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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Daniel Ellsberg: NSA Leaker Showed Battlefield Courage

Daniel Ellsberg; Jan. 16, 2010.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 12:58 pm

Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers in 1971, says Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret documents about an NSA surveillance program, showed "the kind of courage that we expect of people on the battlefield."

Ellsberg, who became one of the first to be prosecuted under the 1917 Espionage Act, told CNN that if he had been in Snowden's position, he would have broken the law in an act of civil disobedience.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Trayvon Martin Killing: 2 Sides Want Very Different Jurors

George Zimmerman, the man accused of second-degree murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.
Joe Burbank / Orlando Sentinel MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 8:59 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Greg Allen previews the George Zimmerman trial

Nearly 16 months after the shooting death of African-American teenager Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., the man charged with second-degree murder is due in court Monday for the start of his trial.

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Monkey See
8:23 am
Mon June 10, 2013

The Tony Awards: Is This The Greatest Awards Show Opening Ever?

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 09: Host Neil Patrick Harris and casts of Broadway shows perform onstage at The 67th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 9, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions)
Andrew H. Walker Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 10:57 am

Unless you've seen every awards show since the dawn of time (which would make you The Unluckiest Person In The World), you can't really answer the question of whether last night's opener of the Tony Awards, hosted for the fourth time by Neil Patrick Harris, was the best opening ever.

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Mon June 10, 2013

After Igniting In 2nd Half, Heat Easily Beat Spurs In Game 2

Oh no you don't: The Miami Heat's LeBron James (right) rejects a slam dunk attempt by the San Antonio Spurs' Tiago Splitter during Sunday night's game in Miami.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 8:56 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman reports on Game 2 of the NBA finals

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Europe
7:34 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Swedish Commuter Rail Engineers Get Around Dress Code

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. In Stockholm, engineers on the Swedish commuter rail line have found a new way to skirt a dress code. The drivers were told no more shorts, even though the heat in the cab can top 95 degrees - just long pants or skirts. So many of the male engineers are now wearing skirts. Women are allowed to, so the company says it will not discriminate. Something tasteful in an A-line, or pleats, perhaps? It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Deputies Help Deer With Doritos Bag Stuck On Its Head

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Key deer in Florida are an endangered species. Their diet includes leaves and berries - definitely not Doritos - which does not mean a deer can't get cravings. Sheriff's deputies on patrol in the Florida Keys spotted one on the side of the road, with an empty bag of Doritos stuck on its head. It must have wanted the last chip in the bottom, a deputy told the South Florida Sun Sentinel. The deer stood calmly as the deputies removed the bag.

The Two-Way
7:16 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Who Is Edward Snowden, The Self-Styled NSA Leaker?

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 10:21 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Tom Gjelten on the NSA leaks

Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old former CIA technical assistant who has stepped forward to say he's the source of explosive leaks about government surveillance programs was among "thousands upon thousands" of such analysts hired to manage and sift through "huge amounts of data," NPR's Tom Gjelten

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Parallels
7:15 am
Mon June 10, 2013

In Venezuela, A Family Blames The Police For Their Misery

Eloisa Barrios visits the humble graves of nine male family members in the Guanayen cemetery. She says all nine were killed by the police, in what was a vendetta against her family. Recently, a 10th member of the family was stabbed to death. He was 17.
Meridith Kohut for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:05 pm

The story of Venezuela's Eloisa Barrios is especially revealing because so many of her relatives have been killed. Revealing because of who she believes pulled the trigger.

Some weeks ago, Barrios climbed into our van for a drive to a cemetery. The burial ground is outside a village in the Venezuelan countryside. We went there to visit the Barrios family dead.

