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The Salt
6:28 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

What's The Most Important Thing Food Labels Should Tell Us?

Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Food labels have become battlegrounds. Just last week, voters in Washington state narrowly defeated a measure that would have required food manufacturers to reveal whether their products contain genetically modified ingredients.

Supporters of the initiative — and similar proposals in other states — say that consumers have a right to know what they're eating.

But there are lots of things we might want to know about our food. So what belongs on the label?

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It's All Politics
5:56 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Facing Media Blitz, Obama Leans On Football Metaphors

President Obama strikes the Heisman Trophy pose after he awarded the Commander-in-Chief Trophy to the Air Force Academy football team in April 2012.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:44 am

It's well known that President Obama is an avid sports fan: he had a basketball court installed at the White House shortly after taking office, fills out his NCAA tournament bracket on ESPN every year and often hits the links on weekends.

So it comes as little surprise that Obama leaned heavily on sports metaphors at his press conference Thursday, where he took responsibility for the problems the administration has experienced rolling out the Affordable Care Act and explained how he plans to fix things.

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The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
5:36 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

JFK's Lasting Economic Legacy: Lower Tax Rates

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 4:00 pm

As the young U.S. senator takes the oath to become president, he sets out to fix an economy struggling with rising unemployment, slumping profits and depressed stock prices.

He knows the deep recession could prevent him from advancing his broader domestic and diplomatic agenda. Yes — all true for President Obama.

But that's what John F. Kennedy faced as well. On his frosty Inauguration Day in January 1961, Kennedy had to start fulfilling his campaign pledge to "get America moving again." Like Obama, he would need to win over a deeply skeptical business community.

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Code Switch
5:36 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Code Switch Roundup: Mascots, Nurses And Yellow Dogs

Yellow Dogs, an indie band from Iran, fled to the United States in 2010 to avoid crackdowns on rock music. This past week, the band met tragedy in a murder/suicide.
Danny Krug AP

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The Record
5:34 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Business As Usual At The Brooklyn Electronic Music Festival

John Digweed, shown here performing in August at Electric Zoo, was one of the biggest names at the Brooklyn Electronic Music Festival last weekend.
Daniel Zuchnik Getty Images

Friday night at 1:45 a.m., at least a hundred people were on the main door line for Output, a dance club in Brooklyn that opened near the beginning of the year. They wouldn't be getting in for a while: the spot had reached capacity a half-hour before, shortly after the night's headliner, John Digweed, had begun his DJ set, and they were only letting in folks who'd bought tickets specifically for the show. "No wristbands," said the doorman. The wristbands were all-events passes for the sixth annual Brooklyn Electronic Music Festival (BEMF) — the nominal reason for Digweed's appearance.

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Middle East
5:31 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Saudi Arabia Cracks Down On Undocumented Workers

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The oil rich Arab states of the Persian Gulf typically depend heavily on foreign labor. In Saudi Arabia, according to the census there a couple of years ago, almost a third of the population of 27 million or so are foreign workers, typically low paid workers from Africa and Asia. This year, that system seems to be breaking down.

The Saudis are clamping down on illegal immigrants and that campaign has led to departures, protests, mass detentions, and scenes of violence in the streets of the capital, Riyadh.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Obama To Congress: 'Let's See' Before Any New Iran Sanctions

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 6:26 pm

President Obama on Thursday asked Congress to hold off on imposing any new economic sanctions on Iran to give negotiators more time to forge a deal on Tehran's nuclear program.

"My message to Congress has been that let's see if this short-term, phase-one deal can be completed to our satisfaction," Obama told reporters during a White House briefing.

"Let's test how willing they are to actually resolve this diplomatically and peacefully," he said.

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Asia
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

If Childbirth Isn't Hard Enough, Add An Earthquake And A Typhoon

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:38 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

When Typhoon Haiyan hit last Friday, parts of the country were already in desperate shape following a magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck October 15. The epicenter of that quake was under the island province of Bohol southeast of Tacloban. Since then, a number of makeshift medical facilities have been set up to treat patients with a wide range of issues.

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Asia
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Tacloban Begins To Bury The Dead As Aid Starts Coming In

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:39 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Nearly a week after a devastating typhoon slammed into the Philippines, the scale of the crisis is staggering. Millions of people across dozens of islands need help; that includes food, shelter and clean water. It also means help burying the dead. Some 2,000 people in the city of Tacloban are known to have died in the storm. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on what's being done about their bodies.

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All Tech Considered
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

For Ridesharing Apps Like Lyft, Commerce Is A Community

A Lyft driver in San Francisco drops off a passenger as a taxi passes by. The smartphone app lets city dwellers hitch rides from strangers.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:34 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog and aggregated at this link, and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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Around the Nation
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

150 Years Later, Newspaper Retracts Gettysburg Address Diss

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Silly remarks, that's how a Pennsylvania newspaper dismissed the Gettysburg Address after it was first delivered by President Lincoln. 150 years later, the Patriot-News of Harrisburg would like to take it back.

