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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Police: San Francisco Killing Was Sparked By Baseball Rivalry

A general view of the field at AT&T Park in San Francisco.
Thearon W. Henderson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 6:56 pm

The rivalry between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants added another dark chapter to its history this week: Police said today that Wednesday night's stabbing death near San Francisco's AT&T Park was sparked by a baseball rivalry.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

'Out In The Dark,' Where Nothing Is Black Or White

Nicholas Jacob (Nimr) and Michael Aloni (Roy) are star-crossed lovers of a different stripe in the Israeli drama Out in the Dark.
Ran Aviad Breaking Glass Pictures

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 8:25 am

Paving the way for a brand-new subgenre — the gay romantic thriller — the atmospheric neo-noir Out in the Dark tells of a Palestinian university student who seeks refuge from the homophobia of his traditionalist West Bank village in the more gay-friendly atmosphere of metropolitan Tel Aviv.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

For Richer And For Poorer, But What Of That Vanishing Middle?

Former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich, now a professor at the University of California-Berkeley, takes a look at growing income disparity in Inequality for All.
Radius/TWC

The U.S. financial sector's 2007-2008 swoon hurt a lot of people, but it's been a bonanza for documentary filmmakers with an interest in economics. The last five years have seen dozens of movies about the dismal science, most of them pegged to the Great Recession.

The latest is Inequality for All, a showcase for former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich. (He served under Bill Clinton, who borrowed much of his fellow Rhodes scholar's rhetoric, if fewer of his prescriptions.)

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Education
4:51 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

College Board 'Concerned' About Low SAT Scores

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:19 pm

The College Board, sponsor of the SAT, says latest scores show that roughly 6 in 10 college-bound high school students who took the test were so lacking in their reading, writing and math skills, they were unprepared for college-level work.

The College Board is calling for big changes to better prepare students for college and career.

Stagnant Scores

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Theater
4:51 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

An American Masterpiece, And A 'Menagerie' Of Stars

In a Broadway transfer of the American Repertory Theatre's acclaimed production of The Glass Menagerie, Cherry Jones plays Amanda, mother to the very troubled Laura (Celia Keenan-Bolger). The play cemented Tennessee Williams' reputation as an American original when it premiered in 1945.
Michael J. Lutch

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:19 pm

Pop-culture aficionadoes will know Zachary Quinto as Spock in the cinematic reboot of Star Trek, and Cherry Jones as President Taylor from television's 24.

But both are accomplished stage actors as well. And tonight, they're opening on Broadway, in a revival of Tennessee Williams' classic play The Glass Menagerie.

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NPR Story
4:51 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Civil Rights Crusader Evelyn Lowery Dies At Age 88

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

One of the country's notable civil rights activists has died. Evelyn Lowery was at the front of the line marching from Selma to Montgomery. And her activism did not end in the 1960s. It defined her entire life. Here's Lisa George of member station WABE with a remembrance.

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NPR Story
4:51 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Drought Forces New Mexico Ranchers to Better Manage the Land

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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NPR Story
4:51 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

After 40 Years, Mulatu Astatke Still 'Sketches' Ethio-Jazz Deftly

Mulatu Astatke is known as the father of "Ethio-jazz." His new album, Sketches of Ethiopia, is a multinational collaboration that mixes many styles but stays true to Astatke's Ethiopian roots.
Alexis Maryon Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:19 pm

It is bold indeed for any jazz artist to evoke Miles Davis' landmark album Sketches of Spain. But Mulatu Astatke, like Miles, is a true original.

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Shots - Health News
4:22 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

'How Much Will Obamacare Cost Me?' Try Our Calculator

No envelope backs required for this health care calculation.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:13 pm

On Tuesday, if all goes according to plan, the federal health law's marketplaces for individual health insurance are scheduled to open for business.

Nearly all Americans will be required to have health insurance starting Jan. 1, 2014, or else they'll be liable for a tax penalty.

