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Africa
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Checkpoints And Curfews Complicate Life For Egyptians

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:22 pm

During the 2011 uprising in Egypt, police disappeared from the streets and were replaced by neighborhood watch committees. The groups have re-emerged during the violent stand-off between Egypt's military rulers and Islamist supporters of deposed President Morsi and people are reporting incidents of theft and harassment at checkpoints.

Middle East
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Pakistan's Former President Charged In Benazir Bhutto Murder

Pakistan's former military ruler Pervez Musharraf has been charged with murder in the assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. Musharraf is back in Pakistan after a self-imposed exile. He denies the charges. Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at The Atlantic Council, speaks with Melissa Block about the implications of the case.

Around the Nation
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Crews Battling Massive Idaho Fire Settle In For A Long Fight

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Fire managers in Idaho say they may be turning the corner on a massive wildfire near the resort towns of Ketchum and Sun Valley. The Beaver Creek fire has caused more than 11-and-a-half million dollars and forced mandatory evacuations of more than 2,000 homes. Sadie Babits of Boise State Public Radio reports.

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Education
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

What's Behind The Turnaround At Miami Public Schools?

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

For years, Miami-Dade County Public Schools faced problems common to many urban schools: low attendance, high dropout rates, poor grades. But since 2008, Alberto Carvalho has been in charge of the nation's fourth largest school district, and there've been some noticeable improvements in Miami schools. More students are graduating, fewer are dropping out, test scores are up and the district's budget crisis has faded.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez has this profile of the man some call a miracle worker.

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Around the Nation
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Calls Continue For San Diego Mayor To Step Down

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

San Diego's embattled mayor Bob Filner has wrapped up a second day of closed-door mediation to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit. Meanwhile, the debate continues among the city's voters about what should happen to the mayor. NPR's Nathan Rott reports while many want to see Filner resign, others are pleading for patience.

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Animals
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

More Seals Means More Great White Sharks In Cape Cod

Great white sharks are becoming a more common sight along the East Coast. Beach closures are not unusual along Cape Cod, but most beach-goers are taking the new threat in stride.

Law
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Prosecution Rests In Court Martial Of Maj. Nidal Hasan

The prosecution has wrapped up its case against the former psychiatrist accused of opening fire at Fort Hood, killing 13 people. Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is representing himself, will present his case beginning tomorrow.

Law
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

With Pot Legal In Washington, Will Buyers Stay Underground?

Seattle law enforcement's mellow attitude toward pot was on display at this year's annual Hempfest, where the cops were at the gate β€” handing out bags of Doritos.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:25 pm

In Washington state, regulators are putting the finishing touches on rules for the new state-sanctioned recreational marijuana market. And the man hired to help shape those rules is raising a warning to local law enforcement: toughen up on the black market.

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National Security
5:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Patriot Act Architect Criticizes NSA's Data Collection

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

On this side of the Atlantic, the debate over the Snowden leaks and the NSA data sweeps have revealed renewed civil liberties concerns and criticism of the Patriot Act. A key provision of the act known as Section 215 allows investigators to seek business records or, quote, "any tangible things as long as they are relevant to a counter terror investigation." It's a mile-wide definition and the legal foundation that the Obama administration has used to justify its mass collection of Americans' phone logs.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

More College Students Rely On Federal Aid, Study Says

For the first time, a majority of students got federal help to attend college, according to a new U.S. survey. Here, people walk on the Columbia University campus in July.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The percentage of U.S. undergrads who rely on the federal government for financial aid soared above 50 percent in the most recent survey from the National Center for Education Statistics. The data show that for the first time, a majority of students got federal help.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports for our Newscast unit:

"The new figures from the National Center for Education Statistics shows that from 2007 to 2011, the percentage of undergraduate students who depend on federal loans and grants jumped from 47 percent to 57 percent.

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Mountain Stage
4:55 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Amanda Shires On Mountain Stage

Amanda Shires performs with her husband, Jason Isbell, on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:07 pm

Amanda Shires makes her second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.V. A gifted fiddler and singer-songwriter, Shires got her start in Texas, where as a teenager she performed with the Texas Playboys, the backing band for the legendary Bob Wills. Shires eventually relocated to Nashville, where she found herself backing Americana heavyweights Todd Snider, Justin Townes Earle and, perhaps most notably, Jason Isbell.

