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The Two-Way
6:23 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Time Warner And CBS Reach Deal To End Programming Blackout

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:07 am

Time Warner Cable announced Monday that the company has reached a deal with CBS over a contract dispute that had left several major cities blacked out from CBS programming since Aug. 2.

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The Salt
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Tlacoyos: A Mexican Grilled Snack That Tempted The Conquistadors

Tlacoyos can be filled with beans, potatoes, mushrooms or cheese and are often topped with grilled cactus, onions, cilantro, and salsa.
Jasmine Garsd for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 2:10 pm

For the last in a summer series of grilled food from around the world, we head to Mexico, where a small doughy treat is found everywhere from street corner grills to high-end restaurants. It's called a tlacoyo (pronounced tla-COY-yo) and although it may sound novel, it's an ancient food that's older than Hernan Cortes.

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NPR Story
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

On Fifth Try, Diana Nyad Completes Cuba-Florida Swim

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:48 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

After years of unwavering tenacity, Diana Nyad has completed her quest. At 64 years of age, she became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage. That is more than a hundred miles of water full of sharks, venomous box jellyfish and treacherous currents.

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NPR Story
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Verizon To Pay $130 Billion For Stake In Vodafone

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 7:11 pm

Verizon Communications is paying $130 billion to buy part of its wireless unit from the British company Vodafone. It's one of the biggest deals in the history of the telecommunications business and underscores the growing profitability of wireless. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli about the deal.

NPR Story
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Falling For Autumn Movies

Sandra Bullock winds up adrift in Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity.
Warner Brothers Pictures

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:37 am

If you just look at the box office grosses, rather than the bottom line, you'd swear Hollywood was closing the books this weekend on a sensational summer — more than $4.5 billion in the till, a couple of hundred million dollars higher than any summer on record.

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NPR Story
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Splashing In New York's Hudson River

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 7:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In New York, some people are working to revive an old form of summertime recreation: the river pool. For 60 years, starting in 1870, New York's Hudson and East Rivers were lined with floating pools. Overheated urbanites came by the thousands to swim safely in the currents. But eventually, water pollution forced the pools to close. Well, Jim O'Grady of member station WNYC reports on the effort to bring them back.

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NPR Story
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Syria Turmoil Threatens Israel-Palestinian Talks

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 10:11 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

Peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians picked up again over the weekend. U.S. envoy Martin Indyk joined talks yesterday for the first time since those negotiations resumed in July. No word from the State Department on the details of that meeting.

Meantime, as NPR's Emily Harris reports, a fatal incident in a West Bank refugee camp has added new tension to the peace process.

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The Two-Way
4:30 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Syria's Bashar Assad: Show Me The Evidence

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:11 am

A defiant Syrian President Bashar Assad said Monday that the international community has not produced evidence to substantiate claims that his regime used chemical weapons in a deadly attack last month.

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Author Interviews
4:14 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

From Peace To Patriotism: The Shifting Identity Of 'God Bless America'

American composer Irving Berlin sings his song "God Bless America" in front of Boy Scouts troop members and spectators gathered at a tent in Monticello, New York in 1940. Instead of collecting royalties from "God Bless America," Berlin created a fund that collected and distributed them to the Boy and Girl Scouts.
Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:47 am

In the fall of 1938, radio was huge. That Halloween, Orson Welles scared listeners out of their wits with his War of the Worlds. And on November 10, 1938 — the eve of the holiday that was known then as Armistice Day — the popular singer Kate Smith made history on her radio show. She sang a song that had never been sung before, written by the composer Irving Berlin.

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Food
4:12 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Deep-Fry Chefs Keep It Hot And Poppin' In Texas

We had to do it! A fried mic.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 7:11 pm

Every year, the State Fair of Texas awards the most original food that is battered and plunged into a vat of boiling oil.

And it gets weirder every year. The obvious choices came and went in previous competitions — concoctions such as fried ice cream, fried cookie dough and chicken-fried bacon. Now, every year, the same cooks have to top themselves, which is not easy.

Last year, Butch Benavides — a Mexican food restaurateur turned fry-master — won a trophy for his fried bacon cinnamon roll on a stick.

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All Tech Considered
4:12 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Amish Community Not Anti-Technology, Just More Thoughtful

One Amish family in Lancaster County, Pa., has three horse-pulled buggies they store in a barn. They all have electric lights powered by rechargeable batteries. One of the buggies even has battery-powered windshield wipers.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 7:11 pm

Many outsiders assume the Amish reject all new technology. But that's not true.

