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The Two-Way
5:31 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

'Atari Dump' Will Be Excavated, After Nearly 30 Years

The "Atari Dump" of New Mexico, where the game company rid itself of unsold game cartridges, will be excavated this summer. Here, a file photo shows a woman demonstrating Atari's unreleased 1984 Mindlink device, using a headband that picks up impulses from movement of the player's forehead.
Charlie Knoblock AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:59 pm

The New Mexico landfill or "Atari Dump" where the game console maker buried its mistakes — the biggest being the game E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — will be dug up by game developer Fuel Industries, which hopes to make a documentary about the project.

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Planet Money
5:15 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

All The Wealth We Lost And Regained Since The Recession Started

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 7:47 pm

American households lost roughly $16 trillion in net worth since the recession started in 2007. According to the latest Fed data, we regained about $14.6 trillion, or roughly 91 percent, of it. But let's not break out the champagne glasses just yet.

A new report from the St. Louis Fed shows that, after adjusting those numbers for inflation and normalizing them for population growth, we recovered less than half of what we've lost in wealth.

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Remembering Heroes Of The Second World War
5:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Army Nurse Mildred Manning: An 'Angel' POW With A Job To Do

Mildred Manning, then Mildred Dalton, was serving as a U.S. Army nurse in the Philippines when she was taken prisoner by Japanese forces in 1942.
U.S. Army

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who died this year.

There were no "typical" tours of duty in World War II, but U.S. Army nurse Mildred Dalton Manning's was particularly extraordinary. Manning, along with six dozen other nurses, was held captive by the Japanese for almost three years. The group became known as the "Angels of Bataan and Corregidor."

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Author Interviews
5:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Sex Overseas: 'What Soldiers Do' Complicates WWII History

Cover of What Soldiers Do

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Americans often think of World War II as the "good war," but historian Mary Louise Roberts says her new book might make our understanding of that conflict "more truthful and more complex." The book, What Soldiers Do: Sex and the American GI in World War II France, tells the story of relations between American men and French women in Normandy and elsewhere.

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Piano Jazz With Jon Weber
5:02 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Linda Oh On Piano Jazz

Linda Oh.
Vincent Soyez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:21 pm

With the bass, "you have a lot more power than you may think," Linda Oh says. Born in Malaysia to Chinese parents, her family moved to Western Australia, where she started out playing bass in rock bands. Since discovering the double bass, Oh become a steady presence on the scene, whether playing with a string quartet, composing for film or covering the Red Hot Chili Peppers, which she does here with "Soul to Squeeze" in a set with host Jon Weber.

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Mountain Stage
4:51 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Glen Phillips On Mountain Stage

Glen Phillips.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 1:06 pm

Singer-songwriter Glen Phillips makes his fifth appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia Wesleyan College in Buckhannon. To many, Phillips is best known for his work with Toad the Wet Sprocket, the hit-making pop band he founded when he was just 14. But after the group broke up in the '90s, he immediately went on to work with some of the most respected names in roots music, notably the members of Nickel Creek (along with Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones) as The Mutual Admiration Society.

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Monkey See
4:39 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Rita Wilson On Life After 50: 'Get Ready, It's A Blast'

Rita Wilson, seen here performing in March, is the editor-at-large of the Huff/Post50 section of The Huffington Post.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

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The Two-Way
4:14 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Turkish Police, Anti-Government Protesters Clash

Demonstrators flee from a water cannon during clashes with riot police Friday during a protest against the demolition of Taksim Gezi Park, in Taksim Square in Istanbul.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:03 pm

Turkish police in Istanbul used tear gas and water cannons to break up what are being described as the worst anti-government protests in years.

Reuters reports:

"Thousands of demonstrators massed on streets surrounding Istanbul's central Taksim Square, long a venue for political unrest, while protests erupted in the capital Ankara and the Aegean coastal city of Izmir."

