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7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Hacking Trial Puts U.K. Press, Politicos, Police On Defense

Former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks has pleaded not guilty to five charges related to the phone hacking scandal.
Sang Tan AP

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Journalists who were once among the most powerful in the United Kingdom go on trial in London on Monday. The trial is the result of a 2011 hacking scandal that electrified the media on both sides of the Atlantic and sank Rupert Murdoch's News of the World.

The trial is expected to reveal details of the uncomfortably cozy relationship between the media and political elites, says former Murdoch executive Ken Chandler.

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Parallels
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

American's Death Still A Greek Mystery, 65 Years Later

CBS correspondent George Polk and his wife, Rea, in 1948, shortly before his murder on May 8 of that year in Greece.
Megaloeconomou AP

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

George Polk may have been born to make history. He was descended from the American president who led the conquest of Texas and much of the Southwest. But for George Polk, Texas was too small, says his brother William.

In the 1930s, "Texas was a little backwater at the time, and very few people even knew where other countries were — what the names were, what the languages were that were spoken," William Polk says. "And he had a tremendous sense of curiosity."

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

A Ghost Story Between Brothers

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If the puzzle has your head spinning, how about a ghost story? Glynn Washington, host of the storytelling radio show "Snap Judgment," has a tale just in time for Halloween.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GLYNN WASHINGTON: OK. So it was one night in Detroit. I was five years old asleep in the bed right next to my brother. In the middle of the night, he woke me up and asked me: What's that? I looked up and staring down from the ceiling was a child's face.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Does A Bear Drive In The Woods?

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, to a question you have probably never asked yourself: How do you get a bear out of a parked car? And more to the point, how does it get in there in the first place? In the Northern California town of Truckee, three different bears broke into three different cars over the past few weeks. It is a true story. Anne Bryant is the executive director of the Bear League in Tahoe, California. It's a not-for-profit volunteer group set up to help keep bears safe in the wild. She joins us now on the line. Hi, Anne.

ANNE BRYANT: Hi, Rachel.

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Is Rebuilding Storm-Struck Coastlines Worth The Cost?

The Long Beach High School marching band prepares to march down the Long Beach boardwalk during a ribbon-cutting ceremony Friday.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

One year ago Tuesday, Hurricane Sandy bore down on the East Coast, devastating shoreline communities from Florida to Maine.

Many of these areas have been rebuilt, including the Long Beach boardwalk, about 30 miles outside New York City. Officials held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new boardwalk Friday.

Ninety percent of the funding for the restoration came from the federal government. The Federal Emergency Management Agency paid $44 million to repair the devastation.

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Movie Interviews
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Song For Childhood Ghosts 'Carries On' The Sorrow

Singer-songwriter Rita Hosking grew up in a house she says was haunted. She even saw the ghosts of a mother and her son, she says.
Rik Keller Photography

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Weekend Edition has been asking you to share your scary stories, the ones that have become family lore. This week, we're sharing those stories and delving into how and why they affect us.

Singer-songwriter Rita Hosking grew up in a house that was haunted. It was known as the Old Erickson Place on Hatchet Mountain in California. In her 2009 album Come Sunrise, she tells the tragic story of the woman and her little boy who lived there years before.

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

The Truth That Creeps Beneath Our Spooky Ghost Stories

We asked you to send us your scary stories, then we told them to an anthropologist.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Weekend Edition has been asking you to share your scary stories, the ones that have become family lore. This week, we're sharing those stories and delving into how and why they affect us.

As a teenager, Kevin Burns babysat for his sister's daughters — a 6-year-old and a 9-year-old. Throughout the night, he heard a baby crying, but it wasn't the kids, who were sound asleep in their beds.

Each time he investigated the crying, it stopped. When his sister and her husband came home, he asked them if their neighbor had a baby who cried loudly.

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Author Interviews
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

River Phoenix's Eccentric Upbringing, Tragic Death

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The 1980s and early '90s produced a generation of talented male actors known for taking on complicated, sometimes even controversial roles. Johnny Depp, Brad Pitt, Ethan Hawke - they all went on to become huge stars. But the legend of one member of that generation stands out, despite his early death - River Phoenix. Here he is in a 1986 classic "Stand By Me."

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STAND BY ME")

WIL WEATON: (As Gordie) You want to be the Lone Ranger and the Cisco Kid - walk and talk and - Jesus, where'd you get this?

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Religion
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Accusations Of Coverups Roil Minnesota Archdiocese

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now comes the kind of story George Polk would have pursued, sexual abuse within the Catholic Church. And indeed, several Boston newspapers won a Polk Award for their reporting on the subject back in 2003.

Recently, the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis was rocked by revelations of abuse. A former official says church leaders covered up numerous cases of sexual misconduct by priests and even made special payments to known pedophiles, this in archdiocese that claimed to be a national leader in dealing with the issue.

