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12:04 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Disgust Or Pity For Crack-Smoking Toronto Mayor?

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 2:47 pm

Finally today, not to kick a man when he is already down, but can we take a moment to contemplate yesterday's admission by the mayor of a major North American city that he had in fact used crack cocaine? Citizens of Toronto, welcome to my world. As a longtime resident of Washington, D.C., I have had to endure years of jokes about our former mayor, Marion Barry, now a D.C. council member, who was famously induced to light up in a hotel room by a woman with whom he had been, ahem, involved.

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Shots - Health News
12:03 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

A New Look At An Old Epilepsy Drug Yields Treatment Clue

In epilepsy, the normal behavior of brain neurons is disturbed. The drug valproic acid appears to help the brain replenish a key chemical, preventing seizures.
David Mack/Science Source

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 4:38 pm

About one-third of people with epilepsy aren't helped by existing drugs.

But a commonly prescribed medicine used for almost 50 years to treat the disorder has revealed new information about how the disorder works that could lead to improvements in treatments.

That drug, valproic acid, is used to treat epilepsy, migraines and bipolar disorder. It's the active ingredient in drugs like as Depakote or Depakon, among other names.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:58 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Should Anyone Be Able To Take A Job Anywhere?

Kathleen Newland and Ron Unz argued against the motion "Let Anyone Take A Job Anywhere" in an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate on Oct. 30.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 3:22 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

In a global economy, does it make sense to allow workers to move freely?

Letting people go where the jobs are would improve the lives of millions around the world, some argue. But others say an influx of labor into the richest countries would devalue workers' worth and actually hurt more in the long run.

A group of experts recently took on this question in an Oxford-style debate for Intelligence Squared U.S. They faced off two against two on the motion "Let Anyone Take A Job Anywhere."

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The Thistle & Shamrock
11:47 am
Wed November 6, 2013

The Thistle And Shamrock: Brian McNeill At Swannanoa

Brian McNeill.
Courtesy of the artist

Join Fiona Ritchie at the Swannanoa Gathering in the mountains of North Carolina for a conversational, musical encounter with multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and singer Brian McNeill. The musician chats about his globetrotting years with Battlefield Band, his song and novel writing, and his projects uncovering Scottish connections in North America and Europe. His travels always inspire new music, and McNeill shares songs and tunes with the audience.

The Two-Way
11:32 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Splattered Flag-Themed Football Uniforms Have Many Seeing Red

Part of the special design to be worn by Northwestern University football players on Nov. 16.
Facebook.com/UnderArmourFootball

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 2:01 pm

Special uniforms that Northwestern University's football team will wear on Nov. 16 have sparked controversy because of red streaks across the flag-themed patterns that look like blood to many observers.

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Parallels
11:09 am
Wed November 6, 2013

World Headlines: Israel's Avigdor Lieberman Acquitted Of Fraud

Israel Haaretz

Israel's Foreign Ministser Avigdor Lieberman, one of the country's most prominent and polarizing political figures, was acquitted of fraud charges on Wednesday in a closely watched case.

Lieberman, who is known for his hard-line policies against the Palestinians and Arab countries, is now expected to return to the job from which he resigned a year ago while the case was working its way through the courts.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:06 am
Wed November 6, 2013

A Darker Universe

the Chandra mission." href="/post/darker-universe" class="noexit lightbox">
The hunt for dark matter started with astronomer Fritz Zwicky's observations of the Coma galaxy cluster in the 1930s. This recent image of the Coma cluster combines optical and X-ray observations from the Chandra mission.
J.Sanders et al NASA/CXC/MPE/SDSS

"What is essential is invisible to the eye," said the Fox to the Little Prince. And although in Saint-Exupéry's fable the "invisible" referred to love, the Fox was also right on when it comes to about 95 percent of the universe.

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Live in Concert
11:01 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Poliça, Live In Concert

Polica, performing live at the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C.
NPR Music

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 1:27 pm

Electro-pop band Poliça is known for its memorable live performances, propelled by the alluring voice and moves of lead singer Channy Leaneagh, not to mention two drummers with full kits. The group broke out of the Minneapolis music scene just a year ago with its 2012 debut, Give You The Ghost, a heady mix of beauty and power.

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It's All Politics
10:49 am
Wed November 6, 2013

7 Election Lessons We Should Have Seen Coming

Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, appearing with his family, waves goodbye to supporters after conceding the Virginia governor's race to Terry McAuliffe. Cuccinelli's stronger-than-expected run became the dominant story on Election Night.
Win McNamee Getty Images

In the end, they pretty much all won. The people who were expected to prevail Tuesday night wound up in the winner's circle. In New Jersey and New York, of course, and in Virginia, too, in the end. The ballot measures also went according to script.