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Movie Reviews: What 'After Earth' And 'Kings' Have In Common

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Two movies open today that at first glance have little in common, the science fiction blockbuster "After Earth" and the suburban indie comedy "Kings of Summer." Leave it to our critic Bob Mondello to find similarities.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Missile Shipment To Syria Complicates Kerry's Push For Peace

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. With the civil war raging in Syria, the U.S. and Russia are making another attempt to get on the same page about how to stop it. Diplomats meet in Geneva next week to try to salvage plans for a June peace conference. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, have run into problems ever since they announced that conference.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Week In Politics: Taking Stock Of Obama, GOP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, our Friday politics session with columnists E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and David Brooks of the New York Times. Good to see you both.

DAVID BROOKS: Good to see you.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

What Was Your Worst Vacation Ever?

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Perhaps you are one of the lucky ones, and you've never had your holiday plans spoiled by unforeseen events: bad weather, misplaced reservations. But if you haven't been so lucky, then you may have...

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Vacation horror stories. Nothing tragic, just a cascade of annoyances, a series of unfortunate happenings that ruined a holiday dream but with the passage of time made a swell story.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Olympian Bestowed 9-Year-Old Gold Medal

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Nearly nine years after the Athens Summer Olympic Games, American shot putter Adam Nelson has been declared a winner at those games. NPR's Tom Goldman has the story of an Olympic dream come true at last.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Baseball's 'Doc' Gooden Pitches A Cautionary Tale

Mets phenom Dwight Gooden pitches at New York's Shea Stadium on May 6, 1984.
Ray Stubblebine AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 10:26 pm

For New York Mets fans, 1986 was a glorious year. The Mets won an epic seven-game World Series against the Boston Red Sox.

Millions turned out for a raucous parade through Lower Manhattan the next day. One man conspicuously absent from the celebrations was Dwight Gooden, the Mets' 21-year-old star pitcher, who had a blistering fastball and nasty curve.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Latest Economic Forecast: A Whole Lot Of 'Meh'

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We knew it couldn't last. We've been reporting some good news about the economy lately. The housing market has been doing quite well. Unemployment is high, but it's been falling. But today, the government released some key economic data and it suggests things are not quite as good as they seemed. Adam Davidson with NPR's Planet Money team joins us to explain. And, Adam, what did we learn today?

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Weekend Hockey Finals To Be A Battle Of Champions

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. The weather is heating up across much of the country, and that must mean it's time get really serious when it comes to ice hockey. Just four teams remain in pursuit of the Stanley Cup. They are the Pittsburgh Penguins, the Boston Bruins, the Chicago Blackhawks and the Los Angles Kings. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins us now to talk about the National Hockey League semifinals. Hi, Stefan.

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It's All Politics
4:10 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Romney Not Done With Politics

Former Massachusetts governor and 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md., in March.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Mitt Romney may have lost the biggest prize in American politics last year, but that doesn't mean he's left the game for good.

While there's no evidence to suggest he's interested in a third consecutive run for the White House, the man who topped the 2012 Republican national ticket is signaling his intent to play a role in the 2014 midterm election.

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The Two-Way
3:56 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Report Of Liquid Woolly Mammoth Blood Prompts Clone Talk

A file photo from 2011 shows a man touching a giant bronze sculpture of a mammoth in the Siberian city of Khanty-Mansiysk. A team of Russian and South Korean scientists who found a well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth carcass this month say it also included blood.
Natalia Kolesnikova AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:38 pm

Scientists in Siberia say they've extracted blood samples from the carcass of a 10,000-year-old woolly mammoth, reviving speculation that a clone of the extinct animal might someday walk the earth, if scientists are able to find living cells. But researchers say the find, which also included well-preserved muscle tissue, must be studied further to know its potential.

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Code Switch
3:20 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Desis Dominate The National Spelling Bee

Arvind Mahankali won the 2013 National Spelling Bee after spelling the word "knaidel."
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:48 pm

When Arvind Mahankali won the Scripps-Howard National Spelling Bee last night, he became the sixth consecutive Indian-American winner and the 11th in the past 15 years.

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From Scratch
2:59 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Devi Shetty, Founder Of Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital

Host Jessica Harris speaks with Devi Shetty, a cardiac surgeon and founder of the Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital in Bangalore, India. Through its scalable, low cost model, the hospital is able to treat patients who otherwise could not afford health care.

Harris also speaks with Peter Manning, the founder of Peter Manning/Five.

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