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Africa
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Egyptian Military Suspends Country's Constitution

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

We have the latest from Egypt, where the military ousted President Mohamed Morsi and suspended the country's constitution.

Africa
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Egyptian Military Says It Has Overthrown President Morsi

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHANTING)

SIEGEL: In Egypt, the military, backed by millions of protestors, has ousted President Mohammed Morsi. Celebratory fireworks and laser lights are lighting up the crowd in Tahrir Square. Elsewhere in Cairo, crowds are gathered to demonstrate on behalf of Morsi and, they say, mourn the death of democracy.

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Around the Nation
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Gettysburg Swells As Throngs Mark Civil War's Turning Point

Men dressed as members of the Union infantry demonstrate battalion formations for tourists.
Chris Connelly NPR

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 5:15 pm

About three dozen men dressed in Confederate Army uniforms woke Wednesday morning on historical campgrounds at the iconic Gettysburg battlefield. Soggy from the night's rain, they warmed themselves by the fire and cooked up bacon and potatoes.

The re-enactors joined hundreds of others camping out to show visitors what life may have been like for Civil War soldiers. It's part of a huge display the National Parks Service is putting on to mark the Battle of Gettysburg's 150th anniversary.

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Around the Nation
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Federal Budget Cuts Hamper Summer Firefighting Efforts

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:13 pm

The wildfire season is expected to intensify and firefighters are facing it with decreasing resources. Federal budget cuts, including the sequester, mean fewer firefighters, less equipment and less spending on prevention.

National Security
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

'Transit Zones' Can Extend Beyond Airports

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Ever since Edward Snowden, a former NSA contractor who has been leaking secret documents, arrived at Moscow's airport over a week ago, his efforts to find asylum from U.S. prosecution have been thwarted. Some countries have turned him down, while others have said they can't consider his request unless he's physically on their soil or at their borders. Snowden's been out of sight in the airport's transit zone, but he's believed to still be there in a legal limbo that's officially not Russian territory.

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Health Care
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Delay In Obacamare Implementation Cheered By Employers

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Obama administration's decision to delay implementation of a key part of the Affordable Care Act is winning praise from business groups today. The administration has announced it will wait another year before penalizing large employers who fail to offer health care coverage to their workers. The delay gives retail and restaurant companies that had opposed the mandate more time to prepare for the law.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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It's All Politics
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Democrats Want To Mess With Texas? GOP Says Not So Fast

A Texas delegate on the floor of the Republican National Convention in 2012.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Democrats see opportunity in Texas' fast-growing Latino population. But the Republican Party is strong in Texas — very strong.

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History
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Leaders Draw Different Messages From Battle Of Gettysburg

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Our leaders have been commemorating Gettysburg ever since 1863 - most famously President Lincoln that November when he dedicated the cemetery there. Later, presidents and vice presidents have observed many anniversaries at Gettysburg. For the centennial in 1963, Lyndon Johnson, still the vice president, linked the Civil War to the civil rights movement.

PRESIDENT LYNDON B. JOHNSON: One hundred years ago, a slave was freed. One hundred years later, the negro remains in bondage to the color of his skin.

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Space
5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Why You Can't Name New Moons And Planets Anything You Want

This artist's illustration shows Pluto and one of its moons, Charon. A global consortium of astronomers sets the rules for naming things like asteroids and moons throughout the solar system.
Detlev van Ravenswaay Science Source

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

A dispute over the names of two new moons of Pluto is highlighting a broader battle over who names what in our solar system and beyond. On one side is the International Astronomical Union (IAU), a venerable consortium of astronomers who have set the naming rules for the better part of a century. On the other side, a growing number of astronomers who feel the IAU has unfairly designated itself as the intergalactic naming police.

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Parallels
5:37 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Egypt's Military Reasserts Its Enduring Power

Military special forces surround supporters of President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo on Wednesday. A few hours later, the military ousted Morsi and suspended the constitution.
Hassan Ammar AP

Egypt's military has played a dominant role in the country since a 1952 coup, and Wednesday's ouster of President Mohammed Morsi showed that the armed forces still feel empowered to intervene when they disapprove of the country's course.

"They are the center of gravity in the Egyptian state," said Jeffrey Martini, a Middle East analyst at the Rand Corp. in Washington, speaking shortly before the coup on Wednesday night. "They are the strongest player in the game."

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Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

"Liver buds" grow in petri dishes. The rudimentary organs are about 5 mm wide, or half the height of a classic Lego block.
Courtesy of Takanori Takebe/Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Japanese scientists have cracked open a freaky new chapter in the sci-fi-meets-stem-cells era. A group in Yokohama reported it has grown a primitive liver in a petri dish using a person's skin cells.

The organ isn't complete. It's missing a few parts. And it will be years --maybe decades — before the technique reaches clinics.

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Middle East
4:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Pakistan's New Prime Minister Gets No 'Honeymoon Period'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's been four weeks since Pakistan's new Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif took the oath of office. In that time, Pakistan has suffered a wave of militant attacks, an economically crippling electricity crisis, and now a deadly drone strike. Many Pakistanis deeply resent U.S. drone attacks against targets in their tribal belt bordering Afghanistan. Recently, there's been a lull in these, but overnight a fresh missile strike killed at least 17 people.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports.

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Africa
4:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Muslim Brotherhood Rep: Democracy Only Works Through Ballot Box

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Professor Abdul Mawgoud Dardery is the foreign affairs spokesman of President Morsi's party, the Freedom and Justice Party. It's aligned with the Muslim Brotherhood, which he is a member. And he joins us now, Dr. Dardery does, from Luxor, Egypt. Welcome to the program once again. And give us your reaction to what's happened today in Egypt.

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Around the Nation
4:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Arizona Firefighter Remembered For Loving His Job

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

In Arizona, friends and family of the 19 firefighters killed in the Yarnell Hill Fire are sharing their memories.

Music
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Does Macklemore Really Thrift Shop?

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 12:13 pm

Macklemore and Ryan Lewis are chart-topping rap sensations. In a special rebroadcast, they sat down last year with guest host Celeste Headlee to talk about their latest album 'The Heist' a few months before their fame hit its biggest heights.

History
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Celebrating The Expansion Of Our Nation

On July 4, 1803, President Thomas Jefferson announced the signing of the Louisiana Purchase, when the United States bought more than 800,000 square miles of land from the French. On this anniversary, guest host Celeste Headlee highlights some of the forgotten history around the purchase.

Food
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Just As American As Chorizo

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we continue our discussion on the history and traditions of Independence Day. Sure, there are parades and John Philip Sousa marches, but for many Americans, the grilled hot dogs and hamburgers are as important as the fireworks. Historian Kenneth C. Davis told us earlier that Fourth of July celebrations began in 1776, but the foods we now consider traditional didn't arrive until much later.

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U.S.
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

As Americans, We Stand ... Divided?

The American Values Survey finds that citizens of the U.S. think they're more divided today than they were a decade ago. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Don Baer about whether we're really as different as we believe we are.

History
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

How Slavery Almost Made It Into The Declaration

More than any other day of the year, the Fourth of July is a time to take pride in American history. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks to author Kenneth C. Davis about what you shouldn't forget this Independence Day.

This Is NPR
4:33 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Zack Snyder Loves NPR

Arezou Rezvani NPR

It's never an easy task to remake a beloved part of American culture, but director Zack Snyder took the challenge with Superman in his new film Man of Steel, starring Henry Cavill as the man himself and Amy Adams as Lois Lane.

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