One Amish man in Lancaster County, Pa., checks his voicemail about four times a day. His shop is equipped with a propane-powered forklift, hydraulic-powered saws, cordless drills, and a refrigerated tank where milk from dairy cows is stored.

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NPR Story
4:07 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Nothing Went As Expected At The Box Office This Summer

(Roloff/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:55 pm

This has been the summer of some spectacular bombs at the box office, most notably “The Lone Ranger.”

But receipts overall were up. In fact, the box office gross is expected to set a record of $4.7 billion and films like “The Heat” and “The Conjuring” did surprisingly big business.

We look at the summer that was with Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr.

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NPR Story
4:07 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Diana Nyad 1st To Complete Cuba-To-Florida Swim Without Shark Cage

U.S. swimmer Diana Nyad, 64, begins her swim to Florida from the waters off Havana, Cuba, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013. (Ramon Espinosa/AP)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:55 pm

Note: Now that Nyad has reached shore, we have removed the live video stream.

Update 2:02 p.m.: She made it. On her fifth try, American swimmer Diana Nyad has become the first to swim to Florida from Cuba without a shark cage. She arrived this afternoon in Key West, where a crowd had gathered on the beach to see her achieve what Nyad called a “lifelong dream.”

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NPR Story
4:07 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Audio Postcard From Three Midwest State Fairs

Carnival rides are a staple of Midwest state fairs. (Screenshot from Harvest Public Media)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:55 pm

State fairs in Maryland, Alaska, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, South Dakota, Minnesota and Michigan wrap up today.

Harvest Public Media reporters Amy Mayer, Abbie Fentress Swanson, Bill Wheelhouse and Jeremy Bernfeld sent us this audio postcard from the state fairs in Iowa, Missouri and Illinois.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

A Push To Bridge The Gap Between Soldiers And Citizens

Members of the armed forces arrive for the national anthem before the baseball game between the Detroit Tigers and the Pittsburgh Pirates in Detroit, May 27, 2013. (Carlos Osorio/AP)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:55 pm

An enormous gap has opened between the all-volunteer U.S. military and the citizens of the country it serves, according to a new book by military analyst Andrew Bacevich, Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country” (excerpt below).

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Sen. Leahy: Senators 'Very, Very Wary' Of Syria Strike

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., is pictured July 31, 2013. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:55 pm

Vermont Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy says the evidence of the Syria regime’s use of chemical weapons is convincing, but the administration faces a Congress worried about military intervention.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Enough With Baby Talk; Infants Learn From Lemur Screeches, Too

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:26 am

New research suggests that 3-month-old human babies can use lemur calls as teaching aids. The findings hint at a deep biological connection between language and learning.

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

On Fifth Try, Diana Nyad Completes Cuba-Florida Swim

United States endurance swimmer Diana Nyad is greeted by a crowd as she walks on to the Key West, Fla., shore today.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 9:59 pm

Updated At 2:06 pm EST. Nyad Reaches Key West:

Jellyfish stings, an asthma attack and sheer exhaustion all stopped Diana Nyad in the past. But on her fifth try, the 64-year-old Nyad became the first person to swim unaided from Cuba to Florida, a distance of more than 100 miles.

With a cheering crowd greeting her on the beach in Key West, Nyad swam ashore Monday afternoon after more than two full days in the water. The swim began Saturday morning when she jumped off a seawall at the Hemingway Marina in Havana.

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Music Interviews
11:03 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Jason Isbell Locates His Musical Compass On 'Southeastern'

Jason Isbell was previously a member of Drive-By Truckers. His solo albums include Sirens of the Ditch and Here We Rest.
Eric England Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 2:26 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 17, 2013.

When singer-songwriter Jason Isbell used to get drunk, he'd sometimes tell his then-girlfriend, the musician Amanda Shires, that he needed to quit the bottle — and that if it was going to take, he'd have to go to rehab. Eventually, she said the next time he told her that, she'd hold him to it. And she did. And he went. And, he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "The jury is still out on whether or not it worked, but it worked today and all the days leading up to this."

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World Cafe
10:15 am
Mon September 2, 2013

The Black Keys On World Cafe

The Black Keys.
Danny Clinch Courtesy of Warner Bros.

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 2:31 pm

Welcome to the first in our weekly Vintage Cafe series of interviews from the archive. Each week we are going to be re-visiting significant session with major artists. For this installment, we bring back our Black Keys session, recorded in December 2011 right before the release of El Camino.

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