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All Tech Considered
4:43 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

How Vine Settled On 6 Seconds

About a year since launching, Vine says it has more than 40 million registered users.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 8:53 pm

Six seconds isn't a lot of time. If you were to read this sentence out loud, by the time you finished, six seconds would be up. But the brevity of Vine, the app that lets users make and share six-second video clips, has attracted 40 million registered users since its January 2013 launch.

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Planet Money
4:12 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Pregnant? It's OK To Have A Glass Of Wine*

Pregnant.
Olivier Lantzendorffer iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:21 pm

*According to an economist.

In her new book Expecting Better, economist and new mom Emily Oster parses the evidence behind all the recommendations given to pregnant women. She argues that, as an economist, she's trained to both examine evidence and think about trade-offs.

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The Salt
4:07 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

'Treme' Cookbook Captures The Flavor Of A Show And A City

Microwave pralines are easier to make than stovetop pralines, and just as tasty.
Ed Anderson Chronicle Books

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 11:34 am

If you find yourself craving New Orleans food, you could go there and melt in the sweltering heat for a dose of gumbo or praline bacon. Or you could settle in on your couch, as I've been doing, and torture yourself watching reruns of the HBO series Treme. It's set in post-Katrina New Orleans and, along with the music, it puts the city's food on center stage.

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NPR Story
3:54 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Tell Me More's Twitter Education Special

NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:32 am

  • Listen to the Education Special

Education has long been referred to as a civil right in this country β€” including by Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama and by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Nearly 50 years ago, King said:

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Shots - Health News
3:50 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Study Finds No Link Between Hallucinogens And Mental Problems

Don't fear the 'shrooms.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

How risky are psychedelic drugs to mental health? Not nearly as much as you might have imagined.

People who had taken LSD, psilocybin (the brain-bending chemical in magic mushrooms) or mescaline at any time in their lives were no more likely than those who hadn't to wind up in mental health treatment or to have symptoms of mental illness, according to an analysis by some Norwegian researchers.

And there was some evidence that people who had taken the drugs at some point were less likely to have had recent mental health treatment.

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Books News & Features
3:42 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Elmore Leonard, The 'Dickens Of Detroit,' Dies At 87

In his home library, Leonard kept copies of every book he'd ever written.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:22 pm

The writer Elmore Leonard has died. He was 87 years old and had recently suffered a stroke.

For decades, Leonard β€” working at the very top of his profession as a crime writer β€” had been widely acclaimed, and universally read. He published 46 novels, which resulted in countless movie and TV adaptations, including the movies Out of Sight and Get Shorty and the TV series Justified.

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The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

A Day With Elmore Leonard And The White Castle That Wasn't

Elmore Leonard's writing desk at his home in Bloomfield Village, just outside Detroit. He wrote each page of his books by hand on canary yellow paper.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:14 pm

Upon hearing news of the death of Elmore Leonard, NPR correspondent and former All Things Considered co-host Noah Adams recalls a day he spent with the crime writer in his hometown.

Three years ago, I rode with Elmore Leonard in the back of a rental car to see Detroit and remember what it once was. Much of it was sadly puzzling to him, especially the empty space where Tiger Stadium had been.

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NPR Story
3:08 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Chicago Rocked By Spate Of Shootings

(voteprime/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:13 pm

Five people were shot last night in an uptown Chicago neighborhood

The shootings took place in broad daylight outside a church during prayer service, ironically along a so-called safe passage route.

One victim, shot in the head, remains in critical condition. The others are all stable.

The shootings come on the heels of a weekend shooting spree that killed one and left another eight injured, including a seven-year-old, in the city’s south, west and southwest.

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NPR Story
3:08 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Olympian Edwin Moses Helps Kids Clear Their Own Hurdles

Edwin Moses jumps a hurdle on his way to winning the gold medal in the 400-meter hurdles in Los Angeles, August 5, 1984. (AP)

Originally published on Sat August 24, 2013 1:22 pm

Edwin Moses was one of the best ever at clearing hurdles on the track.

Now, the two-time Olympic gold medal winner is helping kids in underserved neighborhoods clear their own hurdles.

Moses is chairman of the Laureus Sport For Good Foundation, which supports the training and placement of coaches in sports-based youth development programs in U.S. cities.

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