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Asia
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

S. Korean Community Waits And Prays For Its Missing Students

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. For the first time since a ferry capsized and sank off the coast of South Korea Wednesday, divers have begun to recover bodies from inside the sunken vessel. The death toll has passed 50 with more than 250 still missing. Most of the passengers were students from a single high school outside the capital city. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on the community and how they're coping.

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Asia
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Measures Of Change After Bangladesh Garment Factory Collapse

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

One year ago, the clothing manufacturing industry suffered its deadliest accident in history. An eight-story building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 people. Many were garment workers making cheap clothes for U.S. and European manufacturers. At the time, those corporations came under intense pressure for lax safety standards. To find out if and how the industry has responded, I'm joined by Steven Greenhouse. He's a labor and workplace reporter for the New York Times. Thanks so much for being with us.

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Europe
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Ukraine's Divide, Too Broad For Easter To Bridge?

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Africa
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Conservationist Shot In Africa's Oldest Nature Preserve

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. In the Democratic Republic of Congo this past week, a noted conservationist is recovering from gunshot wounds after an attack by unknown assailants. Forty-three-year-old Emmanuel de Merode is a Belgian Prince. He is also the director of Africa's oldest nature preserve, Virunga National Park. It's a world heritage site and one of the most bio diverse places on Earth. Nearly a quarter of the world's critically endangered mountain gorillas live in the park.

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Author Interviews
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Exploring The Secret History Of The Cubicle

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 11:34 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now to a topic you may be intimately familiar with, the office - the paperwork, the cubicles, the potentially awkward social dynamic. It is an almost universal experience that's been baked into our pop-culture, like in the movie "Office Space."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "OFFICE SPACE")

GARY COLE: (As Bill Lumbergh) Hello, Peter. What's happening? Uh, we have sort of a problem here. Yeah, you apparently didn't put one of the new cover sheets on your TPS reports.

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Sports
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

How NBA Players Get Rest In An 82-Game Season

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Food
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So you thought smoking in restaurants was out. Well, you are right, of course. Smoking cigarettes in restaurants and bars is definitely taboo, but another kind of smoking is pretty popular in the culinary scene these days. WEEKEND EDITION food commentator Bonny Wolf tells us more.

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History
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Remembering Harriet Quimby, A Daring Female Pilot

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now for a story about another kind of traveler. This one from Nate DiMeo who tell stories from America's past on his podcast "The Memory Palace."

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Around the Nation
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Flawlessly Remote: Visiting America's Least-Visited National Park

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's time for Wingin' It. This week, we're going to take you to a place that's been called the moon crater of Alaska - Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve. It's one of the least visited places in the national park system. You won't find any signs marking the entrance, and it's not even accessible by road. Christopher Solomon is a travel writer and was one of the very few people to visit Aniakchak last year. I spoke with him about his journey and started by asking him how he got there.

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Around the Nation
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Legal At Last, Colorado's Pot Contest Gets Competitively Mellow

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today, some 30,000 people will converge in Denver, Colo. for the 5th annual Cannabis Cup, a marijuana festival and tradeshow. It's the first time the event is being held after legal marijuana sales went into effect January 1 of this year. To learn more about the event, we're joined by Ricardo Baca. He's the editor of "The Cannabist" blog at the Denver Post. Thanks so much for being with us, Ricardo.

RICARDO BACA: Hey. Thank you.

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Around the Nation
8:05 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Organizers Predict Huge Crowd For Boston Marathon

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Alt.Latino
5:14 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Happy Birthday, El Rey! 10 Fiery Tito Puente Cuts

Tito Puente on vibraphone at the Palladium.
Courtesy of the artist

Celebrating the late Tito Puente's birthday gives us a chance to revel in his mid-1950s RCA years. Backed by major label money, the King of Latin Music was able to realize the sounds he heard in his head on bandstands and in recording studios.

This meant big band dance music, agile soneros whose improvised vocals complimented the bands and small-group percussion experiments.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
5:12 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Advice From Women About Negotiating For A Raise: Just Ask

Many of the women who told us their stories said they didn't negotiate terms for their first job offers because they didn't know they could.
Thomas Barwick Getty Images

Twice Juno Schaser asked for a raise. Twice she was turned down, she says. If her group of female friends is any indication, it's a common experience.

" 'At least they'll respect you for trying,' " a friend told Schaser, a 23-year-old museum publicist.

"I think I'd feel more respected if I was paid at the same level as my male co-workers," Schaser says.

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Code Switch
5:12 am
Sun April 20, 2014

The Golden Arch Of The Universe Is Long ...

McDonald's ad, 1972.
Ebony Magazine

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 9:42 am

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Three Books...
5:11 am
Sun April 20, 2014

All Grown Up? Three Books About The Mystery Of Coming Of Age

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:42 pm

Some books have a subject so timeless as to be almost mythic — it's as though these stories are reinvented each time a new book appears, since the subject is right at the heart of what it means to be human. Coming of age books, if they are any good, have this mythic quality. Here are three that are at the top of the scale.

What does it mean to grow up? And why are adults so fascinated by this transition from the innocent to the knowledgeable?

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The Two-Way
4:43 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Relatives Grieve As Divers Pull Bodies From S. Korean Ferry

Rescue workers carry the body of a passenger from the ferry that sank Wednesday off the coast of South Korea.
Lee Jin-man AP

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 7:31 am

The recovery operation at the site of a sunken ferry off the South Korean coast continues Sunday, as police boats brought bodies ashore to the deafening cries and screams of family members, said CNN.

The grim work is just beginning: About 250 people are still missing. The death toll now stands at 52, South Korean disaster officials told reporters Sunday. Twenty-three of the dead are students.

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National Security
5:49 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Training For An Uncertain Military Future In The Calif. Desert

Soldiers assigned to the 120th Combined Arms Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, participate in desert training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., in 2009.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 10:51 am

In the middle of the Mojave Desert, between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, there is a place that looks just like Afghanistan.

There are villages with houses, shops, a mosque and a marketplace. But it is all a facade. The area is actually a U.S. Army installation, the Fort Irwin National Training Center. If you want to see how a decade of fighting has profoundly changed the way the U.S. prepares its soldiers for war, this is where you come.

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Asia
5:09 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

The Players In The Battle For India's Soul

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 6:28 pm

The numbers from India's election are staggering: 814 million potential voters, nine stages of voting over six weeks. They are the biggest in the world. Correspondent Julie McCarthy talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the candidates vying for power.

World
5:09 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Russia's Military: Threatening Enough To Avoid Using Force?

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 6:28 pm

Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.

World
5:09 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Despite Easter 'Truce,' Standoff In Ukraine Appears Steadfast

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 6:28 pm

In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.

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