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5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

IOC Reinstates Wrestling To Summer Olympics

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Oh, the sport of wrestling was given a reprieve by an International Olympic Committee. The question here is which sports will be part of the 2020 and 2024 Summer Games, and we're delighted to tell you that wrestling beat out squash as well as a combined bid by baseball and softball for inclusion. It's a happy outcome for wrestling, but there are questions about whether the selection process served the goal of breathing new life into the games. NPR's Mike Pesca is in Bueonos Aires where IOC members are meeting. He has this report.

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

White House Officials Keep Up Pressure For Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

President Obama is set to address the nation about Syria on Tuesday night. Will the president be able to sway public opinion on limited strikes in Syria?

NPR Story
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power Presses For Strikes On Syria

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

We're joined next by one of the advocates of using military force in Syria. Samantha Power is the new American ambassador to the United Nations. She joins us from New York during this week when Congress will debate a possible strike on Syria. Ambassador, welcome to the program.

AMBASSADOR SAMANTHA POWER: Thank you, Steve.

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Sky's The Limit For Limited Edition Pokemon Card

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Trading cards.

More than 400 people have bid on a rare Pokemon card on eBay with a buy it now price of $100,000.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The limited edition card - a Pikachu illustrator - is one of six in circulation. It was originally created as a prize for those who won a Pokemon Card Game Illustration contest.

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

How Many Lives Does 'One Life To Live' Have?

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Oh this is terrible, the soap opera "One Life to Live" may have run out of lives. The company that took the show online recently announced that it is suspending production.

NPR's Sam Sanders tells us why.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: This is not the first time "One Life to Live" has been on life support. In 2011, ABC cancelled the show, because of low ratings. But, earlier this year, new episodes of "One Life to Live" came to the Internet - on Hulu - with a snappy new theme song featuring Snoop Dogg.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

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NPR Story
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Verizon, FCC Go To Court Over Net Neutrality

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Opening statements in the court case FCC vs. Verizon begin Monday. This case could determine the FCC's legal ability to enforce the principle known as net neutrality. At issue is whether the federal government may block Internet service providers from slowing or blocking certain online content.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Luxury Retailer Neiman Marcus Could Be Sold

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Neiman Marcus almost closing the sale.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The luxury retailer is said to be close to an agreement to sell itself - for $6 billion. The Wall Street Journal reports Ares Management and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board are the joint interested parties looking to make the deal.

Around the Nation
3:31 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Trail Life USA, The 'Other' Boy Scouts Of America

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:49 pm

A new faith-based group for boys is taking shape, just three months after the Boy Scouts of America decided to change its membership policy to allow gay youth to join.

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All Tech Considered
3:30 am
Mon September 9, 2013

It's OK To Protest In China, Just Don't March

Security guards stand outside newspaper offices in Guangdong province in January, where banners and flowers were laid in protest of censorship.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:12 pm

Thousands of messages posted on the Internet every day in China get censored. Until now, little has been known about how the Chinese censorship machine works — except that it is comprehensive.

"It probably is the largest effort ever to selectively censor human expression," says Harvard University social scientist Gary King. "They don't censor everything. There are millions of Chinese [who] talk about millions of things. But the effort to prune the Internet of certain kinds of information is unprecedented."

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Parallels
3:29 am
Mon September 9, 2013

How To Build An Afghan Army, In A Million Difficult Steps

Afghan soldiers and contractors are taught about the workings of a diesel-powered electrical generator at Forward Operating Base Nolay in Helmand province.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:57 pm

It's 8 a.m. on a recent day at Forward Operating Base Nolay, a small Marine outpost in Taliban-infested Sangin District of southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. The Marines are in the process of caffeinating and preparing for the day.

Suddenly, explosions and gunfire ring out. The Marines don't run for their weapons or bunkers for that matter. They don't even flinch.

"We can sit here and we can have a cup of coffee when there's booms going on, we're not concerned about it," says Lt. Col. Jonathan Loney.

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Shots - Health News
3:28 am
Mon September 9, 2013

From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

We may not see them, but we need them.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 1:58 pm

Look in the mirror and you won't see your microbiome. But it's there with you from the day you are born. Over time, those bacteria, viruses and fungi multiply until they outnumber your own cells 10 to 1.

As babies, the microbes may teach our immune systems how to fight off bad bugs that make us sick and ignore things that aren't a threat.

We get our first dose of microbes from our mothers, both in the birth canal and in breast milk. Family members tend to have similar microbiomes.

