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4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

For Jim DeMint, Changing America Means Starting Small

Former Republican South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint left his seat last year to become president of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 9:37 pm

The Conservative Political Action Conference — better known as CPAC — kicks off its annual meeting in Washington, D.C., this week. It's a who's-who of Republican presidential contenders and marquee conservatives like Jim DeMint, a former senator from South Carolina who has played a key role in the rise of the Tea Party.

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Sports
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

From Afghanistan To Sochi, One Marine's Path To The Paralympics

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The crisis in Ukraine has prompted the U.S. and Britain to cancel their official delegations to the Paralympic Games for disabled athletes that are set to get underway later this week in Sochi, Russia. The athletes will still participate in sports from wheelchair curling to sled hockey, where the athletes are strapped onto sleds that balance on two skate blades. They use two sticks to propel themselves across the ice and handle the puck. It's really fast and really physical.

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Remembrances
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Alain Resnais, Director And Master Of Disorientation, Dies At 91

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The French filmmaker who shook up European cinema and offered inspiration to directors as varied as Woody Allen and David Lynch died on Saturday. Alain Resnais caused a sensation with his films "Hiroshima Mon Amour" and "Last Year at Marienbad" in the 1950s and '60s. Critic Bob Mondello offers an appreciation.

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Digital Life
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

What Your Data's Worth: Probably Not As Much As You Think

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 12:39 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Right now, information about the kind of purchases you make, the prescriptions you pay for, the stores and websites you frequent, it's all gathered up by data brokers. That data profile is then bought and sold, and the price is a lot lower than you might think. While your age, income, race, and other factors play a role, the cost of an individual profile is just a fraction of a penny. So what makes the data brokerage industry big business?

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Digital Life
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

If There's Privacy In The Digital Age, It Has A New Definition

A Google data center in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Even online privacy advocates acknowledge that keeping personal data out of the hands of third parties is virtually impossible today.
Connie Zhou AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

Collecting huge amounts of information about all of us and then using supercomputers to sift through, analyze and study it — this is a reality of modern life, and it can be a tremendously powerful thing.

Researchers can use techniques like those to identify genetic markers linked to breast cancer, better understand climate change or figure out how to combat hospital infections.

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Law
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Yale Law Students Raise Case For Discharged Vets

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In the U.S., posttraumatic stress disorder or PTSD has become part of our national vocabulary. During the Vietnam War, though, it wasn't yet a medical diagnosis, nor was it accepted as an explanation for erratic behavior. Today, a number of Vietnam veterans filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of the tens of thousands of Vietnam vets they say got kicked out of the military because of problems related to PTSD.

NPR's Quil Lawrence reports their suit aims to get these veterans the benefits they missed out on for decades.

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NPR Story
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

For Obama In Ukraine, Tools Are Symbolic Or Economic

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

President Obama may have "all options" on the table, but in practice, his available tools are limited. Military action is all but unthinkable, while economic measures may have unintended effects.

Politics
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

In Tight Texas Lt. Gov. Race, Little Space Left On The Right

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

There's been a lot of talk lately about Democrats' plan to turn Texas blue. But it is at the moment an exercise in optimism. To understand just how conservative much of the state is, look no further than the Republican primary for lieutenant governor. The incumbent, veteran powerbroker David Dewhurst, is running against three strong challengers.

And as NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports, all four candidates have been racing each other to the right.

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Around the Nation
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

As Calendar Flips To March, People Grow Sick Of The Snow

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The latest in a series of nasty winter storms socked the nation today. It rolled north through the mid-Atlantic this morning, right up the East Coast bringing freezing rain, heavy snow and plummeting temperatures. More than 2,900 flights were cancelled today and more than 7,100 were delayed. The federal government and many schools and offices also shut down.

NPR's Allison Keyes reports, for many in the nation's capital, spring can't come fast enough.

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Religion
4:29 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Roadside Service: Drive-In Church Brings God To Your Car

Sun, surf and sermons: At the Daytona Beach Drive In Christian Church in Florida, parishioners attend services by parking their cars in a grassy lot.
Amy Kiley WMFE

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:19 pm

When most people drive to church on Sunday, it's to sit for an hour-long service on uncomfortable wooden pews. Not at the Daytona Beach Drive In Christian Church in Florida.

As church attendance continues to decline in the United States, some parishes are doing what they can to draw congregants: embracing social media, loosening dress codes and even altering service times for big sporting events. At this church, people park in rows on the grass facing an altar on the balcony of an old drive-in theater. To hear the service, they switch on their radios.

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It's All Politics
3:43 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Ukraine Is The Latest Overseas Crisis To Blur DC's Partisan Lines

Though some conservatives said President Obama's alleged weakness led to Russian President Vladimir Putin's Ukraine invasion, reaction didn't follow the usual partisan lines.
Mikhail Klimentyev AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 4:03 pm

To the list of political issues with which we began this mid-term election year, which had the Affordable Care Act and the economy at the top, we can now add Russia's involvement in Ukraine.

But while the domestic issues divide along fairly clear blue and red lines, the political question of what the U.S. should do about Russian President Vladimir Putin's deployment of the Russian military into Ukraine's Crimea is scrambling Washington's normal partisan lines.

