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6:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Gangs Scrutinized After Colo. Correction Chief's Murder

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Investigators have identified a suspect in the murder of the state prison's director. The suspect is member of a whites-only prison gang. Now, the probe is not over but it is raising new questions about extremist organizations inside the prison system.

Here's Colorado Public Radio's Megan Verlee.

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Business
6:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now solar power has had its problems in recent decades. For years, solar panels were too expensive to compete. More recently, as we heard earlier in the business news, solar panels got so cheap that manufacturers ran into trouble. But solar energy had a signal achievement in March, and that is our last word in business today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Music News
6:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Rap Genius Annotates Song Verses

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, lets meet a couple of guys who are big fans of Ghostface Killah.

MAHBOD MOGHADAM: The best Ghostface song, I think, is " Nutmeg." That's all of his...

GREENE: That's Mahbod Moghadam. He and his friend Tom Lehman co-founded a Web site called Rap Genius.

MOGHADAM: Tom is here looking up...

TOM LEHMAN: These are my favorite lines of Ghost. It's from "Buck 50," where he says: supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, docialiexpilisticfragicalsuper Wu-Tang Chamber. Cancun catch me in the a room eating grouper...

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NPR Story
5:03 am
Mon April 22, 2013

She Works: Advice To Your Younger Self?

The earliest photo of Susan Stamberg at a microphone, age 25. Later, as the host of All Things Considered, she became the first woman to be a full-time anchor of a national nightly news broadcast in the U.S.
Courtesy of Susan Stamberg

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 8:41 pm

Over the next few weeks we'll be asking NPR women about their careers — and inviting you to join the conversation. The first question goes to Susan Stamberg, one of NPR's "founding mothers."

Question: What kind of advice would you give your younger self?

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Shots - Health News
3:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Scammers Find Fertile Ground In Health Law

Confusion over the details of the new health care law is leaving many people vulnerable to con artists. Evelyne Lois Such, 86, was recently the target of an attempted scam.
Matt Nager for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

One recent morning, Evelyne Lois Such was sitting at her kitchen table in Denver when the phone rang. Such, who's 86, didn't recognize the phone number or the deep voice on the other end of the line.

"He asked, 'Are you a senior?' and I said yes, and he said, 'Well, we are sending out all new Medicare cards, and I want to make sure I have all your statistics just correct,' " Such recalls.

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Shots - Health News
3:26 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Young Adults With Autism Can Thrive In High-Tech Jobs

Amelia Schabel, 23, works with art director Andrew LaBounty at the nonPareil Institute in Plano, Texas.
Courtesy of nonPareil

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:07 pm

The job hunt is complicated enough for most high school and college graduates — and even tougher for the growing number of young people on the autism spectrum. Despite the obstacles that people with autism face trying to find work, there's a natural landing place: the tech industry.

Amelia Schabel graduated from high school five years ago. She had good grades and enrolled in community college. But it was too stressful. After less than a month she was back at home, doing nothing.

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Business
3:24 am
Mon April 22, 2013

This Building Is Supergreen. Will It Be Copied?

This Seattle building, a project by the Bullitt Foundation, is said to be the world's greenest office building. It uses a weather station to conserve energy, creates lighting via photovoltaic cells on the roof and features composting toilets.
Courtesy of John Stamets

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 10:18 am

One of the world's greenest office buildings formally open its doors Monday — Earth Day. It's a project of the environmentally progressive Bullitt Foundation. Its ambition is bold: to showcase an entirely self-sustaining office building hoping that others will create similar projects.

The first thing that strikes you about the new Bullitt Center is the windows. Walking up to the building in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood, six stories of floor-to-ceiling glass soars above you.

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The Record
3:23 am
Mon April 22, 2013

The Ghostface Killah Rises Again

Adrian Younge (left) and Ghostface onstage at the Seattle stop of their tour last week.
Erich Donaldson

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:26 pm

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The Salt
3:22 am
Mon April 22, 2013

How Coffee Brings The World Together

The best coffee comes from high altitudes with a warm climate like in Huehuetenango, Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:51 pm

Coffee is more than a drink. For many of us — OK, for me — it's woven into the fabric of every day.

It also connects us to far corners of the globe.

