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Movie Reviews
4:59 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

'At Any Price': What Cost A Win?

They might look like team players, but Dean (Zac Efron) and his ambitious father (Dennis Quaid) have markedly different goals for the future of their expanding family farm — and the people who run it.
Hooman Bahrani Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 5:29 pm

Like last year's fracking drama Promised Land, the new movie At Any Price is about farm people getting pushed around by corporations — except that there's no Matt Damon to rescue them, cleanse his soul and snag Rosemarie DeWitt in the bargain.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Bill Gates' Handshake With South Korea's Park Sparks Debate

This handshake between South Korean President Park Geun-hye and Microsoft founder Bill Gates sparked debate over whether the American — who kept his left hand in his pocket — had been rude. Other photos clearly show Gates' hand in his pocket.0
Lee Jin-man AP

Microsoft founder Bill Gates met with South Korean President Park Geun-hye Monday, part of a visit to build business ties and boost nuclear energy plans. But it was the handshake they shared that created the biggest stir in Korean society, after Gates greeted Park with a smile — and his left hand jammed into his pants pocket.

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The Salt
4:32 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

When Cheeseburger = Walking, Will We Eat Less?

Would you like that burger with a side of exercise?
iStockphoto.com

Nutrition labeling has been required on packaged food since 1990, and the new federal food safety law will require calorie counts to be posted for restaurant food — all in an effort to get the American public to eat healthier.

But most studies on calorie count labels show they don't do much to nudge people toward better food choices. If I want that oh-so-delicious Chunky Monkey ice cream, knowing that a half-cup serving delivers 300 calories and 18 grams of fat isn't going to stop me.

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Business
4:31 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Online Retailers Take Opposite Sides On Sales Tax Bill

Humberto Manzano Jr. moves a pallet of goods at an Amazon.com fulfillment center in Phoenix in 2010. Amazon has endorsed a bill making its way through the Senate that would require more online retailers to collect sales tax.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

More online retailers would have to collect sales tax under a bill making its way through the U.S. Senate this week. The measure won strong bipartisan backing on a procedural vote Monday, and President Obama has said he would sign it.

The political battle over the bill pits online retailers against brick-and-mortar stores — and, in some cases, against other online sellers.

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Strange News
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Help Wanted: Must Like Big Stones, Work Well With Druids

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, from the Help Wanted desk here at ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Manager wanted at Stonehenge: Must like big stones and work well with Druids.

CORNISH: OK, that's not the exact wording they used, but English Heritage - which runs Stonehenge and the other U.K. historic sites - is in fact looking for a general manager for the ancient site.

SIEGEL: They're also looking for a part-time solstice manager.

CORNISH: Right. The full-time gig pays almost pays almost $100,000 a year.

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Latin America
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Venezuela Deeply Divided After Chavez Death, Recent Election

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The death of Hugo Chavez, Venezuela's bombastic and charismatic president, has left that country sharply divided. His handpicked successor, Nicolas Maduro, took over. He won a snap election, which gave the ruling party six more years. But Maduro's victory was slim. Nearly half the country supported his opponent, and that creates instability in one of the world's great oil powers. NPR's Juan Forero reports from Caracas on the uncertainty about Venezuela's future.

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National Security
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Canada Case Raises Concern About Link Between Al-Qaida, Iran

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A different terror plot was foiled yesterday in Canada. That's according to the Canadian government. Two men are in custody. They're accused of planning to derail a passenger train with explosives. Canadian authorities say the plot was supported by al-Qaida operatives in Iran. Iran denies that.

Is it credible; is there any formal relationship between Al-Qaida and Iran? It's a question that's been explored at least as far back as the 9/11 Commission.

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World
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Relatives Of Bombing Suspects Shocked By Attacks

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to Dagestan in southern Russia. It's home to family members of the two Boston bombing suspects, including their parents, and they have been under siege by reporters in Dagestan. Today, the family cancelled a planned news conference, and it's now facing questions from the Russian security services. NPR's Corey Flintoff joins us from Dagestan. And, Corey, first of all, remind us why the parents are there and not in the U.S.

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Latin America
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Bolivia Tries To Regain Sea Access It Lost To Chile In 1904

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Bolivia wants access to the Pacific Ocean, so it's taking Chile to court. The landlocked South American nation lost its coastline in a war back in the late 1800s. Now, Bolivia's foreign minister has arrived at The Hague where he and a delegation will present their case at the International Court of Justice. NPR's South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

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The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Allan Arbus, Who Played Psychiatrist On TV's 'M.A.S.H.,' Dies At 95

Allan Arbus on the left, with fellow M.A.S.H. stars Loretta Swit, Mike Farrell, Burt Metcalfe, Alan Alda, Kellye Nakahara Wallet and Wayne Rogers at an awards ceremony in 2009.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Allan Arbus, best known for his recurring role as psychiatrist Sidney Freedman on the hit television comedy M.A.S.H., has died at age 95, his family says.

