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The Two-Way
7:12 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Weiner's Own Words: Saying One Thing, Doing Another?

Anthony Weiner during an appearance Tuesday in which he admitted that he had continued to "sext" after resigning from Congress in 2011.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 9:25 am

  • The statement Anthony Weiner made when he resigned from Congress on June 16, 2011.

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The Two-Way
7:06 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Book News: Chuck Palahniuk Working On 'Fight Club' Sequel

Chuck Palahniuk rides the Paris subway on Sept. 29, 2006.
Christophe Ena AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Economy
7:06 am
Wed July 24, 2013

As Obama Renews Jobs Push, How Is The Economy Doing?

Workers line up pipe while drilling for oil outside Watford City, N.D. While the energy sector has been strong, millions of Americans have been out of work since the recession ended.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 10:35 am

The U.S. economy has been growing for four straight years — each under the leadership of President Obama.

But the pace of improvement has been disappointing to many, especially the nearly 12 million people still looking for work.

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Around the Nation
6:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Nine Months After Sandy, New Jersey's Seeing A Baby Boom

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

World
6:17 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Biden Escapes Monkey Business On Trip To India

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Security for Joe Biden's trip to India is tight, but agents couldn't do much about some rowdy troublemakers during a stop at the Gandhi Memorial. About a dozen monkeys took over a tree above a statue where the vice president would be posing. The Wall Street Journal says they swung on branches and threw half-eaten mangoes to the ground. Photographers held their breath as Biden and his wife approached - luckily, no falling mangoes or other monkey business.

NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Manning Trial Heads Into Closing Arguments

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Closing arguments in the Bradley Manning trial are scheduled for tomorrow. The Army private first class admitted to perpetrating the largest leak of classified data in U.S. history. That's when he sent secret government documents to Wikileaks in 2010. The U.S. government has charged Manning with 22 offenses. The most serious is aiding the enemy, and he could face life in prison if he's convicted.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Tucson Revives Mexican-American Studies Program

The Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) is resurrecting its Mexican-American studies program.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Three years after it was banned by the state of Arizona, the Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) is resurrecting its Mexican-American studies program due to a federal court order. The courses are now known as culturally-relevant classes and are set to begin in a couple of weeks, when the school year begins. And they hold the same potential for controversy.

The TUSD board's decision to bring back the ethnic studies program was a whole lot less contentious than its decision to end the Mexican-American studies classes three years ago.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

House To Vote On Defunding NSA Phone Surveillance

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The U.S. House of Representatives is taking up the issue of domestic spying. Lawmakers are expected to vote today on an amendment that would reign in the National Security Agency program that collects the phone records of millions of Americans. This would be the first vote on the matter since the scope of the NSA program was made public in a series of leaks. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports, at issue is an amendment to the defense appropriations bill.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Top General: U.S. Options In Syria Have Big Downsides

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Again, that ever more bitter divide between Iraq's Sunnis and Shiites is a spillover from the vicious war in neighboring Syria. Under pressure from Congress, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff has prepared five military options for Syria, but it's not clear the nation's top general thinks highly of any of them.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Iraq's Sectarian Divide Deepens Amid Syrian Conflict

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The conflict in Syria is becoming more sectarian by the day, and this is having an effect in the region.

In Iraq there has been a spike in violence, much of it sparked by the war next door in Syria, where a largely Sunni rebellion is fighting against the government that's aligned with Shiite militias.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Residents Of Blue Spanish Village Say It's Just Smurfy

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is blue is the new black.

The Spanish village of Juzcar - like many places in Spain - was suffering from economic hard times. But then a stroke - or a paint stroke - of good luck.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In 2011, Sony Pictures picked the little town of about 250 people to promote "The Smurfs 3D." Promoters painted the entire village, everything - from the church to the town hall - bright blue, just like those little cartoon creatures.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Congress Weighs Whether Big Banks Can Own Commercial Assets

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Congress is talking again about whether big banks are taking on too much risk. This time, the question is whether banks should be allowed to own commercial assets, including everything from oil and metals to warehouses and parking garages.

As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, the question is whether holding a vast array of assets makes banks safer and more stable, or prone to more market risk.

YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: The Senate Banking Committee's Sherrod Brown, an Ohio Democrat, framed the issue this way...

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Apple's iPhone Sales Up, But Profits Down

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Apple sold more iPhones than expected last quarter, though its profits are down compared to last year. Still, in a quarter were other tech companies aren't meeting expectations, some analyst's say Apple isn't doing too badly.

NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: Apple's revenue was pretty much flat, at a little over 35 billion, and its profits were down nearly two billion. Despite a rise in iPhone sales, Samsung is still selling more smartphones.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Daimler Profits Rev Up In Second Quarter

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with fancy cars revving up.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Can Detroit Be Saved?

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's bankruptcy that's shaken up the city of Detroit and exposed how a once-great American city can collapse.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The city of Detroit's population went from a peak of 1.8 million people in the 1950s to less than half of that today. Detroit shed jobs as the auto industry changed worldwide, leaving large swaths of desolation throughout the city.

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All Tech Considered
3:23 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Online Marketers Take Note Of Brains Wired For Rewards

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Ask yourself: Are you addicted to technology — any technology? Do you check email obsessively, tweet without restraint or post on Facebook during Thanksgiving dinner? Or perhaps you are powerless in the face of an iPad loaded with Angry Birds?

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Sports
3:06 am
Wed July 24, 2013

'Beep Baseball' A Homerun With Blind Players

Ryan Strickland takes a practice swing. Even though most players are legally blind, batters, basemen and outfielders all wear blindfolds in Beep Baseball so that people who can see shadows, for example, don't have an advantage.
Jessica Robinson for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

The air smells like cut grass and barbecue at Friendship Park in north Spokane, Wash. And Bee Yang is up to bat. The outfielders get ready. Yang is known as a power hitter.

But this is not your usual baseball game. There's a twist: most of the athletes on the field are visually impaired. Players know where the ball is by listening for it. It's called Beep Baseball, named for the beeping sound the balls make.

Yang listens for the pitch.

He swings.

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Music News
3:05 am
Wed July 24, 2013

In Hollywood, The Actor Who Gives The Call To Prayer

"The bottom line is my Muslim friends have no idea what it's like to be an actor, and my actor friends have no idea what is it like to be a Muslim," Ben Youcef says.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 10:05 am

For the next year, NPR will take a musical journey across America, which is one of the most religiously diverse countries on earth. We want to discover and celebrate the many ways in which people make spiritual music — individually and collectively, inside and outside houses of worship.

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Code Switch
3:04 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Being In The Minority Can Cost You And Your Company

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

The racial wage gap in the United States — the gap in salary between whites and blacks with similar levels of education and experience — is shaped by geography, according to new social science research.

The larger the city, the larger the racial wage gap, according to researchers Elizabeth Ananat, Shihe Fu and Stephen L. Ross, whose findings were recently published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

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Code Switch
12:53 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Univision Clips 'Tweety's' Wings

Univision has canceled a popular Spanish-language radio show hosted by Eddie Sotelo, also known as Piolín or "Tweety Bird."
Damian Dovarganes AP

If you drive anywhere in greater Los Angeles, you know that you spend a significant amount of time staring at the bumper of the car ahead of you. And you may have noticed that a lot of those bumpers have red and yellow stickers that say "PIOLÍN por la MAÑANA." A lot.

The stickers show up on everything from sleek luxury cars to beat-up pickup trucks, and they advertise the morning drive-time radio show of Eddie "Piolín" Sotelo. (Piolín translates into "Tweety Bird" in Spanish—a gleeful moniker for the cheerful, diminutive host.)

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