JOHN MICEK: We committed a bit of a clangor.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A clangor, also known as a blunder, blooper or faux pas. That's John Micek, the opinion page editor of the Patriot-News. He says the clangor took place back in 1863 when the paper went by the name of Patriot & Union.

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Around the Nation
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Boeing Continues Showdown With Its Largest Union

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Last night, members of Boeing's biggest union, its machinists, soundly rejected a company contract offer. Boeing's proposal would have cut pension and health care benefits in exchange for a promise to build the new version of its triple-seven jetliner at its Seattle area factory. The company said if the union voted no on the contract, it would look elsewhere for a place to build its new plane.

From Seattle, NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Health Care
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Counting Who's Bought Into Obamacare Is Tougher Than You Think

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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This Is NPR
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Turn Your Car Into The Public Radio Programs You Love

Paula Poundstone and her dream car.
courtesy of Car Talk

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 1:58 am

Paula Poundstone and Peter Sagal are in the towing business.

Well, sort of.

Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me! Host Peter Sagal and Panelist Paula Poundstone, along with Car Talk's Tom and Ray Magliozzi, and other NPR folks, have joined forces with Car Talk's Vehicle Donation Program, to tow listeners' cars in support of the programs they love.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
5:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Roald Dahl Wanted His Magical 'Matilda' To Keep Books Alive

Author Roald Dahl stands with his wife, American actress Patricia Neal, and their newborn daughter, Lucy, outside their home in Buckinghamshire, England, in August 1965. Roald Dahl died in 1990.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 10:26 pm

Every night, author Roald Dahl told his children a story: "Most of them [were] pretty bad," he admitted in a 1972 BBC4 interview, "but now and again you'd tell one and you see a little spark of interest. And if they ever said the next night, 'Tell us some more about that one,' you knew you had something. This went on for quite a long time with a story about a peach that got bigger and bigger and I thought, 'Well heck, why don't I write it.' "

That bedtime story became Dahl's first children's book, James and the Giant Peach.

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The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Denver's Smell-O-Scope Targets Marijuana's Skunky Scent

A man uses the Nasal Ranger to detect smells in the southern U.S., in this photo provided by St. Croix Sensory. In Denver, the device is being used to monitor complaints of strong marijuana smells.
Courtesy of Nasal Ranger

Recreational marijuana is legal in Colorado. But that doesn't mean residents want the air to smell like a pot rally. Denver is getting more calls to enforce an odor ordinance that can impose a buzz-killing fine on violators. To find them, the city relies on a device called the Nasal Ranger.

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Movie Reviews
5:02 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

A Rome Portrait, And What A 'Great Beauty'!

In The Great Beauty, aging journalist and cynic Jep Gambardella (Toni Servillo) is forced to look back on his own lavish life after a former love dies.
Gianni Fiorito Janus Films

The ghost of Federico Fellini hovers wickedly over The Great Beauty, a fantastic journey around contemporary Rome and a riot of lush imagery juggling past and present, sacred and profane, gorgeous and grotesque.

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Movie Reviews
5:02 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Alexander Sokurov, Seeking New Shadows In A Dark Classic

The man who makes the deal with the devil, played by Johannes Zeiler, is back onscreen in a new interpretation of the Faust story from director Alexander Sokurov.
Leisure Time Features

Siberia-born director Alexander Sokurov is best known in the West for 2002's Russian Ark, a cinematic waltz through the Hermitage Museum that also functions as a primer on Russian history. The filmmaker is an idiosyncratic historian, though, as he demonstrates yet again with a version of Faust that completes his "tetralogy of power."

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The Two-Way
4:42 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Images Of Tacloban: Before And After Typhoon Haiyan

A composite image of Tacloban, Philippines, before and after Typhoon Haiyan.
Google and DigitalGlobe

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 11:53 am

Typhoon Haiyan caused widespread destruction in parts of the Philippines when it tore through on Friday. One of the hardest-hit areas was the city of Tacloban and its more than 220,000 residents. "Virtually all of the structures, if they were not made out of concrete or steel, are gone," a top U.S. military commander said.

These satellite images from Google and DigitalGlobe show how Tacloban and the Anibong district looked in February 2012 and then two days after Haiyan made landfall.

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Shots - Health News
4:26 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Oregon Shines On Medicaid, As Texas Stalls On Sign-Ups

Kyle Thompson and his family are all going to have health coverage in Oregon, thanks to the state's successful effort to enroll people in Medicaid.
Kristian Foden-Vencil

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 7:29 pm

Oregon might be seen as a complete failure or a surprising success when it comes to its health insurance exchange.

One the one hand, the state's website has yet to allow a single person to enroll. That's a big problem for the folks who are hoping to qualify for subsidies and buy insurance that will start Jan. 1.

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