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NPR Story
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

School Lunch: Any Chicken In Those 'Food-Like Nubbins'?

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:26 pm

It took a Freedom of Information Act to get the Chicago Public Schools to disclose what's in the chicken nuggets they serve in their cafeterias. NPR's Scott Simon reveals the chemical contents.

NPR Story
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

PGA Puts On A Masters Without Tiger

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. I look forward all week to saying it's time for sports. The tigers without master - the Masters without Tiger? You know, it's so hard to imagine, I can barely say it. And the Indiana Pacers are swooning like Justin Bieber fans this week. We're joined now by NPR's Tom Goldman. Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Scott.

SIMON: So there was a slight glimmer of hope that the Pacers could be coming out of a tailspin, but alas...

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NPR Story
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

With A Wink And Nod To Fans, Movies Roll Post-Credit Scenes

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You know, there's no need to stop watching a movie just because it's over.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF")

MATTHEW BRODERICK: (As Ferris Bueller) You're still here? It's over. Go home.

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NPR Story
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Pentecostal Churches Accused Of Exploiting Cameroon's Poor

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Pentecostalism is the fastest-growing Christian denomination in the world. It has spread swiftly through sub-Saharan Africa, which is now home to nearly 45 percent of all of Pentecostals. In Cameroon, a mainly Christian nation that sits in the crook of West Africa, the church's explosive growth has attracted government attention and ire. Andres Caballero reports.

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NPR Story
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Guineans Scramble To Defend Themselves Against Deadly Virus

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:26 pm

A recent outbreak of Ebola in Guinea has the country on edge. Guineans have never experienced the deadly virus, and are learning quickly how to protect themselves.

Author Interviews
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Jackie Collins' Mob Princess Serves Up A Cookbook You Can't Refuse

Courtesy of St. Martin's Press

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 1:52 pm

Lucky Santangelo is a household name — at least, in those households where the shelves are packed with Jackie Collins novels. And considering there are more than 500 million copies sold, well, Santangelo's certainly got a fan base.

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Book News & Features
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

So You Need A Celebrity Book. Who Ya Gonna Call? Ghostwriters

You might not notice their names on their book covers — and sometimes they're not named at all. But ghostwriters don't mind the anonymity.
Hobvias Sudoneighm (striatic) Flickr

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 1:33 pm

The next time you're in a bookstore, take a look at the nonfiction shelf. See all those celebrity autobiographies — the memoirs of actors, athletes and politicians? Chances are, they're the work of a ghostwriter.

David Fisher is one of those invisible authors. He's ghostwritten over 70 books, adopting the voices of quarterback Terry Bradshaw, attorney Johnnie Cochran and actor and comedian Leslie Nielsen, among others.

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Around the Nation
9:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

A Year After Bombings, Boston Comes Back 'Strong'

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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All Songs Considered
9:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Bob Boilen's Weekly Rainbows

Kraftwerk at the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C. The band continues to break new ground in concert visuals.
Bob Boilen NPR

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Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Fresh Air Weekend: 'Nurse Jackie,' 'Mad Men' And 'Frozen'

Edie Falco plays ER nurse Jackie Peyton, who is competent at her high-stress job but struggles with addiction. The sixth season of Nurse Jackie starts Sunday on Showtime.
Ken Regan Showtime

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 4:30 pm

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Edie Falco On Sobriety, The Sopranos, And Nurse Jackie's Self-Medication: Falco plays ER nurse Jackie Peyton, who is competent at her high-stress job but struggles with addiction. The sixth season of Nurse Jackie begins Sunday on Showtime.

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Alt.Latino
9:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Borderland Music: Songs From The U.S.-Mexico Frontera

Ricky Munoz, lead singer of Intocalbe, performs in Juarez, Mexico earlier this month. Intocable, a band popular on both sides of the border, is inspired by Mexican music, country hits and rock bands like Def Leppard.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 11:01 am

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Armed Men Take Police HQ In Eastern Ukraine City

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 6:17 pm

More than a dozen armed men have seized a police station in the city of Sloviansk, near Ukraine's border with Russia. The pro-Russian group is one of several that have seized public government buildings in the past week. Ukrainian officials promise a "very tough" response.

