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6:15 am
Wed June 26, 2013

After 11 Hours, Texas State Senator's Filibuster Fails

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This was the scene last night in the Texas Capitol building.

(APPLAUSE)

MONTAGNE: Crowds who came out to support a nearly 11-hour filibuster by Democratic State Senator Wendy Davis erupted in screams in an attempt to stop a vote on a bill that would have forced all but a handful of abortion clinics in Texas to close. That's because, among other things, the bill would require clinics be upgraded to ambulatory surgical centers, something that the clinics say they can't afford.

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Europe
6:06 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Russian Official Encourages 'Food Patriotism'

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with health advice from Russia.

Gennady Onishchenko, the country's chief sanitary inspector, is encouraging food patriotism. Translation: More borscht - cut the meals at McDonald's. The fast food chain is popular in many Russian cities. But Mr. Onishchenko had more to say. To beat the summer heat, he said people should just get to work early, rather than wear, quote, "spotted little pants that stop above the knees." We think he's referring to shorts.

Politics
5:46 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Senate Bill Would Do Away With Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. In the midst of the housing crisis in 2008, the mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were brought into government hands. And today, over 90 percent of mortgages are guaranteed by the U.S. government. That's a potential burden for taxpayers if mortgages fail. Yesterday, a bipartisan Senate bill was introduced to try to unwind the government takeover, as well as Fannie and Freddie. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.

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Environment
5:42 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Coal Industry Concerned By Obama's Climate Change Plans

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And before leaving on his trip to Africa, President Obama had some other words on another subject. He announced a wide-ranging plan to address climate change. Rather than taking that plan to Congress and fighting it out, Obama is using his executive powers to implement it without new laws. The president wants the Environmental Protection Agency to restrict carbon-dioxide emissions from power plants. The biggest source of those emissions is coal-fired facilities.

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Africa
5:40 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Obama's Africa Trip To Focus On Democracy, Investment

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

President Obama flew home from Europe less than a week ago, and this morning, he is headed back overseas. This time, Air Force One is bound for Africa. It's a weeklong journey that will take the president and his family to three countries covering vastly different regions. This is Obama's first extended trip to the continent as president.

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Business
5:34 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Sprint Shareholders Approve SoftBank Merger

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a new wireless giant.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Sprint Nextel, the nation's third largest wireless carrier, is about to be bought out by Japan's SoftBank. The deal was approved by Sprint shareholders yesterday.

And as NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, this should boost competition.

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Middle East
5:31 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Jordan Accused Of Targeting Online Dissent

A Jordanian woman surfs the Web at an office in the Amman, Jordan, on Sept. 30, 2009. The country's government is under fire from media activists for blocking hundreds of websites across the kingdom.
Ali Jareki Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 2:43 pm

Jordan's King Abdullah vowed to make the desert kingdom a "free Internet" country as he began his rule more than a decade ago. On June 2, when local Internet providers were ordered to block hundreds of news websites across the kingdom, Web publishers protested the broken promise and international media watchdog organizations charged censorship.

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Law
5:27 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Voting Rights Ruling By Supreme Court Draws Mixed Reactions

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

As we've been hearing, the reaction to the court's decision was strong and immediate.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Obama said he was deeply disappointed and he called on Congress to act. Civil rights groups say they have lost the most powerful weapon in their effort to ensure equal access at the polls.

MONTAGNE: But as NPR's Pam Fessler reports, some lawmakers in states where voting laws changed - voting law changes were subject to federal approval are saying they're finally free of an unfair burden.

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Law
5:25 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Supreme Court Frees 9 States From Voting Laws Oversight

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

The U.S. Supreme Court usually saves its biggest decisions for the last few days of a term, and this year is no different.

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Law
5:21 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Supreme Court Sides With Adoptive Family In Dispute

Baby Veronica and her biological father, Dusten Brown, feed geese and ducks in April in Nowata, Okla.
Jeremy Charles for The Washington Post Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 7:21 pm

Baby Veronica still does not have a permanent home.

The adopted, 3-year-old Native American girl has been caught in the middle of an emotional custody battle that reached all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, whose ruling on Tuesday sided with her white adoptive parents, Matt and Melanie Capobianco.

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Business
5:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And that brings us to today's last word in business - which is: Courtesy Seating.

Jessie Frank was a distraught mom who was going to be late picking up her daughter at camp.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

She was on stand-by in Washington, D.C. for an over-booked Delta Flight to New York, when a man offered up his seat. Turns out it was Delta CEO Richard Anderson. His kindness helped the mom and earned some good PR for the company.

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The Two-Way
4:24 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Clock Runs Out On Controversial Texas Abortion Bill

The Texas Capitol rotunda filled with supporters of state Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, who filibustered a controversial abortion bill.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 7:38 am

The official clock ran out on Texas lawmakers overnight, which effectively killed a bill that would have dramatically restricted abortion in the nation's second most populous state. Hours of chaos and confusion in Austin finally lifted as Texas Senate leaders decided that the vote on Senate Bill 5 did not clear a constitutionally-mandated hurdle that it pass before midnight.