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World Cafe
4:13 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Pokey LaFarge On World Cafe

Pokey LaFarge and his band, the South City Three.
Courtesy of the artist

Pokey LaFarge transports listeners to a bygone era on Thursday's installment of World Cafe. Along with his band, LaFarge has turned his modern reverence for roots music into a full-time gig. The perceptible influences in his work range from bluegrass to Western swing to country blues. Whether you call it old-fashioned, dated or throwback, the Missouri-bred musician embraces it fully; he even dresses the part.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

What's Lurking In Your Lake? Sonar Turns Up Startling Finds

Capt. Paul Carey of the Maryland Natural Resources police shows a side-scan sonar being used in a search on the Chesapeake Bay in 2006. In recent years, the cost of such equipment has come down, allowing more local law enforcement departments to purchase it.
Chris Gardener AP

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 11:09 am

(This post was updated at 11 a.m. on Sept. 27.)

There's been a number of stories lately about astonishing discoveries by law enforcement using side-scan sonar.

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The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig To Retire After Next Season

Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig in 2011.
Patrick McDermott Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:53 pm

Baseball commissioner Bud Selig will retire after the 2014 season, Major League Baseball said on Thursday.

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All Songs Considered
3:34 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

The Good Listener: Does Using Spotify Make You A Bad Person?

Will listening to music streaming services land you here in the afterlife?

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid the online pharmacy's monthly supply of the pills that allow us to trudge productively through this waking life is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, an ethical query about online streaming services.

Andrea Sauceda writes via Facebook: "Does using Spotify (and/or other streaming services) make you a bad person?"

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Health
3:34 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Big Pharma And Meth Cooks Agree: Keep Cold Meds Over The Counter

Key methamphetamine ingredient pseudoephedrine is most easily found in cold and allergy medicines.
Ann Heisenfelt AP

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 5:11 pm

Millions of Americans have seen the fictional world of meth use and production in AMC's Breaking Bad, but journalist Jonah Engle has spent a lot of time in the real world of meth.

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Music Reviews
3:34 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Bumpy, Bikers And The Story Behind 'Leader Of The Pack'

The Shangri-Las on the cover of the "Leader of the Pack" single.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 4:48 pm

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The Salt
3:23 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Are Chefs On Competitive Diets Good Public Health Messengers?

Chef Mike Isabella, who owns three restaurants in Washington, D.C., came up with the Fit for Hope weight loss challenge for his peers in the restaurant industry.
Donald Bowers Getty Images Entertainment

Let's face it: In the popular imagination, the stereotypical chef has a large gut protruding from under his white double-breasted coat. And that stereotype is often accurate — by some estimates, 70 percent of chefs in the U.S. are overweight. Weight gain seems to be par for the course when you're spending your day tasting food and your late nights unwinding after a stressful dinner service.

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This Is NPR
2:56 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

It's Easy Bee-in' Green

Beekeeper Jeff Miller checks the hives on NPR's green roof.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 10:54 am

Shortly after NPR's busy staff moved into the new headquarters building at 1111 North Capitol Street, another, equally busy team, got settled on the roof. While they don't benefit from the space's state-of-the-art studio equipment and collaborative working spaces, they do appreciate the sunshine and sugar syrup. Frankly, they find the whole arrangement pretty sweet.

That's because they're honeybees.

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Television
2:50 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

'Masters Of Sex' Get Unmasterful Treatment On Showtime

Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan portray pioneering sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson in a new Showtime series.
Craig Blankenhorn Showtime

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:34 pm

Way back in the 1950s — before people tweeted snapshots of their privates or posted their hookup diaries online — it was considered inappropriate to talk too much about sex. The guardians of culture treated it as something better kept in the dark.

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The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Japan-Based Firms Will Plead Guilty To Price-Fixing Auto Parts

Nine Japan-based firms and two of its executives have agreed to plead guilty to fixing the prices of 30 products sold to U.S. car manufacturers, the Justice Department announced on Thursday.

The companies and executives have also agreed to pay more than $740 million in criminal fines for their role in the scheme.

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Parallels
2:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Even As It Criticizes The U.N., The U.S. Relies On It, Too

Iranian President Hasan Rouhani speaks at the United Nations on Tuesday. The U.S. and Iran are taking part in talks Thursday, looking for a possible breakthrough after years of negotiations on Iran's nuclear program.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:56 am

The United Nations has never been a model of efficiency. Critics denounce it as a pointless talking shop. President Obama and his U.N. ambassador, Samantha Power, have expressed reservations, if not outright frustration, with the world body.

Yet as the U.N. General Assembly holds its annual session, the U.S. has gone to the U.N. to address its two most pressing diplomatic challenges — Syria and Iran.

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