For instance, every Friday, a truck pulls up to the warehouse of Counter Culture Coffee, a small roaster and coffee distributor in Durham, N.C., and unloads a bunch of heavy burlap sacks.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
3:20 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Want More Gender Equality At Work? Go To An Emerging Market

Petrobras state-owned oil company CEO Maria das Gracas Silva Foster makes a speech during the Women's Forum Brazil 2012 in Sao Paulo, Brazil last year.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:11 am

A White House report puts it bluntly: "Today, younger women are more likely to graduate from college than are men and are more likely to hold a graduate school degree."

For the past decade more American women than men have earned undergraduate and Master's degrees; and in the past three years, they've outpaced men at the doctoral level, too.

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The Salt
2:03 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Coffee Quiz: Discover The World In A Cup Of Joe

David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:51 pm

Coffee is woven into the fabric of our lives. It's a morning ritual, social stimulant, a solitary pleasure, an intellectual catalyst. All this week, along with our friends at Morning Edition, we're bringing you the stories behind the coffee in your cup – from the farms of Guatemala to the corner coffee shop. And we're exploring how coffee changes people's lives.

Are you someone who runs on coffee? Test your knowledge of this vital brew:

Author Interviews
6:23 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

'Humanity' May Get Second Chance In Jean Thompson's New Novel

chuwy iStockphoto.com

In Jean Thompson's latest novel, The Humanity Project, humanity isn't doing so well and could use some help. Sean is a wayward carpenter whose bad luck with women turns into even worse luck: He's addicted to painkillers, and he and his teenage son Conner are facing eviction. Linnea is the teen survivor of a school shooting who travels west to California to live with a father she barely knows. Mrs. Foster is a wealthy woman who's taken to living with feral cats, and whose "Humanity Project" just might take a chance on people who thought they were out of luck.

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World
6:03 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Rare Churchill Poem Fails To Sell At Auction

A portrait of Winston Churchill in 1900, around the time he wrote "Our Modern Watchwords."
J.E. Purdy Library of Congress

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:23 pm

Around the turn of the 19th century, before he became Britain's revered prime minister, a young Winston Churchill found himself in South Africa. He was serving in the Army and as a war correspondent covering the Boer War.

One day, he put a blue pencil to army-issued notepaper and conveyed his thoughts about the conflict in a 40-line poem. More than a century later, "Our Modern Watchwords" was discovered by a retired manuscript dealer.

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All Tech Considered
5:18 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Philly Turns Skyscraper Into Video Game Screen For Tech Week

The Cira Centre, right, was illuminated Friday night with LED lights, transforming it into a giant screen to play the video game Pong.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:23 pm

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The Two-Way
5:07 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Antares Rocket Launch Is A Success, In Test Of Orbital Supply Vehicle

The Antares rocket lifts off from the launchpad at the NASA facility on Wallops Island Va., Sunday, beginning a test mission that has now been deemed a success. The Orbital Sciences Corp. rocket will eventually deliver supplies to the International Space Station.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:04 pm

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

How Media Can Avoid Tripping Over Fast-Paced Developments

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:23 pm

Host Jacki Lyden speaks with Craig Silverman of the Poynter Institute about the problematic media coverage of the Boston bombings and other breaking news events. He discusses how journalists can avoid the all-too-common pitfalls when reporting on a developing story.

NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

So Many Trivia Questions And So Much Time In Wis. Contest

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:23 pm

The world's biggest trivia contest kicked off Friday night in Stevens Point, Wis. Its proportions are epic: For 54 hours straight, thousands of contestants worldwide call the radio station with answers to some 500 questions. Host Jacki Lyden gets the scoop from trivia host Jim "Oz" Oliva, who has run the contest for decades.

NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Sunday Gatherings Bring Bostonians Some Solace

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:23 pm

Boston is slowly regaining its sense of normalcy. Even though many questions about last week's events remain unanswered, Bostonians found solace in religious and memorial services. NPR's Dan Bobkoff reports that the somber mood was the backdrop Sunday as everyone waited to see what will happen next in the case.

NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Danger In Conflation: Separating Islam From Acts Of Terror

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:23 pm

Host Jacki Lyden talks to Omid Safi, professor of religious studies at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Safi has blogged about the Tsarnaev brothers, the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings, and what it means to the American Islamic community that the brothers are Muslim.

Music
5:00 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

A Folk Singer Sets Sail, With The Bard At The Bow

Amy Speace's latest album is called How to Sleep in a Stormy Boat.
Gina Binkley Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 6:23 pm

Before Amy Speace embarked on a career in music, the stage called her name. That's a good fact to keep in mind when listening to the actor-turned-folk singer's latest album, How to Sleep in a Stormy Boat.

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