Update at 6:00 p.m. ET: Vice President Biden Going To Kiev

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Tiny Desk Concerts
8:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Tom Brosseau: Tiny Desk Concert

Tom Brosseau performs a Tiny Desk Concert in February 2014.
Jim Tuttle NPR

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 11:03 am

Tom Brosseau possesses one of the most arresting voices in folk music today. Many people who hear him sing, without knowing his name or face, assume the voice belongs to a woman, as he hovers somewhere around the countertenor range, with an unusually pure tone.

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Code Switch
7:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Autism, Like Race, Complicates Almost Everything

Alicia Montgomery walks with her son near their home.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 12:40 pm

Children have tantrums. They yell and grab at things that they should ask for nicely. And when a child has autism, like my son, these episodes can be epic: toys hurled across a room, screaming fits that last hours, and flurries of hitting that get triggered by even a minor change in a routine.

But when my son screams at his therapist and tries to snatch Magic Markers from his hands, I gasp. I think of Trayvon Martin.

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My Guilty Pleasure
7:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Cursed With Mom Guilt? Charlie Brown Might Cure What Ails You

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:03 pm

The job description for a parent should be straightforward: The only requirement is the skill to do everything perfectly under the pressure of guilt.

Forget perfectly — even passably can be difficult. For a long time my older son only ate apples: apples for breakfast and apples for lunch and apples for dinner. "Offer him a variety of choices," said the pediatrician, as though I hadn't done that. Guilt. "Feed him ice cream — at least you get some protein and calcium and sugar into his body," said the pediatrician. Guilt.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:07 am
Sat April 12, 2014

A Debut Symphony That Embraced The World

Gustav Mahler wanted each of his symphonies to contain a world of emotions and ideas.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 10:55 am

Conducting Gustav Mahler's First Symphony is an exhilarating and demanding task. Although it's one of his shortest symphonies (at about 55 minutes), it is an epic journey that requires countless hours of analysis and examination of the score. Still, it is a thrilling process to peel back and reassemble the many layers of Mahler's music.

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Simon Says
5:07 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Dog Races The Rails To Manhattan — And Wins New Yorkers' Hearts

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 1:49 pm

Some stories can only happen in New York.

At 10:39 Tuesday morning, a Metro-North Hudson Line train left the Bronx for Manhattan when Joseph Delia, the engineer, saw a dog running alongside the track.

A small, frisky, brown-and-black dog, "just running like she didn't have a care in the world," Delia said.

When the train stopped at a signal, the little dog leapt in front of it, then began to race ahead of the commuter train. The dog stumbled a couple of times over ties in the track, but Joseph Delia hit his brakes.

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The Salt
5:06 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Gassy Cows Are Warming The Planet, And They're Here To Stay

These guys are gassy, and their emissions are contributing to global warming.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 3:43 pm

Sorry to ruin your appetite, but it's time to talk about cow belches.

Humans the world over are eating meat and drinking milk — some of us a little less, some of us a lot more, than years past. Farmers are bringing more and more cows into the world to meet demand, and with them escapes more methane into the atmosphere.

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Author Interviews
5:05 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Check It Out! A Photographic Tour Of America's Public Libraries

Shepherdstown Public Library in Shepherdstown, W.Va. (2011)
Robert Daweson Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:26 pm

Robert Dawson has been photographing public libraries across the country for almost 20 years. And now, just in time for National Library Week, he has published his photos in a new book called The Public Library. It includes reflections on libraries from Dr. Seuss, Amy Tan, E.B. White and others, but the stars of the book are the photographs, from the New York Public Library — which is as splendid as any great European cathedral — to libraries that are housed in shacks and shopping malls.

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Planet Money
10:17 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Episode 531: The Tough, The Sweet And The Nosy

Bureau of Internal Revenue Commissioner Kim Henares poses with her score following target practice in a firing range at suburban Mandaluyong city. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
Bullit Marquez AP

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 11:33 am

Millions of tax cheats never get caught. And the IRS seems powerless to stop them.

This isn't just a problem in the U.S. American taxpayers are Dudley Do-Rights compared to people in some other countries. On today's show, we head to some of the cheating-est places on earth to bring you tales from some of the roughest, toughest tax collectors around. These guys have tricks, tax collector mind-games, that they play to get people to do the right thing.

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