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The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Two Bangladeshi Expatriates Sentenced To Death Over War Crimes

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 4:11 pm

Two prominent Bangladeshi expats — one a Muslim leader in the U.K. and the other a U.S. citizen — have been sentenced to death for war crimes committed during the country's fight for independence in 1971.

The BBC reports:

"UK-Bangladeshi Muslim community leader Chowdhury Mueen Uddin and Ashrafuzzaman Khanwas were being tried in absentia by a special tribunal in Bangladesh.

"They were found guilty on 11 charges relating to the abduction and killing of 18 independence supporters."

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All Tech Considered
12:42 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

If The Internet Is Your Canvas, You Paint In Zeros And Ones

Ifnoyes.com sold at an art auction in New York for $3,500. The artist, Rafael Rozendaal, compares owning a website to owning a public sculpture in a park." href="/post/if-internet-your-canvas-you-paint-zeros-and-ones" class="noexit lightbox">
Ifnoyes.com sold at an art auction in New York for $3,500. The artist, Rafael Rozendaal, compares owning a website to owning a public sculpture in a park.
Rafael Rozendaal

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 11:56 am

That Benjamin Palmer dropped $3,500 at Phillips auction house in New York is not surprising. The 217-year-old company, headquartered on Park Avenue, regularly sells artwork for tens — and often hundreds — of thousands of dollars.

What is surprising, however, is that he took nothing home. He has nothing to put up on his wall or put on a pedestal in his living room. Physically, his acquisition lies among a hub of wires, and the likelihood is he will never touch it. But it lives virtually inside every computer, smartphone or tablet in the world.

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It's All Politics
11:01 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Va. Governor's Race: Nationally Significant Or Just Nasty?

Virginia gubernatorial candidates Democrat Terry McAuliffe (left) and Republican Ken Cuccinelli.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 10:30 am

Virginians go to the polls Tuesday to pick the man they dislike the least to be their new governor: long-time Clinton moneyman Terry McAuliffe or hardline Tea Party conservative Ken Cuccinelli.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Sun November 3, 2013

WATCH: Nebraska's Unbelievable Hail Mary To Beat Northwestern

Nebraska wide receiver Jordan Westerkamp catches the game winning touchdown.
Nati Harnik AP

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Kenyans Mutai, Jeptoo Win New York City Marathon

Runners cross the Verrazano Bridge as they race in the New York City Marathon on Sunday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 2:52 pm

This Post Was Last Updated At 12:06 p.m. ET.

Two Kenyans running similarly tactical races came from behind to win the New York City Marathon on Sunday, marking the third time Kenyans have won both the men's and women's 26.2-mile road race.

Geoffrey Mutai, of Kenya, stayed pretty quiet for the first 20 miles. He nestled in the pack, shielding himself from the wind, then, as the toughest part of the race began, he accelerated past the pack and never looked back, winning the race in 2:08:24.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Kerry In Egypt For First Time Since Morsi's Ouster

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Egyptian Foreign Affairs Minister Nabil Fahmy ahead of their press conference on Sunday in Cairo.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 2:39 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Egypt this morning, marking the highest level visit by a U.S. diplomat since the military ousted President Hosni Mubarak in July.

The visit also comes at a time when relations between the two countries are frayed. Reporting from Cairo, NPR's Leila Fadel sent this report to our Newscast unit:

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Sunday Puzzle
8:05 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Regardless Of The Answer, Stay Staid

NPR

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

On-air challenge: Each answer is a two-word phrase consisting of two homophones starting with the letter S. For example, given the clue "remained dignified," the answer would be, "stayed staid."

Last week's challenge: Name a brand of beer. Rearrange the letters to name an activity often associated with beer.

Answer: Tsingtao, toasting

Winner: Jacob Taber of New York, N.Y.

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Africa
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Morsi Trial May Reignite Anger, Violence In Egypt

An Egyptian woman holds a portrait of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi during a protest in Nasr City in Cairo on Friday.
Manu Brabo AP

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:40 pm

Egypt's first-ever democratically elected president goes on trial in Cairo on Monday, charged with inciting violence and complicity in the deaths of protesters.

Mohammed Morsi has been detained at an unknown facility since the military ousted him from power last July. His trial is likely to fan the flames of Egypt's ongoing political crisis

The last time Morsi's supporters saw him was on July 2. The former president was delivering a defiant speech as hundreds of thousands of his opponents rallied in Cairo and other cities, demanding his removal.