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The Two-Way
3:28 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Obama Presses Lawmakers For Authorization On Syria

Vice President Joe Biden stands in front of his residence at the Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, as President Obama arrives at a dinner Biden is hosting for Republican senators.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:02 pm

President Obama is ratcheting up pressure on lawmakers to support his request for limited U.S. military strikes in Syria. The White House says the Syrian government is responsible for a chemical weapons attack last month near the capital, Damascus.

On Sunday night, the president stopped by a dinner Vice President Joe Biden was holding for Republican senators.

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The Two-Way
1:48 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Football Fan Dies At Candlestick Park

Fans tailgate outside Candlestick Park in 2012.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:17 am

An unidentified man fell to his death Sunday during the San Francisco 49ers' home opener at Candlestick Park.

He reportedly fell from the Jamestown walkway, which goes around the outside of the San Francisco area stadium.

Witnesses say the man appeared to be intoxicated.

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The Two-Way
7:45 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

Serena Williams Wins Fifth U.S. Open Title

Serena Williams holds up the championship trophy after defeating Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the women's singles final of the 2013 U.S. Open tennis tournament on Sunday in New York.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 9:44 pm

Top-seeded Serena Williams overcame the wind and more than a dozen unforced errors Sunday to defeat No. 2 Victoria Azarenka of Belarus, in the U.S. Open women's singles championship match 7-5, 6-7(6), 6-1.

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The U.S. Response To Syria
6:32 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

How Could A Drought Spark A Civil War?

Farmers ride in their tractor in the drought-hit region of Hasaka in northeastern Syria on June 17, 2010.
Louai Beshara AFP/Getty Images

The background of the Syrian conflict can seem obscure to outsiders, but the spark that started it all is often traced back to the city of Dara'a, in February of 2011.

A group of young people writing Arab Spring protest slogans on a wall are arrested and beaten.

"When that news broke there was a massive demonstration on the street, and that was the first spark one can call of the Syrian uprising," Nayan Chanda tells NPR's Jacki Lyden.

But long before a single shot was fired in Syria, there was drought in Dara'a, laying the groundwork for social unrest.

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Humans
5:33 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

From The Fall Of Failure, Success Can Take Flight

Members of S. A. Andrée's 1897 journey survey their downed vessel. This photo was recovered from a camera when their remains were found 33 years later.
Courtesy of Grenna Museum, Andréexpeditionen Polarcenter/Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography/National Geographic

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 6:26 pm

Diana Nyad's successful swim from Cuba to Key West on Monday was made all the sweeter because she had tried — and failed — four times before.

She learned you should "never, ever give up," but she also learned some practical lessons to help beat the elements in those earlier attempts. Out of failure, she innovated. And out of innovation, she succeeded.

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Animals
5:33 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

Hired Hog Trapper Has Three Years To Clean Out Dallas

Feral hogs were once just a rural problem in Texas, but now they threaten to turn city parks into sties.
Courtesy City Trapping

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 6:26 pm

Texas has a pig problem.

Wild hogs have overrun the state so rapidly that in 2011, Texas allowed them to be hunted all year round. The feral hog epidemic even spawned a reality show called Aporkalypse Now, following Ted Nugent as he shoots hogs from a helicopter.

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Animals
5:33 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

Answering The Cranes' Call: 40 Years Of Preserving Grace

Mated pairs of red-crowned cranes perform a "unison call," a complex and extended series of calls between the male and female that reinforces the pair bond.
Sture Traneving

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 6:26 pm

Of all the world's birds, perhaps none are more mystical than cranes.

From Asia to North America, these tall birds with haunting cries have been woven into paintings, literature and folk tales. But today, 10 of the world's 15 crane species are threatened, and some are on the brink of extinction.

Their grass and wetland habitats are devastated all over the world. The International Crane Foundation, based in Wisconsin, has been studying and advocating for the birds for 40 years. George Archibald founded it with another young ornithologist on a family farm near Baraboo.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:33 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

Banjos, Bartók And La Belle Époque: New Classical Albums

Caleb Burhans debut album as a composer is called Evensong.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 12:34 pm

People ask why I thrive on classical music, and I tell them it's all about discovery. The possibilities for finding incredible music, both old and new, are endless as the oceans.

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NPR Story
4:52 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

After Years Of War, Rebuilding Iraq's Libraries

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 6:26 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

If you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Coming up, the art of embracing failure.

But first, reading and learning have been enshrined in Baghdad's storied libraries for centuries. Some were destroyed by Mongol invaders hundreds of years ago, but more recently, the war in Iraq savaged the country's libraries. Looting and burning left many of them emptied of books and patrons.

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