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Politics
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Floor Charts A Key Part Of Congressional Messaging

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:02 pm

Watch C-SPAN long enough and you'll see members of Congress using big visual aids, known by Capitol insiders as floor charts. We explore where the charts come from and how they've become an essential part of congressional messaging. (This piece originally aired on Morning Edition on July 23.)

Shots - Health News
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Getting People Out Of Nursing Homes Turns Out To Be Complicated

Dorothy Holmes, back home with her new dog, Jack.
Martha Bebinger WBUR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:43 pm

Two years ago, Dorothy Holmes, then 75, was in the cozy pink bathroom of her home getting ready to shower when she fell. It's the type of accident that's common among older Americans — and it's often the very thing that triggers the end of independence.

"I got a big spot on my head; it almost conked me out," Holmes says in her soft voice.

She heard her husband come down the hall, "and when he turned the corner all I heard was, 'Oh God, honey, what did you do now?' After that I don't know anything 'cause I passed out," Holmes recalls.

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Education
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

FAMU Marching Band Gets To Take Field Again After Hazing Death

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 9:18 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Members of the famed marching band at Florida A&M University learned today that they will once again be allowed to perform. It's been nearly two years since the band was last heard. The group was suspended following the hazing death of one of its drum majors. As Lynn Hatter of Florida Public Radio reports, the university says it will take work to prove times have changed.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ladies and gentlemen, the Florida A&M University marching band.

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Animals
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

After Losing His Raccoon, Man Takes His Appeal To Governor

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:43 pm

Mark "Coon Rippy" Brown, of Gallatin, Tenn., became an Internet sensation for posting videos online of himself bantering, dancing, even showering with his pet raccoons. He's now using his Internet fame to garner support, in an effort to get his pet raccoon Rebekah back from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, which recently seized the critter. It is illegal in Tennessee to possess native animals captured in the wild.

U.S.
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

States Target Hybrids As Gas Tax Revenues Ebb

Sara Busch of Havertown, Pa., owns a Chevy Volt, an electric hybrid. Like a lot of Americans, she's buying less gasoline than she used to, which means she's paying less in gas taxes.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:50 pm

Americans are buying less gasoline than they did just a few years back. While many people believe this is a good thing, it does present a problem: Most road construction is paid for with fuel taxes. Less gas tax revenue means less money for roads.

One reason gas purchases are down is that more people are driving more efficient cars, such as hybrid and electric vehicles. Now states are looking for solutions, including charging hybrids extra fees or imposing fees based on miles driven.

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Around the Nation
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Students Return To School In Moore, Okla., As City Rebuilds

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For students in Moore, Oklahoma it's not just new backpacks and pencils this year. For many, it's entirely new schools and homes. A tornado ripped through the community nearly three months ago. It destroyed two schools, killed seven students and 18 other people in the city. And tomorrow, students return to class.

Rachel Hubbard, of member station KOSU, checks in with Moore to see how the community is doing.

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Politics
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

GOP Divided Over Whether It Needs Better Outreach, Nominees

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:43 pm

The Republican National Committee meets this week in Boston with lots to argue about — if they choose to do so. There's immigration and Obamacare resistance and the 2016 presidential nominating system.

Law
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Pentagon Adds New Measures To Combat Sexual Assault

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:43 pm

Under pressure from Congress, the Pentagon has announced additional measures to combat sexual assault. The Pentagon continues to resist proposals that would take prosecution of sexual assault out of the chain of command, but some lawmakers say that's the step that would make a difference.

Economy
5:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Fears Of A Diminished Stimulus Send Stock Market Falling

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The stock market usually likes good news about the economy, but that's not always the case. This morning, stocks opened down sharply just after the government announced a surprisingly large drop in initial claims for unemployment benefits. In fact, claims fell to the lowest level since before the recession and the Dow Jones Industrials ended the day down 225 points, a decline of 1.5 percent.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Wishing And Hoping, Planning And Dreaming, Even In Extremis

The broken, parted: Rooney Mara and Casey Affleck are a couple separated by a robbery gone wrong in David Lowery's aching Ain't Them Bodies Saints.
Steve Dietl IFC

David Lowery's Ain't Them Bodies Saints begins with what might have been its end.

