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The Record
8:14 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Where Rock The Bells Fails, Drake's Tour Succeeds

Drake backlit at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Monday night.
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 4:18 pm

What does the concert-ticket buyer want? If we're accepting that the market for albums — physical and digital — won't ever rebound, that digital singles will never make up for the loss in revenue and that streaming can't be profitable under current licensing laws, professional musicians (and the labels that love them) need to figure this out. Rap music, with its younger audience, has been more flexible in this regard than other genres: Rap acts now run the multi-genre summer festival gamut after infiltrating smaller cities' club circuits long ago.

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It's All Politics
7:40 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Wednesday Political Mix: Obama's 'Read My Lips' ACA Problem

President Obama would like you to remember that Obamacare was based on Massachusetts legislation signed in 2006 by then governor and Republican Mitt Romney, pictured at the signing ceremony. And that rollout started slowly, too.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 11:40 am

Good morning, fellow political junkies.

The Affordable Care Act should dominate Wednesday's news cycle thanks to scheduled high-profile appearances by President Obama and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to defend the law.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Book News: Amazon's Kindle MatchBook Is Out — Will Publishers Opt In?

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos unveils new Kindle reading devices during a 2012 news conference.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 10:25 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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All Tech Considered
7:03 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Weekly Innovation: A Light Bulb That's Also A Flashlight

When charged, the Bulb Flashlight can stay on for three hours.
Courtesy of the MoMA Store

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 9:48 am

Each week, we highlight a design or product innovation that you might not have heard about yet. Many of them come through your submissions (here's the form), but this week's idea came to us from our NPR Two-Way blogger, Eyder Peralta, who thought this was pretty cool. We did, too.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Medical Magic Leads To Terror In 'Parasite'

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 2:37 pm

Welcome to SymboGen, your friendly neighborhood medical company; have you stopped by for your tapeworm implant? Fair warning: There have been some unusual side effects ...

Health care has swallowed American headlines in recent years; besides the arguments over who deserves treatment to begin with, issues are emerging in pharmaceutical brand ethics, anti-vaccination activism, and the overuse of antibiotics. The war against disease is spreading against the smallest enemies of all.

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Sebelius: 'Hold Me Accountable For The Debacle'

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius as she was sworn in prior to the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing Wednesday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 4:28 pm

  • Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., and Secretary Sebelius on who's responsible for 'this debacle'

(We last added to this post at 4:10 p.m. ET.)

"You deserve better. ... I apologize. ... I'm accountable to you."

That's what Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told Americans on Wednesday morning during a Congressional hearing into problems with the Obama administration's HealthCare.gov website and Republicans' concerns about the Affordable Care Act.

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Around the Nation
6:15 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Will GPS Cannon Spell The End Of High-Speed Chases?

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Police cars in Iowa and Florida are testing a secret weapon: a small cannon embedded in the grille. It shoots tracking bullets containing tiny GPS devices that can stick to the trunk of a suspect's car. Police could then follow a suspect at a leisurely pace instead of embarking on a dangerous high-speed chase. The weapon, very James Bond, except American police would need to get a warrant before attaching a GPS to a car. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores Play The Print Card Against Amazon

Barnes & Noble is one of several stores that have refused to carry Amazon Publishing's books.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

When it comes to book publishing, all we ever seem to hear about is online sales, the growth of e-books and the latest version of a digital book reader. But the fact is, only 20 percent of the book market is e-books; it's still dominated by print. And a recent standoff in the book business shows how good old-fashioned, brick-and-mortar bookstores are still trying to wield their influence in the industry. You might even call it brick-and-mortar booksellers' revenge.

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NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Without Earmark 'Grease,' Some Say, Spending Bills Get Stuck

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

While Congress tries to get to the bottom of what went wrong with the Affordable Care Act website, it's got other problems on its mind. Leading the list is the inability of lawmakers to carry out their most fundamental constitutional responsibility: appropriating the money needed to run the government in a timely fashion.

This month's shutdown was only the most recent fallout of the breakdown in appropriations. Some lawmakers say the Republican ban on earmarks nearly three years ago has only made things worse.

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NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Lawmakers To Grill Sebelius On Affordable Care Act

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. More hearings come today on the messy rollout of the Affordable Care Act. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius will face questions from the House, Energy and Commerce Committee. Now, yesterday, the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid testified before a different committee. Marilyn Tavenner offered consumers an apology for the problems at the health care.gov website.

