of All Is Lost, the only words we hear from its central character β€” a sailor adrift alone on the Indian Ocean β€” come right at the beginning, in a note of apology to unknown recipients for unspecified sins.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

WikiLeaks Gets A Hollywood Gloss In 'Fifth Estate'

Benedict Cumberbatch (left), sporting the white-blond mop of the real Julian Assange, and Daniel Bruhl, who plays Daniel Domscheit-Berg, take on the story of WikiLeaks in The Fifth Estate.
Frank Connor DreamWorks II

The saga of Julian Assange and WikiLeaks is too large a data dump for a two-hour drama. Yet director Bill Condon seeks to complicate as well as simplify in The Fifth Estate, an entertaining if inevitably unreliable current events romp.

The opening credits present a pocket history of textual communication, from cuneiform to the Internet. Condon, who took a similarly breathless approach with Kinsey, is announcing that his subject is nothing less than how the Web transformed communication.

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Around the Nation
5:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Tourists And Business Welcome Reopened National Parks

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:54 pm

National Parks are reopening after the government shutdown. Many visitors and nearby businesses had been frustrated that Washington's inability to reach a budget deal had also meant the ruin of vacations and the loss of tourism business.

Around the Nation
5:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Businesses, City Relieved By Return Of Federal Workers

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:54 pm

It was back to work Thursday for thousands of federal employees in Washington, D.C., following the end of the 16-day government shutdown. The return to work was also a relief for business owners and city officials, who have been hurt by the loss of income from federal workers and tourists.

Sports
5:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

NFL Fans Weigh Impact Of Players' Head Injuries

Fans cheer wildly with a Kansas City Chiefs player at an NFL game against the Oakland Raiders. For many fans, the risky side of football doesn't quell their love of the sport.
Ed Zurga AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 5:35 pm

The NFL season is in high gear β€” a fact that pleases the roughly 64 percent of Americans who watch football. The season rolls on despite the now constant news about concussions in the sport.

The recent TV documentary League of Denial and the book by the same name claim that for years the NFL had denied and covered up evidence linking football and brain damage. Is the concussion conversation challenging this country's deep love for the game?

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Book Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Anne Rice's New Werewolf Novel Paws Familiar Territory

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:54 pm

Alan Chese reviews The Wolves of Midwinter, the latest in Anne Rice's The Wolf Gift Chronicles.

Shots - Health News
4:59 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 5:35 pm

While the brain sleeps, it clears out harmful toxins, a process that may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's, researchers say.

During sleep, the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain increases dramatically, washing away harmful waste proteins that build up between brain cells during waking hours, a study of mice found.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Obama Will Nominate Jeh Johnson To Head Homeland Security

Jeh Johnson in June of 2012.
Alex Wong Getty Images

President Obama will nominate attorney Jeh Johnson to be the next Homeland Security secretary.

Johnson recently served as the Pentagon's top lawyer.

Obama will announce his pick at 2 p.m. Friday, NPR's Scott Horsley tells us.

The Department of Homeland Security is currently without a leader. Former Secretary Janet Napolitano ended her stint six weeks ago. She left to become the president of the University of California system.

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From Scratch
4:23 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Joan Ganz Cooney, Co-Founder Of Sesame Workshop

Jessica Harris speaks with television producer Joan Ganz Cooney, co-founder of Sesame Workshop, a non-profit organization that develops children's shows intended to help children everywhere reach their highest potential. After, she talks with Stephen McDonnell, founder of Applegate Farms, a natural organic meat company.

It's All Politics
4:10 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

4 Things To Know About Cory Booker's Election

Sen.-elect Cory Booker of Newark, N.J., talks to supporters during his victory party Wednesday night. Booker was elected to fill the seat of the late Frank Lautenberg.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:26 pm

Cory Booker's victory Wednesday in New Jersey's special Senate election didn't surprise anyone.

From the moment he captured the Democratic nomination in the reliably blue state, the Newark mayor was the heavy favorite to defeat Republican Steve Lonegan.

