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Afghanistan
4:28 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Taliban's Fighting Season A Major Test Of Afghan Forces

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This past Friday in Afghanistan, a handful of Taliban militants paralyzed Kabul during an eight-hour standoff with Afghan security forces. This spring, the Taliban's attacks have been intensifying, and this year's fighting season is a major test of Afghan government forces. One month from now, they're supposed to be leading all security operations in the country, as NPR's Sean Carberry reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNFIRE)

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Food
4:28 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Gathering Around The 'Global Grill'

Bon Appetit editor Adam Rapoport compiled recipes from all over the world for The Grilling Book. Pictured here are Chicken Yakitori.
Courtesy of Peden + Munk

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:36 pm

Grilling is a pillar of the American summer and the world's oldest form of cooking. From Latin America to Africa, grilling is at the heart of many cultures. This summer All Things Considered is setting out to explore some of them with the "Global Grill" series.

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Theater
4:28 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

New Plays Turn Passive Audience Members Into Participants

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

Several productions in New York's smaller theaters aren't content with providing passive experiences — the audience is asked to participate. Here Lies Love, a new David Byrne musical about Imelda Marcos at the Public Theater, is set in a disco and the audience moves around, from scene to scene, dancing all the while. Natasha, Pierre and the Comet of 1812, is an electronic pop opera based on a portion of Tolstoy's War and Peace, and is set in a Russian restaurant where audiences are served a meal and vodka as part of the performance.

The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

McCain Meets With Rebels In Syria

Sen. John McCain, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, briefly entered Syria to meet with rebel forces on Monday, according to his spokesman.
Allison Shelley Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:42 pm

Arizona Sen. John McCain spent his Memorial Day in Syria. As NPR's Jonathan Blakley reports from Beirut, McCain's spokesman says the senator crossed into northern Syria from Turkey to meet with rebels in the country, ripped apart by the 2-year conflict turned civil war.

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Found Recipes
3:22 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

What's Your Favorite Taste Of Summer?

For NPR producer Melissa Gray, nothing says summer more than a cold glass of limeade.
booleansplit/via Flickr

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:01 pm

If your motivation plummets during summer's hot and sweaty days, a sweltering kitchen may be the last place on earth you want to be.

But despite the season, we still need to eat and drink. A good story and recipe can go a long way to raising your spirits and divert attention from how miserable you are.

All Things Considered wants to know which recipes give you that boost in the summer.

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Parallels
3:06 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Palestinian Used Imprisoned Husband's Sperm To Get Pregnant

Red Cross vehicles outside Israel's Ofer prison, between Jerusalem and Ramallah.
David Vaaknin Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:40 am

Israeli prison officials invited reporters last month on a first-ever tour of the Ofer prison, a concrete-and-barbed wire compound on the northern edge of Jerusalem. More than 700 Palestinians are detained here for alleged security violations in connection with the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

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Author Interviews
2:14 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Marking The Moment With A Meaningful 'Exit'

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. From saying goodbye to the kids in the morning to leaving a job after 25 years to the end of life, exits are universal. Long or short, big or small, we've all left home or ended friendships or marriages.

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Parallels
2:13 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

'We Are Not Valued': Brazil's Domestic Workers Seek Rights

Cassia Mendes, who has worked as a housekeeper for more than 20 years, cleans a house in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Feb. 19, 2012. Brazil enacted on April 2 a constitutional amendment to grant domestic workers health insurance and other benefits.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

The phone is ringing off the hook at the crowded waiting room at the Domestic Workers Union in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil.

In the past decade, millions of Brazilians have joined the middle class. Advocates say this isn't just the result of a growing economy or social spending, but also laws like the one just passed that enshrine domestic workers' rights.

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Medical Treatments
2:11 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Is There A Doctor Aboard? Medical Emergencies In The Clouds

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Pop Culture
2:11 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

From 'Groovy' To 'Slacks,' The Words That Date You

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION from NPR News. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Cathy, a fifth-grade teacher in Stryker, Ohio, wrote to tell us that she elicited giggles when she complemented a student's footwear and called them thongs. A self-described ex-hippie named Paul emailed that he catches himself using the phrase, that's heavy. Sooner or later, once common words or phrases take on new meanings or just seem way, way out of date. Call and tell us about the term you've used that dates you.

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Parallels
2:10 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Let Them Eat Grass: Paris Employs Sheep As Eco-Mowers

Sheep used to replace gas-guzzling lawn mowers graze at a truck warehouse at Evry, south of Paris.
Francois Mori AP

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:02 pm

City officials in Paris are experimenting with an unconventional way to keep urban lawns trimmed.

Agnes Masson used to be simply the director of the Paris city archives. Now, she's also a shepherdess of sorts, responsible for four black sheep munching the lush grass surrounding the gray archives building at the eastern edge of the city.

