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Shots - Health News
5:01 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Ad For Surgical Robot Violated University of Illinois Policies

Doctors perform surgery with the da Vinci robot.
Intuitive Surgical AP

An internal review by the University of Illinois has found that an advertisement in which a university surgical team endorsed a pricey surgical robot violated school policies.

Though the team acted "in good faith," the review concluded, the episode pointed to the need for clearer rules and stronger enforcement.

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Sports
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Far From Home, South Sudanese Basketballer Finds Footing On Court

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

In three years, Mooseheart High School's basketball team went from also-ran to champion. One of the reasons? Mangisto Deng, a 6-foot-7-inch player from South Sudan. He tells of his journey and team.

Technology
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

U.S. Pulls Out Of ICANN — What Does That Spell For Internet Users?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Russian Flags Fly Over Ukrainian Base — But Who Stormed It?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Shots - Health News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

To Save Her Husband's Life, A Woman Fights For Access To TB Drugs

Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu fell in love while living at a tuberculosis ward in Balti, Moldova.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 9:13 pm

One year ago Pavel Rucsineanu was running out of options.

Drug-resistant tuberculosis was ravaging his lungs. And the disease had evolved into an incurable form, doctors said.

It's like an "infectious cancer," Dr. Tetru Alexandriuc said at the time. "We have no other medicines" to treat Pavel, the doctor added. Although he wouldn't say it, the doctor expected TB would kill Pavel.

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News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

As Iran Talks Wrap Up, Diplomats Get Specific

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

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Europe
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Tumult In Crimea Has Some Fearing A Cold War Redux

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Russia's annexation of Crimea has troubled its relations with the U.S. As Russia and the U.S. begin to trade sanctions in retaliation, analysts wonder if this spells a renewal of Cold War rivalry.

Politics
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Even Amid Tensions, Russia's PR Team Is At Home In D.C.

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Even as the United States and Europe ratchet up pressure on Russia, the Russian Federation has a lobbying team here in Washington. That might seem odd but it's not unusual, as NPR's Peter Overby reports.

PETER OVERBY, BYLINE: There's no mistaking how the United States feels toward the Russian Federation. Today, White House spokesman Jay Carney said the administration strongly condemns Russia's use of force in Crimea.

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News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In Airliner Search, Countries Still Wonder What Parts To Play

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

FBI investigators are now joining the hunt for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. It's one more instance of increasingly closer international cooperation in the search — though confusion persists.

Parallels
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Western Sanctions On Russia Are 'A Shot Across The Bow'

Russian President Vladimir Putin looks on as Crimean leaders sign a treaty for Crimea to join Russia on Tuesday. In response, Western countries have imposed limited sanctions.
Sergei Ilnitsky AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Russian officials were quick to mock the limited economic sanctions on Moscow announced by the U.S. and Europe this week. In response to Russia's annexation of Crimea, Western leaders have frozen the assets of a handful of government officials and also barred them from getting visas to travel to the West.

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News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In First Press Conference, New Fed Chair Goes Vague

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Federal Reserve policymakers say it's not your imagination, there has been an economic slowdown over the past few months. The pullback was partly due to the harsh winter weather. And today was Fed chair Janet Yellen's first opportunity to face the Washington press corps at the end of a two-day meeting.

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Health Care
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In ACA March Madness, Obama's Bracket Is Just A Role Player

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

In what's become an annual ritual, President Obama turned sports analyst today. He filled out his bracket for March Madness, the NCAA's college basketball tournament. Obama told ESPN he's picking Florida, Arizona, and Louisville to make the final four and Michigan State to win the national championship.

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Health
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Alzheimer's Diagnosis Expanding To Catch Early Warning Signs

Doctors may eventually be able to diagnose "preclinical" Alzheimer's in patients who have abnormal brain scans but who aren't yet showing behavioral symptoms of the disease.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 8:17 am

Alzheimer's disease isn't what it used to be. After 30 years of having doctors diagnose the disease by symptoms alone, researchers and advocacy groups are calling for new diagnostic criteria that recognize changes in the brain as well as changes in behavior.

The goal is to eventually allow doctors to diagnose "preclinical" Alzheimer's in patients who do not have problems with memory or thinking, but who do have an abnormal brain scan or some other sign that the disease may be developing.

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Around the Nation
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Grito: The Longest Shout You'll Hear Today, With A History

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 10:38 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Some of our NPR colleagues have been traveling the U.S.-Mexico border - all of it, in fact. MORNING EDITION's Steve Inskeep and several colleagues made plans for a drive from the mouth of the Rio Grande, on the Gulf of Mexico, all the way to Tijuana on the Pacific Coast. And we're broadcasting their reports on people, goods and culture crossing the border on many NPR programs.

Steve is at NPR West in Southern California. Hey there, Steve.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Hi, Audie.

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Politics
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Capitol's Immigration Stagnation Gets Dreamers Moving On The Border

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

With deportations at a record high under the Obama administration, and with immigration reform stalled in Congress, Dreamer protest groups are trying to keep the issue alive with actions of their own.

Education
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Pizza, Perseverance And Skills At A Major League Hackathon

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The University of Maryland, College Park has claimed the title Best School for Hackers. They have got the trophy to prove it. Maryland beat heavyweights like MIT, Stanford, Michigan and Carnegie Mellon and they did it by sending the most students to five hackathons last year. They placed first in two of them.

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Race
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

LAPD Pays Tribute To Josephine Serrano Collier, A Latina Pioneer

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 9:48 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A moment now to remember a woman who broke new ground on the LAPD. Josephine Serrano Collier(ph) was the first Mexican-American woman on the force. She's now died at age 91. NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji tells us more.

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News
4:31 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Toyota's $1.2B Settlement Puts Criminal Probe To Rest

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Toyota will pay $1.2 billion to end a federal criminal probe into a vehicle recall. Federal regulators said five people died in accidents related to unintended acceleration prior to the recall.

Shots - Health News
4:17 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Most U.S. Women Wouldn't Know A Stroke If They Saw Or Felt One

The rupture of a weakened portion of blood vessel (the dark blue spot in this brain scan of a 68-year-old woman) can prompt bleeding and death of brain tissue — a stroke.
Simon Fraser Science Source

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 10:04 am

When it comes to treating a stroke victim, every minute counts.

Each moment that passes without treatment increases the likelihood of permanent damage or death. So the first steps to getting help are being able to spot a stroke in yourself or others and knowing how to respond.

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Media
3:55 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

In The Absence Of Answers, We Return Repeatedly To The Questions

Jean-Paul Troadec (center), special adviser to France's aviation accident investigation bureau, speaks to journalists on Tuesday.
Lai Seng Sin AP

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 6:45 pm

The view from inside a media circus is an odd one, indeed.

But I got a glimpse of the scenery a few days ago, when CNN asked me to weigh in on the similarities between the real-life missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 and the myriad of fictional TV shows or movies where similar events have unfolded.

Why are we so drawn to these stories? anchor Suzanne Malveaux asked me in a few different ways, perhaps wanting an emotional take on how the plane crash scene in the TV series Lost or the film Alive could have ended Flight 370's mysterious voyage.

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