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NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Voters To Weigh In On Fracking In Colorado

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Voters in communities in Ohio and Colorado will decide measures this coming Tuesday that would ban or limit the practice of hydraulic fracturing. Across the U.S., campaigns questioning the health and safety of fracking for natural gas are heating up. Grace Hood of member station KUNC reports on the effort in Fort Collins, Colorado.

GRACE HOOD, BYLINE: Most look forward to having some downtime over the weekend, but not Kelly Giddens.

(SOUNDBITE OF KNOCKING)

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NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

When Celebrity Retirements Don't Quite Stick

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And long time PBS news anchor Bill Moyers says his show will go off the air in January. His announcement yesterday sounded familiar to his fans because he's retired before. In fact, twice before.

BILL MOYERS: "The Journal" comes to an end with this broadcast.

MONTAGNE: That's the sound of Moyers' 2010 retirement, which didn't last.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Bill is back. "Moyers & Company."

MOYERS: Welcome. I'm glad we could get together again. It's good to be back.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Another View On How To Fix The Debt

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now let's hear an argument to worry more about the federal deficit.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Yesterday, former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers told us borrowing is not the nation's No. 1 problem. He'd rather invest in better roads or education.

LARRY SUMMERS: It's just as much a burden on future generations to defer maintenance as it is to pass on debt. It is just as much a burden on future generations to leave them undereducated in global competition as it is to pass on debt.

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NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Afghan Translator Credited With Saving Soldier Arrives In U.S.

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's get an update now on a story we brought you last month. An Army Captain named Matt Zeller waged a one-man campaign to get an American visa for his Afghan translator. A special program does allocate visas for Iraqis and Afghans who have put their lives in danger helping U.S. forces. In the eyes of some of their countrymen, they are tainted forever by their association with America.

Here's what Zeller's translator said about his situation.

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NPR Story
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Intelligence Officials Defend Spying On Allies

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Intelligence agencies are in the business of gathering information and forecasting where events may be going. In the case of the stream of revelations about U.S. spying, the agencies seem never to have seen it coming; they've often been on the defensive. But some of the latest documents leaked by Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor, prompted a strong U.S. response.

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Sports
5:48 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Feeling Really Lucky? Try Betting On The 76ers

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Anybody who bets on the Philadelphia 76ers to win the NBA title has a chance at a serious payoff. Pro basketball started yesterday. Miami is favored to win the championship. Philadelphia, coming off a disastrous last season, is not favored. In Las Vegas, odds against them are 9,999-to-1. Asked how they came up with that figure, odds-makers say it's just the highest number their computers can take.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Shots - Health News
5:03 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Violence, Chaos Let Polio Creep Back Into Syria And Horn Of Africa

The Ethiopian government has set up about a dozen vaccination booths along its thousand-mile border with Somalia.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 6:27 pm

Update on Thursday, Oct. 31, 6:30 p.m. ET:

A spokesman for the World Health Organization said Thursday that it was mistaken about the polio outbreak in Somalia spreading to South Sudan. The virus has been detected in Kenya and Ethiopia this year. But South Sudan has not recorded a polio case since 2009.

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Sweetness And Light
5:03 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Can NASCAR Steer Itself Back Into Popularity?

Sprint Cup Series driver Jimmie Johnson (48) and Juan Pablo Montoya (42) drive through turn four on a restart during the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Va.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

As the NASCAR season climaxes, America's prime motor sport continues to see its popularity in decline. For several years now, revenues and sponsorship have plummeted, leaving an audience that increasingly resembles the stereotype NASCAR so desperately thought it could grow beyond: older white Dixie working class.

Both ESPN and the Turner Broadcasting Co., longtime NASCAR networks, took a look at the down graphs and the down-scale demographics and didn't even bother to bid on the new TV contract.

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NPR Story
5:03 am
Wed October 30, 2013

California City Faces Off Against Hot Sauce Factory

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And that brings us to today's last word in business - which is spicy.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Asian chili garlic sauce, sriracha, is becoming more and more popular here in the U.S. Many love it for its eye watering cake, but not everybody.

INSKEEP: Dozens of Irwindale, California residents have complained about the spicy smell coming from the Huy Fong factory in the city where 200,000 bottles of the sauce are packed every day. Residents say that smell is causing headaches, eye and throat irritation.

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NPR Story
5:03 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Hotel Construction Booms Across U.S.

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And as the economy has improved, more people are traveling for business and pleasure, causing a jump in hotel bookings nationwide.

And as Colorado Public Radio's Ben Markus reports, lower vacancy rates mean higher room prices and a push for developers to build more hotels.

BEN MARKUS, BYLINE: Business is good these days for commercial real estate agent David Gleason. And that means he's traveling for work again.

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