Masson says the ewes are efficient and easy to care for.

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The Impact of War
2:10 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

A Grim Task: Military-Death Notification

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 2:11 pm

Among the many thousands of men and women who chose to serve in the military, few volunteer for the duty of death notification. As the nation honors those killed in the line of duty, those who work intimately with the families of the fallen share their stories. (Originally broadcast May 29, 2006.)

Music
2:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Keith Jarrett: 'I Want The Imperfections To Remain'

Keith Jarrett, Jack DeJohnette and Gary Peacock's new album of standards is titled Somewhere.
Daniela Yohannes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

Sometimes records have to steep. Four years after it was recorded live in Lucerne, Switzerland, an album of six standards called Somewhere is finally getting a proper release. Keith Jarrett and his trio, including bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette, just weren't happy with the sound of the room or the circumstances at the time. Listen to Somewhere, however, and none of that comes across.

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World Cafe
2:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Next: Ace Reporter

Ace Reporter.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 12:18 pm

  • Hear Two New Songs By Ace Reporter

After a band breakup, musician Chris Snyder consoled himself with the challenge of what he called "the threesixfive project": a challenge to write a song every day for a year. This one-man band ended up with 10 songs that stuck, and those formed his debut album, Yearling.

The Brooklyn multi-instrumentalist eventually got a chance to revisit the recordings, which initially were little more than sketches, in an upstate New York studio. Listen to two songs from Yearling here.

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Remembrances
2:00 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Jake McNiece, WWII Hero And Self-Described 'Troublemaker'

On June 5, 1944, Jake McNiece (right) led a group of paratroopers in World War II. After he shaved his head and painted his face before dropping behind German lines for D-Day, the look caught on with his men.
U.S. Military

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 7:14 pm

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who have died this year.

The Dirty Dozen was a Hollywood hit, but it was based — loosely — on a true-to-life WWII paratrooper regiment. Jake McNiece led the group, whose exploits inspired the 1967 movie and earned the nickname "The Filthy Thirteen." McNiece died in January at the age of 93.

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Afghanistan
1:55 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Service Members Observe Memorial Day Through Sweat And Tears

U.S. Army Sgt. Michael Johnson trains at Bagram Air Field for the Memorial Day Murphy, a CrossFit workout honoring a Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan in 2005.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

At Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan, Staff Sgt. Michael Johnson exercises under a long, steel framework set on a wooden platform. It looks like a giant jungle gym. Above his head are pull-up bars and rings. A climbing rope is off to one side.

It's here where he and dozens of other soldiers and sailors will remember the fallen, just after sunrise, on Memorial Day. They'll all take part in a grueling exercise regimen, part of CrossFit, the popular high-intensity workout program.

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Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Quincy Jones: The Man Behind The Music

Legendary music producer Quincy Jones.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:33 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 5, 2001.

Quincy Jones is one of those people to whom the word "legendary" is often attached. So it was no surprise when, on May 18, the 80-year-old Jones was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame.

Jones grew up poor on the south side of Chicago during the Depression, but moved to Seattle when he was 10. It was there, as a teenager, that Jones befriended and began collaborating with Ray Charles — a friendship that would remain strong until Charles' death in 2004.

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Mountain Stage
12:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn On Mountain Stage

Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 9:24 am

Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn appear here on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia Wesleyan College. Although Washburn and Fleck have been on the show several times with numerous projects over the years, this was their first appearance anywhere as a duo.

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Commentary
11:18 am
Mon May 27, 2013

After WWII, A Letter Of Appreciation That Still Rings True

U.S. Navy sailors form a ceremonial guard at a wreath-laying ceremony to memorialize the victims of the attack on Pearl Harbor and pay tribute to the veterans of World War II in front of the Lone Sailor statue at the Naval Memorial in Washington, D.C., in December 2003.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:43 am

In the fall of 1945, my father was honorably discharged from the Navy. He was one of the lucky ones. He'd served on a destroyer escort during the war, first in convoys dodging U-boats in the Atlantic and then in the Pacific where his ship, the USS Schmitt, shot down two kamikaze planes. My dad always kept a framed picture of the Schmitt above his dresser, but, like most men of his generation, he didn't talk a lot about his war years.

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Author Interviews
8:33 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Questions For Barbara J. King, Author Of 'How Animals Grieve'

iStockphoto.com

Attributing human characteristics to animals makes for great cartoons, but it's not usually considered rigorous science. Now, a new book argues that animals do think and feel in ways similar to humans.

Barbara J. King is a professor of anthropology and a commentator on NPR's science blog, 13.7. And her book, How Animals Grieve, makes a powerful case for the presence of love, affection and grief in animals — from a house cat mourning her lost sister to elephants who pay respects to the bones of their matriarchs.

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