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The Two-Way
10:48 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Father And Son Coaxed From Jungle 40 Years After Vietnam War

Ho Van Lang, found in the jungle of central Vietnam 40 years after he and his father fled the war.
VTV2

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:55 pm

Four decades ago, Ho Van Thanh fled the fighting in his native Vietnam, disappearing into the jungle with his infant son, Ho Van Lang. This week, father and son emerged for the first time — an enfeebled Thanh carried in a stretcher, and Lang wearing only a loincloth made of tree bark.

According to the Vietnamese newspaper Dan Tri, Ho Van Thanh, now 82, was last seen in 1973 running into the jungle, after his wife and two other children were killed by a bomb or land mine near his home.

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Business
10:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

UBS To Pay $120 Million In Lehman Brothers Dispute

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more fallout from the financial crisis.

Swiss banking giant UBS has agreed to pay $120 million to settle a lawsuit by investors. The case goes back to 2007. Investors say they were misled about the health of the financial firm Lehmann Brothers when UBS was selling them investments linked to Lehmann's debt. Lehmann collapsed into bankruptcy in September 2008. The settlement resolves claims of about $1 billion. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Shots - Health News
10:19 am
Fri August 9, 2013

'Aetna, I'm Glad I Met Ya!' — On Twitter

Evidently, an old insurer can learn new tricks.
Bob Child AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:12 pm

A few weeks back, Sharon Roberts, who had been diagnosed with endometrial cancer last year, tweeted:

@teachdance11: the BRCA gene test is 2 parts. Aetna paid $300 part. Not the $7000 part. Gotta be rich to be in the know

The 55-year-old teacher in Houston was surprised when @aetnahelp, a Twitter account created for customer assistance by the insurance company Aetna, quickly responded.

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Moving On, And Up: Brian Banks, 27, Plays As NFL Rookie

Atlanta Falcons linebacker Brian Banks made his NFL debut in a preseason game Thursday night, more than 10 years after he was sent to prison for a crime of which he was later exonerated.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:23 am

"You're up next."

Those three words are what any athlete longs to hear. For linebacker Brian Banks, it took more than 10 years for that sentence to be addressed to him by an NFL coach. When he heard it in a preseason game Thursday night, Banks got a taste of the life he once dreamed of — before he became a convicted felon and lost his chance to go to college, and was finally exonerated.

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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Fri August 9, 2013

I Just Killed My Wife, Miami Man's Facebook Page Says

Derek Medina in a booking photo taken by the Miami-Dade Police Department.
handout Reuters /Landov

"I'm going to prison or death sentence for killing my wife. Love you guys. Miss you guys. Take care. Facebook people you'll see me in the news."

The Miami Herald and other news outlets are reporting that 31-year-old Derek Medina of South Miami apparently posted that Facebook message Thursday morning, along with a photo of a woman's "twisted, bloodied body lying on a linoleum floor."

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Can Hacking The Brain Make You Healthier?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:45 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About Andres Lozano's TEDTalk

Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano talks about dramatic findings in deep brain stimulation including a woman with Parkinson's who instantly stops shaking, and brain areas eroded by Alzheimer's that are brought back to life.

About Andres Lozano

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Can Anyone Become A Hacker?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:44 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About Jay Silver's TEDTalk

Why can't two slices of pizza be used as a slide clicker? Why shouldn't you make music with ketchup? Inventor Jay Silver talks about the urge to play with the world around you and demos MaKey MaKey, a kit for hacking everyday objects.

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Can Hacking The Stratosphere Solve Climate Change?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:43 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About David Keith's TEDTalk

Environmental scientist David Keith proposes a cheap and shocking way to address climate change: What if we inject a huge cloud of sulfur into the atmosphere to deflect sunlight and heat?

About David Keith

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Are We Ready To Hack The Animal Kingdom?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:46 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About Stewart Brand's TEDTalk

Mankind has driven species after species extinct. Now Stewart Brand says, we have the technology to bring back the species that we wiped out. So should we? Which ones? He asks a big question whose answer is closer than you may think.

About Stewart Brand

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Are There Good Hackers?

Mikko Hyppönen describes the guys who made the first PC virus — "these guys weren't evil at all."
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 10:10 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About Mikko Hyppönen's TEDTalk

In 1986, the first PC virus - Brain - began to spread. What was once annoying has become a sophisticated tool for crime. Computer security expert Mikko Hyppönen describes discovering Brain and why the guys who wrote it never meant any harm.