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Photography
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

What Happens When You Touch A Stranger

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Religion
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Giving Counsel For The President's Soul

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Every day, President Obama gets a daily brief, a confidential package of intelligence information. For the last six years, he has also been receiving something more like a morning devotional, which includes scripture, poetry and prayer. Joshua Dubois sends those inspirational notes. He's the former head of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, and he's also the author of a new book called "The President's Devotional." Joshua Dubois joins us in here in our Washington studios. Thanks for being here.

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Around the Nation
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Paul Theroux Aims To Go Off The Beaten Southern Path

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For nearly 40 years, Paul Theroux has taken his readers to many corners of the world, from Cairo to Cape Town, London to Japan, Boston to Argentina. So it may be surprising that this novelist has yet to write about the American South. That is about to change.

PAUL THEROUX: I got in my car a year ago and went down South - South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi - then I went back, back to Alabama, back to Mississippi. I've made now five trips to the South.

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Politics
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

McAuliffe Holds Lead In Va. Governor Contest

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Tuesday's election is seen as a key off-year contest, and a test of strength for both parties leading up to the 2014 elections. But it's beginning to look like a rout. Democrat Terry McAuliffe is leading Republican Ken Cuccinelli by as much as 12 points. The race appears to have turned into a referendum on Cuccinelli's conservative views.

Middle East
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

U.S. Drone Strike Rankles Pakistani Government

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

The Pakistani Taliban was forced to name a new leader after its chief, Hakimullah Mehsud, was killed in a U.S. drone attack on Friday. The Pakistani government called the strike "counter-productive" to peace and stability. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Harris Khalique, a columnist for the Pakistani newspaper The News International.

NPR Story
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Putting Bro Hugs In The Crossword

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we definitely don't make the make this mistake here at WEEKEND EDITION, but there are those who think that crossword puzzles appeal to a mostly older crowd. Perhaps it's the dated clues and the obscure language.

But Hans Anderson says there is a new crop of young puzzle-makers who are pushing to make crosswords more contemporary. And they aren't worried if some of the answers might not be appropriate at the breakfast table.

(SOUNDBITE OF RUSTLING PAPER)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Sure.

BEN TAUSIG: Yeah, leave it up.

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Television
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Knitting In Real Time Is Just Right For Norway's Slow TV

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Can A World Series Win Help Boston's Healing?

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Well, if you didn't see it live, you've probably heard it 100 times from all of the displaced Bostonians in your life - the Red Sox won the World Series last week. NPR's Mike Pesca was in Boston for the Series. He joins us now to talk about what the game did and didn't achieve for the great city of Boston. Good morning, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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Health Care
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Some Amish Opt Out Of Government-Sponsored Insurance

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, to Indiana, where members of the Amish community are trying to figure out what the Affordable Care Act means for them, specifically the law's requirement that every person have health insurance. The Amish are religiously opposed to commercial insurance and they pride themselves on taking care of their own. Here's Dennis Lehman. He is the president of an Amish community health clinic in Topeka, Indiana.

DENNIS LEHMAN: We've always shared each other's burdens, so to speak. We help each other with free-will donations.

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Law
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Listeners Share Stories Of Profiling

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

New York is the current flashpoint in the debate over racial profiling, but there are few places in America where race isn't an issue.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: We asked our listeners to share some of their experiences. Here are a couple of those stories.

ADAM WALKER: My name is Adam Walker. I'm currently in Beaumont, Texas. I'm born from a black mother and a white father.

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The Sunday Conversation
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

Racial Profiling A Lifelong Reality For Ta-Nehisi Coates

The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood, about growing up in West Baltimore." href="/post/sunday-convo-racial-profiling" class="noexit lightbox">
Ta-Nehisi Coates is the author of The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood, about growing up in West Baltimore.
Liz Lynch

Originally published on Sun November 3, 2013 12:18 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Ta-Nehisi Coates grew up in Baltimore, and it was there, as a teenager, when he first felt like he was being singled out for his race. He and a friend walked into a store, and the employees followed them the entire time as they shopped.

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Law
7:11 am
Sun November 3, 2013

N.Y. Stop-And-Frisk Reforms On Hold For New Year, New Mayor

New York police officers walk through a Brooklyn housing development in August.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:45 pm

In New York City, the country's largest police force has been involved in a high-profile legal battle over its stop-and-frisk policy.

Few policies of outgoing New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg have been as controversial as stop-and-frisk, the tactic New York police use to stop people on the streets without a search warrant.

The police department says it's been vital in catching criminals and reducing the city's crime rate.

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