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The Two-Way
3:43 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Supreme Court Refuses To Revisit Case On Anti-Immigrant Laws

Former Marine Sgt. Salvadaor Parada, right, speaks to protesters during a rally outside city hall in Farmers Branch, Texas in 2006.
Rex C. Curry AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 4:01 pm

A long-running case with great symbolism for the immigration debate in the country has likely come to an end today: The Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal from a Dallas suburb over its stringent laws against illegal immigrants.

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Monkey See
3:07 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Book Club Meeting: Come Talk About Steinbeck's 'Grapes Of Wrath'

The Grapes Of Wrath opens in Dust Bowl Oklahoma.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 4:44 pm

Late last week, an email exchange between NPR Books' team members went something like this:

Camila: OH MY GOD PIGS EAT BABIES!?!?

Nicole: YUP. But then, later, people eat pigs. So, does that make them even?

Colin: I trust this isn't a spoiler. Ahem.

Tanya: SPOILERS PEOPLE.

Camila: Not a spoiler cus it's NOT EVEN A BIG DEAL. That's the worst part. It's just like "Oh yeah, remember the time that pig ate that baby? Memories."

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Parallels
2:50 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

My (Brief) Detention By Iran's Morality Police

A woman adjusts her scarf after seeing the morality police in a cafe during a crackdown on "social corruption" in Iran's capital Tehran in 2008.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 10:24 am

On my third day in Tehran last week, I was detained by Iran's notorious "morals police." This volunteer corps, with a presence in nearly every city and town, polices infractions against Islamic values. These guardians patrol parks, recreation centers, shopping malls and cafes where young people gather.

My introduction to the morality squad began with shouts and threats and ended with fruit juice and a hug from a lady cop in a black chador that covered bleached blond hair and a snug red leather jacket.

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Shots - Health News
2:49 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Dunk Now, Pay Later: Elite College Players May Suffer In Middle Age

Duke's Jabari Parker weaves his way through UCLA players during a December game in New York.
Jason DeCrow AP

College athletes astound us with their power and speed, but they can pay a price years later. Division I players are more likely to be disabled, depressed and in pain in middle age, a study finds. And they may end up worse off because they fail to make the switch from high-level competition to the low-level activity of the rest of us.

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The Salt
2:38 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

The Secret Lives Of Cows: Jumping For Joy

Not quite jumping over the moon but ... : An animal named Luna (get it?) jumps over an obstacle with rider Regina Mayer on her back in the Bavarian town of Traunstein, in southern Germany.
Michael Hudelist AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 11:26 am

Ah, cows. They're big, lumbering, earthbound beasts, right? But sometimes, Bessie and pals just have to get airborne.

That gif of dairy cows "jumping for joy" is from a video that's been making the rounds on the Internet. We spotted it last week when food journalist Michael Pollan tweeted it out:

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Parallels
2:19 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

From Weapons To Fashion, Crimea's Indelible Mark On History

A balaclava-clad protester shouts anti-government slogans during a rally in Honduras.
Orlando Sierra AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:14 am

For history nerds, it's fascinating to see the word "Crimea" back in the news. The last time this peninsula on the Black Sea dominated world headlines was nearly 160 years ago. (Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin met there at the town of Yalta in 1945, but that wasn't really about the region.)

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

U.S., EU Threaten Russia With Sanctions Over Ukraine

President Obama answers a question regarding the ongoing situation in the Ukraine, during his meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 8:28 pm

(We updated this post at 8:28 p.m. ET.)

The United States and the European Union are threatening Moscow with sanctions over Russia's move to dispatch troops into Ukrainian territory.

During short remarks at the Oval Office, President Obama said the U.S. was examining a wide array of steps that include putting "economic and diplomatic" pressure on Russia.

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The Salt
2:00 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Shamrock Shake

Michelle Obama says you should get at least five servings of green per day.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 3:48 pm

Long ago, McDonald's chose to honor St. Patrick banishing the snakes from Ireland with its Shamrock Shake, made with real snake. It was known for its subtle flavor and powerful aphrodisiac qualities. While the recipe has changed slightly over the years, the powerful aphrodisiac qualities remain.

Peter: Sucking this up through the straw is pretty hard work just to get something that tastes like toothpaste.

Miles: Shamrocks are good luck, but I think the woman who rang us up took it too far when she said, "You're gonna need it."

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Author Interviews
1:04 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

During World War II, Even Filmmakers Reported For Duty

Maj. Frank Capra sits at his War Department desk in Washington on March 6, 1942. Capra's non-War Department films include It's A Wonderful Life and Mr. Smith Goes To Washington.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 1:35 pm

When America entered World War II, some of Hollywood's most celebrated directors enlisted and risked their lives. But they weren't fighting — they were filming combat.

Through the 1930s, Hollywood and the federal government held a mutual suspicion of each other. But after Pearl Harbor, the War Department asked Hollywood directors to make short documentaries that could be presented in theaters before the featured films. The ideas was to show Americans what was at stake, give them a glimpse of what our soldiers were going through and stir up patriotic feelings.

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