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From Our Listeners
4:09 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Letters: Jim DeMint And Kenny G

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Audie Cornish and Melissa Block read letters from listeners about Tea Party conservative Jim DeMint and a sneaky commentary on Kenny G.

Around the Nation
4:09 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Meet The Spellers Who Broke The Bee

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Here's a twist: A spelling bee that ends in a tie. Well, that's just what happened in Kansas City two weeks ago, but only one person can win. So the two spellers will battle it out once more tomorrow morning. Maria Carter of member station KCUR has the story.

JORDAN HOFFMAN: Spell madeleine.

SOPHIA HOFFMAN: Madeleine. Definition, please?

MARIA CARTER, BYLINE: That's 11-year-old Sophia Hoffman, a wisp of a girl with blonde hair. She's studying today with her older sister, Jordan.

HOFFMAN: It's a French pastry.

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Energy
4:09 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Concerns About Russia Fuel New Calls For Gas Exports

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Russia is the world's top natural gas exporter, but the U.S. is the top producer. Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, explains efforts to get American gas to Europe.

NPR News Investigations
4:09 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

U.S. Grave Science Marked By Risk Aversion And Bureaucracy

Elyse Butler for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:02 am

In part two of a joint investigation by NPR and ProPublica, we look at the agency charged with bringing home and identifying the 83,000 American war dead. It's stymied by an extreme aversion to risk. See the

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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News
4:09 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Border Patrol Revises Its Rulebook For Use Of Deadly Force

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The chief of the U.S. Border Patrol wants agents to limit their use of deadly force. The Border Patrol says agents have killed 10 people since 2010, while the ACLU says that number is 27. NPR's Ted Robbins reports on a directive issued today that outlines new guidance for the use of force against rock throwers and vehicles.

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Economy
4:09 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

February Jobs Numbers Give Some Economists Reason To Smile

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. There was some positive economic news today. Job growth in February was stronger than expected. The government monthly employment report showed 175,000 jobs were added to the economy last month. There were also upward revisions for December and January. As NPR's John Ydstie reports, that improvement comes despite evidence that stormy winter weather may have restrained job growth.

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Song Travels
4:07 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Tierney Sutton On 'Song Travels'

Tierney Sutton.
Courtesy of the artist

Jazz vocalist Tierney Sutton has headlined national venues, from Carnegie Hall to the Hollywood Bowl, and has earned five Grammy nominations. With her latest project, After Blue, Sutton takes on the genius of singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell.

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Movie Reviews
4:02 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

'Grand Budapest Hotel': Kitsch, Cameos And A Gloriously Stylized Europe

Ralph Fiennes plays Gustave H., a hotel concierge given to bedding his elderly guests, in Wes Anderson's latest film.
Bob Yeoman Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:46 pm

Wes Anderson has his share of groupies and his somewhat smaller share of skeptics who find him a tad precious. As someone who leans toward the precious view, but is open to his grace notes, I found The Grand Budapest Hotel mostly delightful.

It's a madcap comedy, but with hints of tragedy lurking outside the usual Anderson dollhouse frames. The central character is Gustave H., played by Ralph Fiennes. He's the concierge of a kitschy, opulent, high-class European hotel between World Wars I and II.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Border Patrol To Limit Use Of Deadly Force Against Rock Throwers

A Border Patrol agent looks to the north near where the border wall ends as it separates Tijuana, Mexico, left, and San Diego.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:17 pm

U.S. Border Patrol announced on Friday that it is changing its policy on using deadly force against moving vehicles and people who throw rocks.

The agency's chief, Michael J. Fisher, sent a memorandum to employees in which he said the policy is designed to help agents avoid dangerous situations.

This is an about-face for the agency.

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The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Lawmaker Wants To Ban Orcas At San Diego's SeaWorld

A trainer feeds killer whales ice chunks in a tank at SeaWorld in San Diego in this undated photo.
Sandy Huffaker/Barcroft Media Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:33 pm

A California lawmaker has proposed a measure that would prohibit SeaWorld San Diego from using orcas in its shows.

Richard Bloom, a Santa Monica Democrat, says the documentary Blackfish, which examines the 2010 death of a SeaWorld trainer who was killed by a captive orca, inspired him to push the bill.

