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Code Switch
12:38 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

The Overwhelming Nature Of Code-Switching

Matthew Salesses and his daughter, Grace, pose for a photo.
Daniel Salesses

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 11:49 am

Code-switching can be far from empowering. When I was 2 1/2, I was adopted from Korea. I went from one culture to another, one language to another. For me, code-switching wasn't a freedom, or a choice. It was a one-way street.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Veteran Storm Chaser Among Those Killed In Oklahoma

Tornado chaser Tim Samaras shows the probes he uses when trying to collect data from a tornado. This photo was taken May 26, 2006, in Ames, Iowa.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 2:46 pm

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Sun June 2, 2013

After Two Violent Days, Protesters In Turkey Return

Protesters clash with riot police between Taksim and Besiktas in Istanbul, on Sunday.
Gurcan Ozturk AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 3:00 pm

This morning central Istanbul was quiet. It was still reeling from two days of anti-government rallies that led to violent confrontations with police. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Turkey that some 900 people were arrested across the country and several hundred were wounded.

Peter said officials "are beginning to ask questions about who ordered the fierce police crackdown on peaceful demonstrators that triggered the massive anti-government reaction."

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This Is NPR
8:18 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Clairy Browne Loves NPR

Melissa Kuypers NPR

The Australian group Clairy Browne & the Bangin' Rackettes has a new album out in the United States called Baby Caught the Bus. While their sound has been pegged as everything from gospel to doo-wop, the group really defies the confines of a musical category.

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The Two-Way
7:45 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Wildfires Force Evacuations In California, New Mexico

Firefighters keep watch at Green Valley as the fire has burned more than 1,400 acres since Thursday in the Angeles National Forest just north of Castaic, in California.
Zhao Hanrong Xinhua /Landov

Wildfires in California and New Mexico forced the evacuation of hundreds of homes Saturday evening.

The Los Angeles Times has a riveting account of how the Powerhouse fire near a hydroelectric plant in Santa Clarita burned through a few homes.

Patty Robitaille, 61, was forced to leave her home. She grabbed a few documents, pictures and her pit bull. Then, she looked back: "Driving away, you could see the town burning up," she told the paper. "I don't think there's going to be much left."

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Author Interviews
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Searching High And Low For The 'American Spirit'

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:03 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Sports Chat: NBA, NHL Zero In On Finals Matches

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks to NPR's Mike Pesca about the week in sports.

Arts & Life
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Summer Travel Tips Of The Frugal Kind

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin gets some money-saving travel tips from Seth Kugel, who writes the Frugal Traveler column in The New York Times.

Latin America
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Defense Department To Produce Radio Novella In Columbia

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:45 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF A SONG)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing in foreign language)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Drug, guns, steamy romance. It is not called "El Cartel" for nothing.

(SOUNDBITE OF TELENOVELA, "EL CARTEL")

MARTIN: "El Cartel" was one of Colombia's top rated narco telenovelas, to TV soap operas that romanticized the country's drug cartels.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNSHOTS)

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Latin America
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Rare Gang Truce Disrupts Violence In Honduras

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 3:41 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When you think of the most dangerous places in the world, Syria or Afghanistan might come to mind. But Honduras has the highest murder rate in the world. Nearly 40 percent of the cocaine consumed globally passes through its borders. And the Central American country is home to thousands of gang members, many of whom got their start on U.S. city streets. Last week though, there was a hopeful development suggesting even the most hardened criminals may have had enough.

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History
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Reviving Eudora Welty's Account Of Medgar Evers

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:03 am

Eudora Welty's 1963 short story about the assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers will be published in its original form this weekend in the Mississippi newspaper The Clarion Ledger. Reporter Jerry Mitchell talks to Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin about its significance.

Author Interviews
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Author Recounts Growing Up In 'Fairyland'

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Childhood is a complicated journey for most of us: trying to fit in, trying to stand out; wanting to distance yourself from your parents one minute, wanting to grab onto them the next. Now on top of all that, imagine being raised by a single, gay father in the epicenter of the AIDS epidemic in the San Francisco of the 1980s. That was the frame of Alysia Abbott's childhood. She writes about it in her book. It is called "Fairyland: A Memoir of my Father."

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Around the Nation
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Washington Monument Receives Much-Needed Repair

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:36 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The National Mall might be known as America's front yard, but it's always something of a work in progress: buildings undergo facelifts, grass is patched and restored and millions of people continue to troop through, snapping photos. And now one of the biggest attractions is being covered up for repairs. NPR's Christopher Connelly has this report.