About Mikko Hyppönen

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

The Hackers

When typical solutions fall short, why not find a different way?
Thinkstock

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 10:08 am

A hacker is somebody who doesn't ask how something works — they just see what works. — Jay Silver

Science and technology now allow us to "hack" solutions to the biggest challenges of our time. But how far is too far? And what are the consequences of these hacks? In this hour, we hear stories from TED speakers who dare to hack the brain, the climate, and even the animal kingdom in hopes of creating a better world.

Shots - Health News
9:49 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Camels May Be A Source Of The Middle East Coronavirus

A dromedary camel waits for a tourist to hop on its back in Petra, Jordan. The country has recorded two cases of the Middle East respiratory syndrome.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:56 am

Looks like Arabian camels might be hiding more than just fat in those furry humps.

Scientists have found evidence that dromedary camels — the ones with just one hump — may be carriers of the lethal coronavirus in the Middle East, which has infected at least 94 people and killed 46 since first appearing in Saudi Arabia last year.

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Newport Folk Festival
9:32 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Jim James, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 3:39 pm

Jim James has spent his career singing big, booming songs that echo into the sky. With My Morning Jacket, he specializes in letting his gigantic voice ring out past the rafters in songs that boom and blare. But on his first solo album under his own name, this year's Regions of Light and Sound of God, James turns inward and recasts himself as a lost wanderer in search of redemption, salvation and comfort.

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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Verdict Today? Wait Continues At Trial Of 'Whitey' Bulger

A courtroom sketch of James "Whitey" Bulger (left) and defense attorney J.W. Carney, Jr.
Margaret Small AP

It's Day 4 of jury deliberations in the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger, the now-83-year-old Boston gangster who is accused of 19 murders and racketeering.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Fri August 9, 2013

West Coast Kidnap Suspect May Have Explosives, Police Warn

A sign for missing California teenager Hannah Anderson hangs on a fence at El Capitan High School in the Lakeside neighborhood of San Diego County.
Sam Hodgson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 2:50 pm

Update At 2:40 p.m. ET: Sheriff: Car Recovered

San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said Friday that the car belonging to the suspect has been found near Cascade, Idaho. He said the license plate had been removed, but the Vehicle Identification Number, or VIN, showed a match as belonging to James Lee DiMaggio.

Gore said that horseback riders in the mountains northeast of Boise believe they saw DiMaggio, who is suspected of killing Christina Anderson and abducted at least one of her children.

Here's our earlier post:

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All Tech Considered
8:52 am
Fri August 9, 2013

The Sheryl Sandberg Effect: Rise Of Female COOs

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, in 2008.
Dan Farber via Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:34 pm

As part of our reboot of All Tech Considered, we've been inviting contributors to blog about big-picture questions facing tech and society. One theme we're exploring is the lack of women and people of color in tech — a gap so glaring that ridiculously long lines at tech conferences have inspired photo essays and Twitter feeds.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:48 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Beach Beasts On The Move

The Strandbeest pays a visit to Melbourne, Australia, in 2012.
Scott Barbour Getty Images

Theo Jansen, the artist, writes on his website that he is occupied with creating new forms of life:

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Shots - Health News
8:41 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Swallowing Tiny Magnets Can Lead To Big Trouble For Kids

There's only one way to know if magnets and kids attract: with an x-ray.
Julie Brown/Seattle Children"s Hospital

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:56 am

About five years ago, emergency room doctor Julie Brown met an 8-year-old girl who complained about a weeklong stomach ache. The girl was tight-lipped about what might be causing the pain, and she ended up visiting the Seattle Children's Hospital, where Brown works, twice. And then a third time.

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The Two-Way
7:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Powerball Jackpot Winners Include 16 N.J. County Workers

Paul White of Ham Lake, Minn., and his partner Kim VanReese. White bought one of the three winning tickets in Wednesday's $448.4 million Powerball lottery. While one-third of the jackpot is about $149.4 million, he's chosen to take his share in a lump sum rather than spread out over many years. That lump sum is $86 million, which after taxes will be about $58 million.
Eric Miller Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 9:03 am

One of the three tickets that ended up being winners of Wednesday's $448.4 million Powerball jackpot belongs to a group of 16 workers at the Ocean County Vehicle Maintenance Department in New Jersey, according to local news outlets.

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