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Europe
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

12 People Dead After Attack On French Satirical Magazine

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 10:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Euro Falls To 9-Year Low Against U.S. Dollar

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

French Government Organizes Massive Manhunt To Find Gunmen

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Brain Scans May Help Predict Future Problems, And Solutions

By measuring activity in different parts of the brain, neuroscientsts can get a sense of how some people will respond to treatments.
John Lund Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 5:55 pm

Brain scans may soon be able to help predict a person's future — some aspects of it, anyway.

Information from these scans increasingly is able to suggest whether a child will have trouble with math, say, or whether someone with mental illness is going to respond to a particular treatment, according to a review of dozens of studies published Wednesday in the journal Neuron.

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Health
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Why The U.S. Still Bans Blood Donations From Some U.K. Travelers

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

Rules governing who can donate blood in the United States have recently changed. But anyone who spent more than three months in the UK between 1980 and 1996 is still prohibited from donating. That rule is in place to minimize the risk of spreading Mad Cow Disease. Robert Siegel speaks with Dr. Lorna Williamson about how the risk is mitigated in the UK.

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Energy
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Cape Cod's Offshore Wind Project In Jeopardy

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

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Economy
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Growth In Manufacturing Tempered By Low-Wage Jobs

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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New cars, and plenty of them, are driving off the sales lot - 16.5 million in the last year, in fact. It's the best performance for the U.S. auto industry since 2006.

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Around the Nation
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

NYPD Commissioner Is A Man Caught In The Middle

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

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Around the Nation
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

In Midwest, Bitterly Cold Temps Keep Students At Home

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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Technology
5:11 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

FBI Offers New Evidence Connecting North Korea To Sony Hack

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:17 pm

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The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Sorry, No Space Heaters: Hawaii Copes With Record Cold

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 6:58 pm

Blankets, layers of heavy clothes and thermal socks are some of the ways Hawaii residents are trying to stay warm in a cold snap that has brought record lows. As temperatures hit the 50s, some stores sold out of space heaters.

The cold has been brought on by winds from the north and dry air. And we're not talking about snow and ice on the peaks of Hawaii's volcanic mountains. The cooler air is hitting people where they live, accompanied by strong winds.

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The Two-Way
4:29 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

French Media, Public Rally Behind 'Charlie Hebdo'

Pens are thrown on the ground during a vigil in Paris following a deadly attack at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, the weekly satirical magazine.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 8:58 pm

This much is certain: Charlie Hebdo will live another day.

The magazine, which was the target of a deadly attack Wednesday, will be kept going through financial and editorial backing from some of France's largest media groups.

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Parallels
3:53 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Life Flows Back Into The Waters Of Baghdad's Tigris

Young members of the Baghdad Rowing Club practice on the river Tigris, close to the University of Mustansiriyah in the Iraqi capital.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 1:15 am

Some of the world's loveliest cities hug great rivers. Budapest curves around the Danube, London's gracious gray buildings look out on the Thames.

Baghdad doesn't conjure so easily the idea of lingering on a bridge, watching boats glide by, but the city's river Tigris is as wide and wet as the Seine or the Nile, and Baghdadis have fun on it too.

Last weekend, moored next to the Mutanabbi Street book market was a big white party boat, with tinsel and silk roses festooning its rails and pop music shaking its deck.

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Planet Money
3:25 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Episode 222: The Price Of Lettuce In Brooklyn

Charlie Neibergall ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 12:40 pm

Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in October 2010.

On today's Planet Money, we go shopping with George Minichiello.

George is one of hundreds of federal employees who goes to stores all over the country and record the prices of thousands of different things. A bag of romaine lettuce. A boy's size-14 collared shirt made of 97 percent cotton. A loaf of white bread.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Former Korean Air Executive Faces Prison Over 'Nut Rage'

Cho Hyun-ah, center, a former vice president of Korean Air, faces charges of impeding the inquiry into a possible breach of aviation safety laws. She was arrested last Tuesday.
Ahn Young-joon AP

A week after she was arrested over a tantrum on a tarmac in New York, former Korean Air executive Cho Hyun-ah faces charges of breaking aviation safety laws and then interfering with the inquiry into the incident.

Cho was indicted on those charges today, placing her under the threat of possibly spending years in prison. She was arrested on Dec. 30 along with two others — an airline executive and an official at the Transport Ministry — who are accused of working to undermine the investigation.

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The Record
2:41 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Musicians You'll Tell Your Friends About In 2015

Austin-based Charlie Belle, led by 16-year-old Jendayi Bonds (center) along with her brother Gyasi Bonds (left) and Zoe Czarnecki, will release a debut EP on Jan. 13.
Barclay Ice & Coal Courtesy of the artist

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World Cafe
2:36 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Merge Records At 25

Superchunk bandmates Laura Ballance (left) and Mac McCaughan (second from left) founded Merge Records in 1989.
Jason Arthurs Courtesy of the artist

The label that's brought you Arcade Fire, Spoon, The Magnetic Fields, Neutral Milk Hotel and Superchunk turned 25 last year. Superchunk bandmates Laura Ballance and Mac McCaughan formed Merge Records just to release singles from their band and friends in 1989.

On this episode of World Cafe, we'll discuss the label's emergence as a major force. We'll also hear performances from Superchunk, Telekinesis, The Rock*A*Teens and others recorded at last summer's 25th-anniversary Merge Festival in Carrboro, N.C.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

After Deadly Attacks, What's Next For France's Charlie Hebdo?

A man holds up a Charlie Hebdo magazine during a rally at the Place Royale in Nantes on January 7, 2015, to show solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. (Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images)

Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine that came under deadly attack Wednesday, has long fought its critics with controversial cartoons.

The magazine’s editor, Stephane Charbonnier, who goes by the pen name Charb, often defended his freedom of speech, even if that meant offending religious conservatives.

Here & Now’s Robin Young spoke with Julian Borger of The Guardian for a closer look at Charlie Hebdo’s past and what this attack may mean for the magazine’s future.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Charlie Hebdo Editor Knew The Risks

French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo's editor Stephane Charbonnier, known as Charb, clenches his fist as he presents to journalists, on September 19, 2012 in Paris (Fred Dufour/AFP/GettyImages)

Charlie Hebdo magazine editor Stephane Charbonnier, reportedly among the dead in today’s attack, said he knew the risks of penning religious cartoons, including those depicting the Prophet Muhammad.

In 2012, following a fire bombing of then satirical paper, he spoke to Drew Rougier-Chapman, who is on the board of advisers to the Cartoonists Rights Network. Charbonnier, who was known as Charb, told Rougier-Chapman that he and his colleagues at Charlie Hebdo would not be deterred.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Is Sugar More Addictive Than Cocaine?

In 2014, Americans were eating more sugar than ever before -- on average, about 160 pounds a year. (howzey/Flickr)

The 2015 Dietary Guideline Advisory Committee just released new recommendations to limit added sugars to 10 percent of daily calories. Right now, Americans are eating more sugar than ever before — on average, about 160 pounds a year.

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