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Digital Life
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

'Sockpuppets' Lurking On Wikipedia

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Chances are if you want to look something up, you've first Googled it and then you've read about whatever it is on Wikipedia. But as with a lot of things on the Internet, how do you know that you can trust what you're reading? That's a question that occupies a lot of time for the people at the Wikimedia Foundation, which is the not-for-profit organization that operates the online encyclopedia.

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Sports
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Obstruction Call Gives Cardinals A World Series Lead

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The St. Louis Cardinals and the Boston Red Sox take the field again tonight for game 4 of the World Series. The two teams are going to be hard-pressed to match the emotion and the drama, not to mention the confusion, of last night's game 3. The Cardinals won 5-to-4 on a rare call by the umpires. NPR's Tom Goldman has this report from St. Louis.

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Europe
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

'Just For Fun,' Lively Song And Dance In Kiev Metro Station

Ukrainians sing and dance in a subway in downtown Kiev in 2009. It has been a tradition for 20 years.
Efrem Lukatsky AP

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 5:17 pm

The best thing about traveling is that some experiences just crop up spontaneously.

Take a recent Saturday evening in Kiev, the capital of Ukraine.

It's chilly, and people hurry past on their way to clubs and restaurants, their coat collars turned up against the wind.

Young women clatter up the steps from the Teatralna metro station, oblivious to the sound that wafts up behind them — the sound of people singing.

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Middle East
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Syria's Chemicals May Have To Be Moved To Be Destroyed

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 5:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Syria met an important deadline today. The government submitted plans for the destruction of its chemical weapons. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has said that it hopes Syria's entire chemical arsenal can be destroyed by the middle of next year. But that may be an ambitious target. Joining us to discuss all of this is NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel. Thanks so much for being with us, Geoff.

GEOFF BRUMFIEL, BYLINE: Hi, Rachel.

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Middle East
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Saudi Women Hold A Drive-In Protest

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. We begin today in Saudi Arabia where women activists say they are one step closer to overturning that country's driving ban. More than 40 women defied the ban yesterday, despite warnings from the government and conservative clerics. NPR's Deborah Amos has the story from Riyadh.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Foreign language spoken)

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The Sunday Conversation
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Ghostwriter Carries On V.C. Andrews' Gothic Legacy

Andrew Neiderman has written more than 40 novels in his own name, in addition to dozens as V.C. Andrews.
Courtesy of Andrew Neiderman

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

For 26 years, Andrew Neiderman has been ghostwriting for Virginia Andrews — also known as V.C. Andrews, author of the bestselling novel, Flowers in the Attic. Under his watch, Andrews' name and gothic style of storytelling have spread to 95 countries in dozens of languages.

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My Guilty Pleasure
7:03 am
Sun October 27, 2013

You Came, You Saw, You Did WHAT?: A Ribald Roman History

Timur Kulgarin iStockphoto.com

ADVISORY: This essay contains violent and sexual content that some readers may find offensive.

Dirt for days. Around-the-clock degradation. Scandal too good to be true. Is this the latest from a publishing porn princess or prince? No: this lip-smacking low behavior is from Suetonius' Lives of the Caesars.

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Music Interviews
6:35 am
Sun October 27, 2013

From 'Crouching Tiger' To 'Secret Songs': Composer Tan Dun's Next Move

Chinese composer Tan Dun's latest work, Nu-Shu: The Secret Songs of Women, was inspred by an ancient language spoken in a remote area of Tan's home province of Hunan.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 1:24 pm

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Code Switch
6:01 am
Sun October 27, 2013

N.Y. Chinatown Family Finds Roots In Early Chinese Cinema

Harold Lee's son Henry, perched on the roof of a camera truck, helped produce and import Chinese-language films from Hong Kong and China in the late 1940s.
Courtesy of the Lee Family

Douglas Lee thought he knew just about everything about the family business.

Since the late 1930s, the Lee family has sold insurance at 31 Pell Street in New York City's Chinatown. Their entrepreneurial roots in the Chinese-American community stretch back to 1888, when the Lees opened a grocery store at the same location.

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The Salt
5:56 am
Sun October 27, 2013

A Sweet And Sour History Of Our Obsession With Candy

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 10:47 am

Trick-or-treaters demand it. Dentists despise it. Pop musicians have sung odes to it.

Love it or hate it, candy is a cultural fixation — and it isn't going anywhere.

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Books News & Features
5:48 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Energetic, Intimate 'Letters' Reveal Private Leonard Bernstein

Composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein, shown here conducting the New York Philharmonic orchestra in 1963, was a legend in American music. Letters to and from Bernstein have been compiled into The Leonard Bernstein Letters, a new book edited by Nigel Simeone.
Express Newspapers Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Leonard Bernstein was a singular American genius. One of the great orchestra conductors of the 20th Century, he was also a composer of hit musicals like West Side Story, as well as symphonies and ballets. He was a teacher and television personality — his Young People's Concerts introduced generations of children to classical music.

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