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Shots - Health News
10:48 am
Wed November 6, 2013

How Pictures Of Infant Boy's Eyes Helped Diagnose Cancer

A milky eye can be a sign of early cancer of the retina.
Courtesy of Bryan Shaw

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 9:51 pm

Bryan Shaw never expected to write a research paper about a rare eye cancer.

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Parallels
10:28 am
Wed November 6, 2013

In Violent Hospitals, China's Doctors Can Become Patients

People wait in line at a counter for medical services at the Guanganmen Chinese medicine hospital in Beijing.
David Gray Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 8:45 pm

Several hundred doctors and nurses jammed the courtyard of the No. 1 People's Hospital in Wenling, a city with a population of about 1 million in Zhejiang province, a four-hour train ride south of Shanghai.

They wore surgical masks to hide their identities from the government and waved white signs that read, "Zero tolerance for violence."

"Doctors and nurses must be safe to take care of people's health!" video shows them chanting.

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It's All Politics
9:54 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Wednesday Political Mix: Post-Vote Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 12:19 pm

Don't you love Election Day morning-afters?

The musings. The what-it-means. The grasping what-ifs.

The exit polls.

The blame.

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Monkey See
9:50 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Miss Universe's National Costume Show Raids International Feather Supply

This photo of Brenda Gonzalez, Miss Argentina, is my prototype national costume. If you grew up wanting to be Miss Universe, this is why. Feathers, metallic bustier: this is it.
Darren Decker Miss Universe Organization

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 10:33 am

Two years back, we noted that Miss USA's costume at the Miss Universe National Costume Show was a mashup of tradition and vulgarity: "like crossing the Delaware to go to Hooters."

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The Two-Way
9:31 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Astrodoomed? Famed Houston Stadium May Fall To Wrecking Ball

An interior shot of the Houston Astrodome taken in 1990. The stadium was "the first fully air-conditioned, enclosed, domed, multipurpose sports stadium in the world," according to the Texas Historical Association.
Tony Duffy Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 1:46 pm

Voters in Houston on Tuesday rejected a bond referendum that would have allowed Harris County, Texas, to borrow $217 million that it could then spend on turning the Astrodome into one very large convention and exhibition hall.

The vote was 53 percent against the referendum, to 47 percent in favor.

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Shots - Health News
9:17 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Administration Looks To Give Labor Unions Health Tax Relief

Union member Tom Stensberg holds a sign thanking Congress for the Affordable Care Act during a rally hosted by the AFL-CIO at the U.S. Capitol in May 2010.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Weeks after denying labor's request to give union members access to health law subsidies, the Obama administration is signaling it intends to exempt some union plans from one of the law's substantial taxes.

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All Tech Considered
8:18 am
Wed November 6, 2013

The Tech Team Podcast, Episode 1: Kids And Technology

Tech correspondents Laura Sydell and Steve Henn recording the first episode of our tech team podcast in a garage in Silicon Valley. (Naturally.)
Cindy Carpien NPR

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 10:02 am

As loyal readers and listeners know, your NPR tech reporters are organizing our enterprise reporting by exploring a single theme in technology over the course of a week. Our first theme week was on kids and technology and it aired last week. We featured stories about babies and screen time, teens and social media, the science behind video games and more.

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The Two-Way
8:11 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Top Stories: Election Results; Hagel On Defense Costs

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 8:59 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Your Election News In Five Headlines.

-- Soaring Personnel Costs Threaten Readiness, Hagel Warns.

And here are more early headlines:

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Soaring Personnel Costs Threaten Readiness, Hagel Warns

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 8:57 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel talks with NPR's Steve Inskeep

Health care and retirement costs that already account for a large part of the U.S. military's budget and are on a path to go even higher could leave the nation with "a military that's heavily compensated, but probably a force that's not capable and not ready," Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel tells NPR.

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Your Election News In Five Headlines

Democrat Terry McAuliffe, who won a close election Tuesday to become Virginia's next governor, hugged wife Dorothy at the campaign's victory celebration in Tysons Corner, Va.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 10:57 am

  • From the NPR Newscast: A roundup of election results

Here's a cheat sheet about Tuesday's elections, starting with the most surprising news:

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The Two-Way
7:14 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Book News: Lynn Coady Takes Canada's Top Literary Honor

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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