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Law
2:02 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Lawyers Release Boy Scouts' 'Perversion Files'

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 1:46 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. After a two-year battle in court, lawyers in Portland, Oregon, said - last hour - that they'd release hundreds of confidential files kept by the Boy Scouts of America, on men they suspected of sexual abuse. The files went public online, within the last few minutes.

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Environment
2:02 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Athena To Zeus: Weather Channel Names Winter Storms

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 2:32 pm

Transcript

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Sports
2:02 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Lessons Learned From The Lance Armstrong Scandal

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 2:29 pm

Lance Armstrong has resigned from his charity and lost millions of dollars in endorsements, days after the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency released its report alleging a widespread doping conspiracy inside his cycling team. In the court of public opinion, at least, the verdict seems to be in on Armstrong.

The Two-Way
1:56 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Google's Stock Drops After Premature Release; 'PendingLarry' Goes Viral

Google CEO Larry Page. What's he going to say now?
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 3:05 pm

Oops.

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It's All Politics
1:56 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

A Watch Party In China For The U.S. Presidential Debate

The Shanghai skyline
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 2:21 pm

Gathering voters to watch a presidential debate and then evaluate it is a long tradition in American journalism. So, I got to thinking: What would happen if I invited a bunch of interested foreigners — all of them Chinese citizens — to watch the presidential debate from my Shanghai office?

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Shots - Health News
1:41 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

With An Army Of Vaccinators, India Subdues Polio

An Indian child receives the oral polio vaccine. Twice a year, an army of 2 million volunteers fans out across India to administer the vaccine. India has not reported a single case of polio in more than a year-and-a-half.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:31 pm

All this week, we've been examining the world's last remaining pockets of polio, a disease for which there is no cure. India marked a milestone when the World Health Organization struck it from the list of polio-endemic countries in February after no new cases were reported for more than a year. From Delhi, NPR's Julie McCarthy reports on how, despite poverty and poor sanitation, the world's second-most populous country is eradicating the disease.

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The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Winter Outlook: Above Normal Temps In West; Below In Southeast

Jan. 21, 2012: A winter scene in Brooklyn, N.Y. Snow may be a relatively rare sight this coming winter in the U.S.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 2:12 pm

Here are some of the details from the winter weather forecast released this morning by the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center:

-- There are "enhanced chances for above normal temperatures across most of the western half of the lower 48 states."

-- The Florida peninsula is likely to experience "below-normal temperatures."

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Shots - Health News
12:29 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Old Drug Gets A Second Look For TB Fight

Under the microscope, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. The germs that cause TB have become resistant to many drugs.
Janice Haney Carr CDC

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:04 pm

A small study offers a bit of cautious optimism about the prospects for treatment of tuberculosis, one of humankind's most ancient scourges.

This week's New England Journal of Medicine has a report showing that adding a 12-year-old antibiotic called linezolid, brand name Zyvox, to existing treatments cured nearly 90 percent of patients with a form of tuberculosis resistant to both first- and second-line antibiotics.

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Mississippi Queen: My Race Wasn't A Factor In Homecoming Title

University of Mississippi Homecoming Queen Courtney Pearson, as she was escorted on to the football field last Saturday by her father, Cmdr. Kerry Pearson.
Robert Jordan UM Communications
  • Michel Martin talks with Courtney Pearson

Courtney Pearson just became the first African-American woman to be elected homecoming queen at the University of Mississippi.

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The Salt
11:53 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Top Five Myths Of Genetically Modified Seeds, Busted

Central Illinois corn and soybean farmer Gary Niemeyer readies his genetically modified seed corn for spring planting at his farm near Auburn, Ill.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 5:49 pm

Having just stepped into the shouting match over patents on genetically engineered crops, there are a few small things that I, too, would like to get off my chest.

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Alt.Latino
11:13 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Te Amo, Te Odio: New Latin Songs Of Love And Hate

Paula Maffia is the lead singer of Argentina's La Cosa Mostra.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:40 pm

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Thu October 18, 2012

50 Years Later, Ole Miss Crowns Homecoming History

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:25 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we want to tell you about history that was just made on a campus that is full of history, some of it difficult. Just a few days ago, a young woman was crowned homecoming queen at her university. And you might think, well, that's nice, but that happens all the time.

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Thu October 18, 2012

'Black Friday' Haunts Market, 25 Years On

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:25 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, Courtney Roxanne Pearson was just crowned homecoming queen at her university last weekend. We hope you'll stick around to hear why she feels this is about more than a tiara and a title.

But first, tomorrow is the 25th anniversary of what is known in financial circles as Black Monday. And if you were watching the news at the time, then you probably heard a report that sounded something like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS REPORT)

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Late T.V. Host Inspired By 'Some Nights' Up Late

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:25 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Does Candidates' Debt Math Add Up?

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:25 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we take a look back 25 years to the 1987 stock market crash, which some people still call Black Monday. We'll talk about how that even compares to the more recent market turmoil and if there's anything we can learn from it about market ups and downs today.

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NPR Story
11:05 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Legs Lost, But Still Climbing High

Spencer West at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro.
Courtesy of Free the Children

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 8:21 am

A lot of people would like to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. At a little over 19,000 feet above sea level, it is Africa's highest peak. Many want to do it to raise money for a cause or just to prove to themselves or the world that they can. And some people, like Spencer West, actually make it to the summit.

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The Picture Show
10:41 am
Thu October 18, 2012

What Big Highways Mean For China's Small Villages

Torukun, the eldest daughter of the Kuruman family (third from right), with her father, mother-in-law, sister-in-law and nephews, poses for a photograph outside her house. Torukun raises cattle and lives in a village away from her parents.
Go Takayama

Over the past decade, China has been on an infrastructure tear, investing hundreds of billions of dollars in transportation expansions. According to The Wall Street Journal, some 30,000 miles of expressway were paved in the 10 years before 2008, and future plans indicate China's highways will stretch 53,000 miles by 2020 — surpassing the 47,000 miles of interstate currently in the U.S.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:27 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Simone Dinnerstein's Bach Between The Notes

Simone Dinnerstein communes with the music of J.S. Bach at the NPR studio.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 10:49 am

There's something about Johann Sebastian Bach's music that nourishes musicians. Pianist Andras Schiff and cellist Yo-Yo Ma have said that they play Bach almost every day — like having breakfast, it seems essential for them.

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Thu October 18, 2012

For One Night, Obama And Romney Will Trade Jokes, Not Jabs

Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain (left) and Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama at the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner on Oct. 16, 2008. At center is Bishop Edward Michael Cardinal Egan.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

After sharp words on the debate stage Tuesday and after weeks of tough talk about each other on the campaign trail, President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney face a different kind of challenge tonight:

They have to be funny about each other and about themselves.

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It's All Politics
9:40 am
Thu October 18, 2012

How Conservatives Learned To Love Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney greets supporters at a campaign rally Wednesday in Chesapeake, Va.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 10:00 am

As recently as last month, it was clear that a lot of Republicans were unhappy with their presidential nominee, Mitt Romney.

When I would ask GOP voters how they felt about Romney at campaign rallies or at their doorsteps, many made sour faces, like they were swallowing chalk. They offered their most backhanded endorsements, saying things like, "He wasn't my first choice," or, "He's who we've got."

It was clear they would vote for him, but for many it was not out of love — it was out of disdain for President Obama.

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