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Shots - Health News
3:59 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

How The GOP's Shutdown Over Obamacare Fell Short

Susan and Jack Cooper of Richardson, Texas, demonstrate against the government shutdown in Dallas this month.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 5:44 pm

Remember how that fight over the budget was all about Obamacare?

Seems like ancient history now, but House Republicans ostensibly shut down the government 17 days ago, demanding first a defunding, and, when that failed, a year's delay in the health law.

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Economy
3:58 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Economists Fear 'Flying Blind' Without Government Data

The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, D.C., where the federal government shutdown left policymakers without key economic data.
J. David Ake AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 4:51 pm

Talk to economists about the government shutdown's impact on their forecasts and you'll hear this phrase again and again:

Flying blind.

For economists and investors, "at this moment, we are flying blind," said Alan Greenspan, former chairman of the Federal Reserve and now president of Greenspan Associates LLC, a consulting firm.

Greenspan is not alone in feeling a little lost without the compass of government reports.

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Report: NSA Plays Crucial Role In Drone Attacks

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 7:00 pm

Basing its reporting on documents obtained by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, The Washington Post moved a story last night that details a close collaboration between the spy agency and the Central Intelligence Agency, when it conducts drone attacks against suspected terrorists.

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Parallels
3:12 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

India, China Top List Of Nations With Most Slaves

Child laborers wait to be processed at a safe house after being rescued during a raid at a factory in New Delhi by workers from Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Childhood Movement) in June.
Kevin Frayer AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 6:45 pm

Nearly 30 million people live in slavery worldwide, with most of them in Asia and Africa, according to a report released Thursday.

The Walk Free Foundation's ranking incorporates factors that include the traditional definition of slavery β€” owning another person β€” as well as things such as child marriage and human trafficking.

Here are the highlights of the report:

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Post-Shutdown Palate Cleanser: Panda Cam Is Back!

The panda cub now weighs 5 pounds. This photo was taken Tuesday.
Courtney Janney Smithsonian's National Zoo

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 6:56 pm

If the ugliness in Washington left a bad taste in your mouth, we have the perfect palate cleanser.

The panda cam at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, which was shutdown along with the federal government, is back online. It means you can once again ogle the now eight-week-old cub and her mother, Mei Xiang.

The zoo writes:

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A Blog Supreme
2:23 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Five Songs By The 'Rhodes Scholar' Keyboardist Of Hip-Hop

Keyboardist and producer Bob James' 1970s work helped to establish the sound of smooth jazz β€” and lives on in hip-hop samples galore.
Courtesy of the artist

Professing love for Bob James' music can yield a side-eye in some circles. Jazz purists routinely view the keyboardist's 1970s period as a progenitor to smooth jazz β€” an idiom they frequently react to as if it were a sign of the apocalypse.

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Live in Concert
2:18 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Cults, Live In Concert

Cults performed live Wednesday at NPR Music's showcase at (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York.
Loren Wahl for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 3:45 pm

Set List

  • "High Road"
  • "Slow Song"
  • "Abducted"
  • "Always Forever"
  • "Were Before"
  • "You Know What I Mean"
  • "I Can Hardly Make You Mine"
  • "Go Outside"
  • "Keep Your Head Up"

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Shots - Health News
2:04 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Houston, We Have Dengue Fever

Mosquitoes like thisΓ‚ Aedes aegypti female can spread dengue fever.
James Gathany CDC

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 5:03 pm

Dengue fever is in Houston. And it turns out the mosquito-borne illness isn't exactly a stranger there.

Dengue has been roaming around the city since 2003, according to a study published Wednesday. "There was dengue circulating, and we had no idea that it was here because we just weren't looking," says the study's lead author Dr. Kristy Murray of the Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital.

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World Cafe
2:00 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Tedeschi Trucks Band On World Cafe

Tedeschi Trucks Band.
Mark Seliger Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:47 pm

Two of the best roots rock musicians of their generation make an appearance on a special episode of World Cafe, which is hosted in NPR's Studio A at the organization's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Singer Susan Tedeschi and her husband, guitarist Derek Trucks, joined forces in 2010 and formed the Tedeschi Trucks Band.

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