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The Sunday Conversation
6:06 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Mount Everest Climber Warns Of An Overpopulated Mountain

At 25,000 feet, this 1963 photo shows the push towards the summit of Everest.
Barry Bishop Courtesy National Geographic

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 1:56 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Perhaps no active climber is more closely associated with Mount Everest these days than Conrad Anker. He has reached the highest point on Earth three times, and he discovered the body of George Mallory — the British climber who may or may not have reached Everest's summit before disappearing in 1924.

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Parallels
5:49 am
Sun June 2, 2013

U.S. Tourists Become Israeli Commandos For A Day

Businessmen from Philadelphia practice with wooden cutouts of rifles at Caliber 3, a counter-terrorism training center amid Israeli settlements south of Jerusalem. Millions of tourists visit Israel each year and for those interested in Israel's security, for a price they can spend a few hours learning commando techniques.
Emiliy Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 8:29 am

After two hours of yelling, shooting and getting tough with a group of American businessmen one hot spring afternoon, Steve Gar turned to storytelling.

Gar is an instructor at Caliber3, a private counterterrorism training center in an Israeli settlement area south of Jerusalem that offers short shooting courses for tourists. Wrapping up the Americans' two-hour session, he called them all to gather around.

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Parallels
5:40 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Nodding Syndrome: A Devastating Medical Mystery In Uganda

Most of the children in the nodding syndrome ward at the Atanga Health Center in the Pader district in Uganda are severe cases, who first showed symptoms as early as 2002, or children who have been neglected by their parents. Staffers here treat these patients with a generic anti-convulsant drug called sodium valproate. They also provide the children and their caretakers with food.
Matthew Kielty for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:11 am

It starts with the nodding — otherwise normal children begin to nod their heads, pathologically. Then come the seizures. The children stop growing and stop talking. Ultimately, the disease wrecks the children, physically and mentally.

The strange and deadly illness known as nodding syndrome affects only children, and only in a small pocket of East Africa. It has affected more than 3,000 children since the late 1990s, when it first appeared in what was then southern Sudan. And for more than three years, the cause of nodding syndrome has eluded epidemiologists around the globe.

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Parallels
5:24 am
Sun June 2, 2013

A City Of Assad Supporters In War-Ravaged Syria

The port city of Tartous is in a region loyal to President Bashar Assad. The city has been a refuge for supporters to vacation and seek work.
Steve Inskeep NPR

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 2:33 pm

Many people in Syria are accustomed to the sound of daily gunfire. It is normal in battle-scarred cities like Damascus or Qusair.

But along the beaches and in the cafes of Tartous, an area that is a center of support for the embattled President Bashar Assad, the sounds are a bit more peaceful.

Near the water's edge of the Mediterranean, tables, chairs and umbrellas sit upon huge stones. At one of these tables sits a brother and sister on vacation.

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Music Interviews
5:22 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Quadron: For Love Of The Slow Jam

Quadron is the duo of Robin Hannibal and Coco O. Their new album is called Avalanche.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:33 am

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It's All Politics
5:21 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Ted Cruz: 'The New Voice' Of The GOP?

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, accompanied by Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., speaks during a news conference with Tea Party leaders on May 16. Bachmann, chairwoman of the Tea Party Caucus, announced this week she won't seek re-election. Meanwhile, Cruz's fortunes continue to soar.
Molly Riley AP

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 10:56 am

On the same day this week that House Tea Party Caucus co-founder Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., announced she won't seek re-election, the fortunes of another Tea Party favorite continued to soar.

Freshman GOP Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas headlined a big fundraiser thrown by the New York Republican Party in the heart of Manhattan. More than 600 Republicans gathered to write checks to their struggling party, which has no statewide officeholders.

But it was not exactly a welcoming committee that awaited Cruz outside the Grand Hyatt hotel.

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Education
5:20 am
Sun June 2, 2013

If Employment Game Has Changed, Who's Teaching The Rules?

Students aren't getting the advice they need to be successful, according to Anthony Carnevale, director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 1:31 pm

It still pays to earn a college degree. That is, if you get the right one. Georgetown University published a report Wednesday that looked into this dilemma.

"The labor market demands more specialization. So, the game has changed," says Anthony Carnevale, the report's co-author and director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce.

Carnevale says students probably aren't choosing the right degrees because they haven't been given the right guidance.

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