Ruth (Rooney Mara) and Bob (Casey Affleck) sit in their ramshackle home after a botched robbery. The small-town Texas cops shooting at them have already hit and killed Freddy, the twosome's partner, and Ruth has downed a policeman. They're outnumbered and trapped, and Ruth suggests they run; Bob knows that's suicide.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

To 'Austenland,' Where Jane Jokes Go To Die

Keri Russell's Jane Hayes daydreams of the Regency life, complete with suitors as handsome and rough-hewn as Bret McKenzie's Martin, in Austenland, a big-screen adaptation of the Shannon Hale novel.
Giles Keyte Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:45 pm

Austenland, a clunky broadside aimed at the cult of Jane Austen, is worth seeing primarily for its end credits, a mix of pop oil and water so joyfully dippy it might have produced a stifled giggle even in Herself.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Lives And History, Through The Eyes Of Big And Small

Forest Whitaker turns in a reserved performance as Cecil Gaines, butler to eight U.S. presidents, including Robin Williams' Dwight D. Eisenhower, in a Lee Daniels drama based on the true story of a White House veteran.
Anne Marie Fox The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 pm

In their approaches to history, Joshua Michael Stern's Jobs and Lee Daniels' The Butler could hardly be less similar. The former is an example of Victorian-style great-man biography, updated for the iThings era. The latter observes monumental events, mostly involving the civil rights movement, from an Everyman's perspective.

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The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On Its C-Max Hybrid

A Ford C-MAX hybrid vehicle goes through assembly at the Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, last November.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:05 am

(Updated 8:40 p.m. ET)

Ford on Thursday backpedaled on the stated fuel economy for its C-Max hybrid after customer complaints and an EPA investigation found that the vehicle wasn't living up to its advertised 47 mpg.

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This Is NPR
4:13 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

2014 Wall Calendar: April

Baltimore-based artist Julianna Brion's illustration designed for the 2014 NPR Wall Calendar.
Julianba Brion NPR

"Living in Baltimore, I walk everywhere I go. I love having access to information and entertainment right in my pocket. With NPR playing through my headphones, I feel connected to the rest of the world, learn new things and meet new people. Lonely walks become a time to cherish and look forward to, even on the dreariest days."

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
4:13 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Sean Jones, Jeff 'Tain' Watts On JazzSet

Sean Jones performs at the Detroit Jazz Festival.
Jeff Forman

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:32 am

Ohio-born trumpeter Sean Jones played lead for approximately five years with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis was a member of Sean's section. When was asked what he learned from Marsalis, Jones answered in two words: "work ethic."

Now 35-year-old Sean Jones is touring with the Marcus Miller group, an Associate Professor at Duquesne University and Oberlin Conservatory, Interim Artistic Director for the Cleveland Jazz Orchestra, and leading his group in Detroit with music from his album No Need for Words.

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From Scratch
4:05 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Mark Morris, Dancer And Choreographer

Host Jessica Harris speaks with American dancer and choreographer Mark Morris.

Harris also speaks with sculpting pioneer Andrew Goldsworthy.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
3:54 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Meet The Olinguito, The Newest Member Of The Raccoon Family

The olinguito is the first carnivore species to be discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.
Courtesy of Mark Gurney

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:44 pm

Scientists have just solved a case of mistaken identity. It involves a creature that looks like a cross between a house cat and a teddy bear, and it lives high up in the cloud forests of the Andes.

For over 100 years, scientists thought this animal was a well-known member of the raccoon family. Specifically, they thought it was a critter called the "olingo." But one scientist recently took another look and realized he had an entirely new species on his hands.

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The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Zoo In China Swaps Dog For Lion, Hopes No One Notices

Close enough? A Tibetan mastiff, like this one, was placed in the African lion exhibit at a zoo in China's central Henan province.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 3:07 pm

Visitors to a zoo in China got a rude surprise when the lion started barking.

Turns out it was no lion, but just a Tibetan mastiff, a large, hairy breed of dog — which, for what it's worth, more closely resembles the king of the jungle than does perhaps any other domestic canine.

Apparently, officials in Louhe city zoo in central Henan province hoped no one would notice when they decided to make the switch and send the enclosure's regular resident, an African lion, away to a breeding center.

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The Two-Way
2:21 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Obama Played Cards The Day Bin Laden Was Killed: Important?

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and other members of his national security team as they monitored the mission that ended with the death of Osama bin Laden in May 2011.
Pete Souza White House

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:06 am

Much is being made of something that former presidential "body man" Reggie Love said earlier this summer during a Q&A at UCLA. His words only came to light this week.

According to Love, on May 1, 2011, the day that Navy SEALs were closing in on Osama bin Laden:

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Shots - Health News
2:16 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Chronic Insomnia? Hitting The Treadmill Could Help ... Eventually

Can't sleep? Run down? Keep exercising.
CSA_Images iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 10:32 am

Studies on exercise and sleep come up with the same conclusion time after time: If you want to hit the hay earlier and sleep better, get a good cardio workout.

But if you're already sleep-deprived, don't expect a 30-minute run or stint on the elliptical to knock you out quicker tonight.

The sleep-boosting effects of exercise can take a few months to kick in for people who suffer insomnia, scientists report Thursday in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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