She told us nine relatives had been killed in shootings over the past 15 years. All nine were young men.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Jeannette Walls' 'Silver Star' Lacks Spunk And Direction

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

"You've got spunk," Lou Grant says to Mary Richards on the very first episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. And then he adds, famously, "I hate spunk." The year is 1970, the same year in which Jeannette Walls set her new novel, The Silver Star. In the book, someone tells the 12-year-old narrator, Bean Holladay, that she's got spunk too. Maybe it's no coincidence. 1970, after all, was situated squarely in the middle of second-wave feminism. It was an era when women and girls were asserting themselves and finding their voices, which weren't always met with approval.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
7:03 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Sneak Preview: 5 Books To Look Forward To This Summer

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 10:28 am

My summer reading preferences are so particular they have, at times, stopped me from reading at all. I need a romance for a train trip — for obvious reasons. When it's hot, I prefer something with no climate congruence at all; I've never enjoyed Anna Karenina so much as I did on the beach (that romance is a train exception — er ... for obvious reasons). When I'm on a plane trip, I like a passel of good young-adult novels, filled with cliffhangers, reversals and quick emotion. It's a mood makeover in flight.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Book News: Iain Banks, 'Two Of Our Finest Writers,' Dies

Scottish novelist Iain Banks wrote science fiction under the name Iain M. Banks, and mainstream fiction under the name Iain Banks.
Ray Charles Redman

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:44 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:20 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Ukrainian Wins Top Prize At Van Cliburn Piano Competition

Cliburn medalists Beatrice Rana, second place winner; Vadym Kholodenko, first place winner; and Sean Chen, third place winner, receive applause from the audience at the final awards ceremony at the 14th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition on Sunday.
Rodger Mallison MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 11:39 am

Winners of 14th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition were announced Sunday night in Fort Worth, Texas. The competition was held over 17 days.

Vadym Kholodenko, 26, of Ukraine, won the top prize of $50,000, but he said the rankings don't mean that much.

"It's kind of fun for audience, for press. It's interesting to put first, second, 10th and so on. But in life, not so important," Kholodenko says.

And, he says, so much of life involves competing no matter what you're doing.

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National Security
4:30 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Confessed NSA Leaker Hole Up In Hong Kong Hotel

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:08 am

The Guardian has identified its source for a series of reports it published in recent days on secret U.S. surveillance activity. The paper says the source is Edward Snowden, a former technical assistant for the CIA who now works for a private-sector defense and technology consulting firm.

Middle East
4:30 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Syrian Government Limits Humanitarian Aid To Qusair

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 8:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The last remaining villages of the embattled Syrian region, Qusair fell to government forces and fighters from the Lebanese-Shiite militia, Hezbollah, over the weekend. The main concern now is what's happening to the civilians there. The Syrian government has severely limited humanitarian groups, like the Red Cross, from getting in and aiding the people of Qusair.

NPR's Kelly McEvers is monitoring the story from nearby Beirut. She joins us. And, Kelly, what is the situation for civilians in Qusair?

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National Security
4:30 am
Mon June 10, 2013

'Guardian' Reveals Source Of NSA Leaks

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:08 am

The Guardian newspaper says the insider who blew the whistle on the NSA's probing of major U.S. Internet and telecom companies is a 29-year-old analyst who's been working for the agency under a government contract. His name is Edward Snowden.

Law
4:30 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Jury Selection To Begin In Trayvon Martin Case

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:08 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In Sanford, Florida, jury selection begins today in the murder trial of George Zimmerman. The neighborhood watch volunteer is charged with the shooting death of a 17-year-old, Trayvon Martin, last year. Police, at first, declined to charge Zimmerman because of Florida's Stand-Your-Ground law. It gives immunity to people who use deadly force in self defense.

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Sports
4:30 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Heat Breaks Away From Spurs To Win Game 2

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:08 am

The series is tied at one game a piece. The Miami Heat beat the San Antonio Spurs Sunday night 103-84. Last week, the Spurs beat the Heat in the opener.

Animals
4:30 am
Mon June 10, 2013

City Life Disrupts Daily Rhythm Of Birds

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:08 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

You've heard the expression Bright Lights, Big City. For many people, city living can mean long hours at work and play and never enough sleep. Now a new study suggests that cities can have a very similar effect on another group of residents: birds. NPR's Rhitu Chatterjee reports.

RHITU CHATTERJEE, BYLINE: Since the 1930s, scientists have noticed that birds in cities, like robins and starlings, can keep different hours than their relatives in forests. Barbara Helm is a biologist at the University of Glasgow.

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Business
4:30 am
Mon June 10, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:38 am

Saudi prince and conspicuous billionaire Alwaleed bin Talal is suing the magazine in a London court. In its annual list of the world's wealthiest people, Forbes estimates bin Talal's fortune at $20 billion. But the prince says the magazine publicly short changed him by nearly $10 billion.

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