Arbus died Friday due to congestive heart failure, his daughter said in a statement. His second wife, Mariclare Costello Arbus, told Reuters that her husband "just got weaker and weaker and was at home with his daughter and me" when he passed away.

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Law
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Napolitano: Immigration Bill Would Enhance National Security

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

This hour begins with perspectives on the Boston bombings from the U.S. and from the Dagestan region of Russia, where the suspects' parents live. First, to Capitol Hill.

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Law
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Sticking Points Throw Wrench In Immigration Reform Bill

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Congress, lawmakers are in the thick of trying to figure out new immigration legislation, and as we've been reporting, the Boston bombings have thrown a wrench into that process since it appears the attacks were carried out by legal immigrants. More on that elsewhere in today's program. We wanted to break down the other major sticking points, since there are a lot of them.

And here to help is Fawn Johnson, who covers immigration for The National Journal. Welcome to the studio.

FAWN JOHNSON: Pleased to be here.

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Politics
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Mont. Senator Baucus To Retire After 36 Years In Congress

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And one other piece of news from the Senate, Democrat Max Baucus is retiring. The powerful chair of the Senate Finance Committee has represented Montana since 1978. Baucus is the sixth Senate Democrat to announce he won't run for reelection in 2014. NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith has that story.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:11 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Noticing: How To Take A Walk In The Woods

Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:41 pm

When was the last time you met someone who didn't tell you they were "crazy busy"? It seems like everyone these days is overwhelmed. From the endless tasks of maintaining home and family life to the ever-accelerating pressures of the endlessly troubled, endlessly competitive economy, it seems that all of us are running ragged.

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Piano Jazz With Jon Weber
4:07 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Allan Harris On Piano Jazz

Allan Harris.
Ayano Hisa Courtesy of the artist

On this episode of Piano Jazz With Jon Weber, velvet-voiced singer, guitarist and composer Allan Harris joins Weber for a set of standards and a few tunes from the Harris-penned musical, Cross That River.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
4:04 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Routine On U.S. Racetracks, Horse Doping Is Banned In Europe

French jockey Olivier Peslier celebrates a win at Longchamps racecourse near Paris in 2012. While many drugs can legally be used on horses in U.S. racing, they are barred in Europe.
Fred Dufour AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:30 pm

At the famous Hippodrome de Longchamp just outside of Paris this month, crowds came to cheer and bet on the sleek thoroughbreds that opened horse racing season by galloping down the verdant turf course.

Horse racing in Europe is different from the sport in the U.S., from the shape and surface of the track to race distances and the season itself. Another big difference is doping.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
3:31 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Boston Search Shines Spotlight On Surveillance Cameras

An investigator inspects the area near a surveillance camera on the roof of the Lord & Taylor store near the Boston Marathon finish line on Thursday. That camera provided the first glimpse of the men who allegedly planted the bombs.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Footage from surveillance cameras along the Boston Marathon route gave the FBI early clues about the bombing suspects. And prosecutors say they'll use some of those images to try to prove their criminal case against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. But the proliferation of cameras in America's big cities is raising some tricky questions about the balance between security and privacy.

It was pictures of two brothers taken by a camera outside the Lord & Taylor department store that provided the first glimpse of the men who allegedly bombed the Boston Marathon.

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World Cafe
3:31 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

The Milk Carton Kids, Making The Most Of Two Voices

The Milk Carton Kids.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:36 pm

When Kenneth Pattengale and Joey Ryan ditched their solo careers to form The Milk Carton Kids, they discovered that they had a lot to teach each other. They also had a plan: to give their music away in order to find their audience. It worked remarkably well. Now, their third album, The Ash & Clay, is out on a regular label — no freebies this time around — and they're playing to packed houses across the U.S. and Europe.

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Mountain Stage
2:52 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Corb Lund On Mountain Stage

Corb Lund performs live on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Corb Lund makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va. Lund was born into a family of Canadian cattle ranchers and spent most of his youth in Alberta's southern foothills. Perhaps as a result, his particular blend of country mixes the best of cowboy music, Western swing and rockabilly with a steely edge.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Breaking Tradition, Cooper Union Will Charge Undergrads Tuition

The new Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art academic building is seen in Manhattan's Cooper Square in New York City.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Citing financial strain, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art announced that beginning in the fall of 2014, it would begin charging its undergraduate students tuition.

The college is one of the few institutions that doesn't charge students tuition.

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