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Shots - Health News
3:29 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

A Bit Of Thought Makes Finding Out Medical Risks Less Scary

Angelina Jolie took a genetic test to find out her risk of breast cancer, and had a preventive double mastectomy.
Alastair Grant PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:39 pm

Would you want to know your risk of getting heart disease? Diabetes? Or an inherited form of breast cancer?

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The Two-Way
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Ireland Enacts Law Providing For Abortion, A First

Ireland now has its first law making abortion legal in the country under specific conditions, after President Michael D. Higgins signed the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Bill 2013 into law Tuesday.

The legislation provides women with access to abortion in cases where their lives are at risk, including medical emergencies and cases in which suicide could be a factor.

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Krulwich Wonders...
1:28 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Mysterious Dancing Lights In Afghanistan

Courtesy of Michael Yon

This isn't a painting. It's not from a movie. It's not a strange astronomical event. This is real — what you can see when certain helicopters in Afghanistan touch down on sandy ground, raising dust, causing mysterious arcs of light to loop and dance through the air.

This doesn't always happen. "The halos usually disappear as the rotors change pitch," wrote war photographer Michael Yon. "On some nights, on this very same landing zone, no halos form." How come?

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The Record
1:12 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Maxwell's, The Beloved New Jersey Venue, Closes

Maxwell's, in Hoboken, N.J., hosted Bruce Springsteen, Nirvana and the Replacements, to name a few.
George Kopp

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

The rock club Maxwell's is a tiny space that's hosted some of the biggest names in music for more than 30 years. R.E.M., Nirvana and many more bands have squeezed onto Maxwell's stage in Hoboken, N.J. Native son Bruce Springsteen recorded the music video for "Glory Days" there.

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All Tech Considered
1:12 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Report: MIT Didn't Target Swartz; Missed 'Wider Background'

Internet activist Aaron Swartz at a rally in January 2012.
Daniel J. Sieradski Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 2:42 pm

In a long-awaited chronicle of its involvement in the prosecution of the late Internet activist Aaron Swartz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology officials released a 180-page report saying administrators never "targeted" the programmer and committed no wrongdoing. But the report raises questions about existing university policies and whether MIT should have stepped in to actively support Swartz, rather than take its "position of neutrality."

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Deceptive Cadence
1:07 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Creating American Symphonies To Tell 'Distinctly American' Stories

New York-based composer Mohammed Fairouz.
Samantha West Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 8:48 am

To say that you're writing a symphony today is a statement, especially for a young composer like me. The challenge is to find just the right way to commandeer the age-old form, to render it fresh and vital once again within an American context.

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Book Reviews
1:06 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

With 'Arrangements' And 'The Rest,' Two Debut Novelists Arrive

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:41 pm

The novel I've been recommending this summer to anyone, female or male, who's looking for the trifecta — a good story that's beautifully written and both hilarious and humane — is Seating Arrangements, Maggie Shipstead's debut novel from last summer. I was about to go all old-school and excitedly add that Seating Arrangements is now out in paperback, except since more and more readers are instantly downloading new books at a discount, paperbacks are becoming increasingly irrelevant.

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The Picture Show
12:58 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Folkstagrams From Newport's Folk Festival

Father John Misty
@tinydesk/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:04 pm

Our music team returned home from the Newport Folk Festival this week, an experience they likened to being at summer camp; "crowded, loud, fun, full of a lot of your favorite people — and you never want to leave."

They might be a little tired, possibly a bit sore and missing their new friends; but these sweet Instagrams make us think it was all worth it. Sleep it off, guys, until next year.

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Investigators: Train Conductor Was On Phone During Spain Crash

Flowers pay tribute to the victims of the train that crashed in northwestern Spain last week. The driver of the train was on the phone and traveling at nearly twice the speed limit, according to court papers.
Rafa Rivas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:18 pm

The driver of a Spanish train that derailed and killed 79 people was speaking on the phone and had taken the train to nearly twice the speed allowed on the stretch of track where the crash occurred, according to court investigators who reviewed the train's "black box" recorders.

After reaching speeds of 119 miles per hour, train conductor Francisco Jose Garzon Amo tried to slow the train down "seconds before the crash," according to an Associated Press report on the court's preliminary findings, which were released Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Bradley Manning Not Guilty Of 'Aiding The Enemy'

Army Private Bradley Manning, center, leaves the courtroom at Fort Meade, Maryland, on Tuesday.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:47 pm

This post was last updated at 6:42 p.m. ET.

Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst who perpetrated the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, has been acquitted of the most serious charge against him.

Col. Denise Lind, the military judge presiding over the case in Fort Meade, Md., found the Army private not guilty of aiding the enemy, when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to WikiLeaks. The charge carried a possible punishment of life in prison.

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Planet Money
12:49 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

NYT Excerpt: Radical Accounting And The Value Of Ideas

Seattle Municipal Archives

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:34 pm

In his New York Times Magazine column this week, Adam Davidson writes about the challenges of measuring productivity in today's economy. Here's an excerpt.

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Music Reviews
12:48 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

'The Edenfred Files': Darryl Harper's Blues-Infused Jazz

Clarinetist Darryl Harper discovered jazz as a teenager in Philadelphia.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:41 pm

In jazz, the clarinet went into eclipse for awhile, drowned out by louder trumpets and saxes. The instrument has long since made a comeback, and the modern clarinet thrives in settings where it doesn't have to shout to be heard.

Take "Spindleshanks," a little out-of-sync boogie-woogie for Darryl Harper's clarinet and Kevin Harris' piano. It's from Harper's The Edenfred Files. In his long-running Onus Trio, the spare unit Darryl Harper features on most of his new album, he can sing softly as an owl in the night.

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The Salt
12:45 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Is The Way To Tech Workers' Loyalty Through Their Stomachs?

Ari Dvorin was hired in May as the first corporate chef at SpareFoot, a startup in Austin, Texas. Here, Dvorin cuts suckling pig for a mockumentary SpareFoot made.
Jenny Zhang Courtesy of SpareFoot

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 3:01 pm

The dazzling array of food options at the Googleplex campus in Mountain View, Calif. — 25 cafes at last count — is the much-cited example of tech world food perks. And you can peruse the menus at Airbnb and Facebook to get a taste of an equally high bar for not just free food, but worldly food that is designed to delight and fuel employees to work better and harder.

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Africa
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

After 3 Decades Of Mugabe, Could Zimbabwe Get A New Leader?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, Detroit's bankruptcy last week made headlines because it was the biggest in history, but now comes the question of why this happened and what, if anything, this means for other American cities. We'll hear two very different views about this in just a few minutes. But first, we want to turn to two significant elections in Africa this week. The West African country of Mali is being praised for a smooth presidential vote this past weekend.

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Music
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

'Life Goes On' For Author Benjamin Alire Saenz

Author Benjamin Alire Saenz's teen-lit novel Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe won big at this year's American Library Association awards. For Tell Me More's 'In Your Ear' series, he shares the songs that inspire him.

Around the Nation
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Widows: Getting Your Kids On Board With The Dating Game

Dating after losing a spouse can come with a world of complications. And if you're a parent, it can be especially hard to explain new relationships to children. Two moms who lost their husbands share how they ventured back into dating and how their children reacted.

U.S.
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Cities On The Brink: Lessons From Detroit

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We turn now to the debate about Detroit. It's been almost two weeks since Detroit became the largest municipality to file for bankruptcy in this country, but the debate on why it happened and what lessons, if any, other cities in the country can learn from it are still going on.

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Law
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

What's Behind Falling Incarceration Rates?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we'll talk about elections set for Zimbabwe, where 89-year-old President Robert Mugabe is hoping to win yet another term despite - or maybe because of - what many people call an increasingly abusive dictatorial style of government. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes. But first, we want to talk about an issue that's become a central focus of activists in this country - it's the incarceration rate.

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Newport Folk Festival
11:25 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Andrew Bird, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 3:50 pm

Andrew Bird's records have grown quieter and more intimate in recent years, but he remains a remarkably dynamic live performer: Last year's Break It Yourself wouldn't seem to be the stuff of blockbuster live shows, and yet when he took it to the stage, he injected its characteristically smart, brooding songs with surprising intensity. Of course, it helps that, 12 albums into an unpredictable career, Bird has become a cult superstar whose fans clearly fuel him onstage.

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All Tech Considered
11:24 am
Tue July 30, 2013

In The Digital Age, The Family Photo Album Fades Away

In the future, a hard drive full of photographs may serve as the digital analog of a pile of old pictures.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 2:42 pm

Once upon a time, parents documented their kids' firsts in words and pictures in baby books and scrapbooks that got updated as life's big milestones got reached. Family photo albums grew thick with memories of trips, holidays, friends and relatives.

But who has time for that? I have two kids, thousands of pictures of them and a bunch of well-meaning, half-finished photo book projects littering my house and computer.

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