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History
3:30 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Old Safe Reveals Historical Relics Of Women's Suffrage Group

Safe cracker Elaad Israeli works the dial on an old safe found by the National Council of Women of the United States.
Margot Adler NPR

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Started in 1888 by suffragettes like Susan B. Anthony, the National Council of Women of the United States still exists today in a small office near the United Nations.

On the organization's 125th anniversary, it teamed up with the University of Rochester to open an old safe painted with the words "Woman Suffrage Party." No one knew what was in the safe or when it had last been opened.

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Sweetness And Light
3:29 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Let's Separate The Schoolin' From The Sports

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

We usually think of college sports in terms of classic big-time schools, polls and bowls.

But, in fact, our athletics are intertwined with — and complicate — all higher education.

The University of North Carolina, Wilmington provides a typical recent case. The Seahawks field teams in 19 Division One sports, but unfortunately, like many colleges, UNCW athletics are in the red, so the chancellor, Gary L. Miller, assembled a committee, which recommended the elimination of five sports: men's and women's swimming, men's cross country and indoor track and softball.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
3:28 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: On Media, The People, And Strife

Inspired by "Standing Man" Erdem Gunduz, protesters stand silently during an action at Istanbul's Taksim Square on June 23. Among the latest recommended reads from Tina Brown is a Foreign Affairs article on how Turkey's manipulates media coverage of political unrest.
Burak Kara Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Sometimes when there's a daily drumbeat of news — war, protest, unrest — it's good to find those moments to pause, dig deeper, and find layers of the story that are easy to miss.

Tina Brown, the editor of The Daily Beast, joins NPR's David Greene to help us do just that, as part of a recurring series Morning Edition calls Word of Mouth. This month, it's stories of global conflict and the media that — for good and for ill — cover those stories.

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Economy
3:26 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Real Estate Sizzles Again In Las Vegas

Las Vegas, the recession's foreclosure capital, is seeing a surge in single-family home prices.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 8:43 am

High-paying investors have helped Las Vegas' real estate prices to bloom in a place that once ranked as the country's foreclosure capital.

Thanks to these big-money investors as well as a shortage of supply, the median price for a single-family home in Vegas is up 32.8 percent from a year ago, according to the Greater Las Vegas Association of Realtors.

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U.S.
3:25 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Some Tech Companies Find Ways Not To Hire Americans

Tech workers looking for jobs may think twice before looking at job ads that are targeted at Americans but actually are intended for foreigners.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:31 am

Lawmakers continue to wrangle over a bill that would overhaul the nation's immigration system. One provision in this bill would allow companies to import a lot more skilled workers. The tech industry has lobbied hard for this, despite fears among some American workers about the extra competition.

Illinois Senator Dick Durbin says the bill has American workers covered. "Employers will be given a chance to hire a temporary foreign worker when truly needed. But first, they'll be required to recruit Americans. No exceptions, no excuses," he said.

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Asia
3:24 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Belly Dancing For The Dead: A Day With China's Top Mourner

Dingding Mao is a professional mourner, who is paid for her talents at singing the funeral dirge. This is a tradition that began in the Han dynasty 2,000 years ago.
Courtesy of Wu Peng

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 11:39 am

File under "one of the oddest jobs ever": professional mourner. China's funeral rituals date back 2,000 years to the Han dynasty, but were banned during the Cultural Revolution as superstition. Now these funeral rituals have become an income source to a select few who stage funeral extravaganzas, marrying ancient Chinese traditions with modern entertainment.

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The Two-Way
1:40 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Texas Lawmaker's 11-Hour Filibuster Ended On A Technicality

State Sen. Wendy Davis, a Fort Worth Democrat, dons pink tennis shoes during a Tuesday filibuster.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 10:42 am

By midnight Texas time, it was all over but the parliamentary inquiries. After a nearly 11-hour filibuster attempt by state Sen. Wendy Davis to block sweeping restrictions on abortion, the Republican-dominated Texas Senate successfully shut down the filibuster on points of order. (See update at the bottom of this post.)

"This is probably the worst night that I've experienced since I've been in the Senate, maybe since I've been in public life," said state Sen. Kirk Watson, a Democrat from Austin.

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Kitchen Window
12:03 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Helping Pasta Salad Dress For Success

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 3:08 pm

So many people have the wrong idea about pasta salad — that staple of the summertime picnic season. It's a complete dish (often with starch, vegetable and protein all together), it's happy to hang out in your basket for several leisurely hours without complaint and it doesn't require much more than a fork to enjoy al fresco. Far too often, though, it's just done wrong.

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