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The Salt
3:18 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Why We Should Quit Tossing Fish Heads And Eat 'Em Up Instead. Yum!

The head of a cabezon fish prepared by the author.
Alastair Bland for NPR

About a decade ago, I backpacked the coastal desert of Baja California, Mexico, feasting daily on snapper and corvina that I caught and grilled whole over driftwood beach fires.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Rita Moreno, Part 2

Host Maria Hinojosa continues discussing work, love, and self-doubt with legendary actress Rita Moreno.

NPR Story
2:55 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

March Madness Sadness: A Look Back On The 1970 Season

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Forty-four years ago tonight, North Carolina State beat South Carolina 44-39 in double overtime to win the Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball Tournament in Charlotte, North Carolina. That wasn’t supposed to happen. And it left the captain of the team, Bobby Cremins, so heartbroken, he and another player on the team fled into the mountains of North Carolina for several days before they could return to the South Carolina campus in Columbia.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Basketball Roundup: Lakers Low Point And LeBron's Short Sleeves

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:29 pm

The Los Angles Lakers have won 16 NBA championships, but this season they probably won’t even make the playoffs. Last night they hit a real low point, losing to their neighborhood rivals, the Los Angeles Clippers, 142 to 94.

The 48-point loss was the worst in Lakers history. The Lakers weren’t the only ones who had a bad night. LeBron James of the Miami Heat made only six shots in a loss to the San Antonio Spurs, just a few days after he had poured in 61 points.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

New Rules Press Colleges To Improve Sexual Assault Procedures

President Teresa A. Sullivan addresses attendees of the national conference on student sexual misconduct, Feb. 10, 2013. (Dan Addison/UVA)

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:29 pm

The Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act takes effect today. It holds institutions of higher education responsible for the prevention of sexual violence, not just responding to it after assaults occur.

It also establishes standard procedures for disciplining those found guilty, and requires greater transparency on sexual violence policy and procedures, not just about rape but also domestic violence, dating violence and stalking.

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Code Switch
2:50 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

A Native American Tribe Hopes Digital Currency Boosts Its Sovereignty

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:35 pm

There's a lot of talk about virtual currencies lately — how they work, economic implications and whether they're safe. But now a Native American tribe is using a bitcoin-like currency to help strengthen its sovereignty.

In South Dakota, the Oglala Lakota Nation has become the first Native American tribe to launch its own form of virtual currency. Payu Harris, its creator, calls it mazacoin.

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Remembrances
2:31 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Fresh Air Remembers Surgeon And 'How We Die' Author Sherwin Nuland

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Because he was a doctor, Sherwin Nuland witnessed many deaths, including those in his own family. Dr. Nuland - who was a surgeon - was the author of "How We Die," an influential book about dying, which won a National Book Award. It was published in 1994. Twenty years after his book was published, Dr. Nuland himself died on Monday at his home in Connecticut from prostate cancer. He was 83.

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Interviews
2:30 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

'Americanah' Author Explains 'Learning' To Be Black In The U.S.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's short fiction has appeared in The New Yorker and Granta. She is also the author of the novels Purple Hibiscus and Half of A Yellow Sun.
Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 4:46 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on June 27, 2013.

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Alt.Latino
2:22 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Love Him Or Hate Him, Calle 13's Rene Perez Joglar Visits Alt.Latino

Puerto Rican musician and singer Rene Perez Joglar of Calle 13.
Alfredo Estrella AFP/Getty Images

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Tommy John Remembers Dr. Jobe, 'One Of The Greatest Surgeons'

Retired baseball pitcher Tommy John, left, and Dr. Frank Jobe at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in July 2013. Jobe was honored for the pioneering surgery he first performed on John's elbow in 1974.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:29 pm

His name is attached to a surgery that has saved many major league pitchers' careers.

But Tommy John knows that's an honor he came by thanks in large part to good luck.

"Fortunately for me, I was at the right place at the right time," he told All Things Considered host Melissa Block on Friday. "I happened to have one of the greatest surgeons of all time being the surgeon for the Los Angeles Dodgers."

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