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5:16 am
Thu February 6, 2014

David Beckham Wants Miami To Embrace Soccer

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:59 am

Soccer star David Beckham is bringing a Major League Soccer team to Miami. He made the announcement on Wednesday in downtown Miami, not far from a site he and his partners are looking at for a stadium. Miami, however, is a city where Major League Soccer has tried — and failed-- before.

NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu February 6, 2014

1 Show Left For Jay Leno's 'Tonight Show'

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tonight we'll be saying goodbye to a guy who will be leaving his job at the top of his game. Again.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, 'TONIGHT SHOW')

JAY LENO: A couple of weeks ago, President Obama called me and told me personally if I like my current job I can keep my current job. Well, and I believed him. Yeah, I believed him.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Airline Loses Jamaican Bobsled Team's Belongings

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu February 6, 2014

U.S. Olympians Are Without Their Greek Yogurt

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:59 am

Chobani, a Team USA sponsor, has decorated its containers of Greek yogurt in honor of the Olympics. But shipments of Chobani haven't made it to Sochi. Russian officials say the company failed to complete the necessary paperwork to allow the yogurt to enter the country.

NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Twitter Shares Drop After Earnings Report

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a drop for Twitter.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The social media company announced its first earnings report since becoming a publicly traded company, and the news is not good. Twitter's stock price 17 percent in the last quarter. This change is due largely to a sharp decline in new users. Only one million U.S. users were added in the final months of 2013. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Ga. Voters Surprised Macon Election Change Isn't Challenged

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:59 am

It's been almost eight months since the Supreme Court effectively stuck down Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. That section required places with a history of discrimination to get their local voting laws cleared by the federal government. When the Supreme Court ruled, it said people could file lawsuits if they felt disenfranchised. But it hasn't quite worked out that way.

NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Democrats Worry About Losing Senate Majority

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Economy
4:23 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Reining In Health Care Costs Key To Trimming Deficit

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 1:47 pm

The Congressional Budget Office earlier this week said this year's deficit is likely to be about one-third the size it was in 2009, when the Great Recession bottomed out. A recovering economy is the main reason for the deficit's improvement, but moderating health care costs have also contributed.

Harvard economist and health policy specialist David Cutler says getting the federal government's finances under control is all about health care.

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The Salt
3:26 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Woolly Mammoths' Taste For Flowers May Have Been Their Undoing

Woolly mammoths depended on tiny flowering plants for protein. Did the decline of the flowers cause their extinction?
Per Möller/Johanna Anjar

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 5:01 pm

They were some of the largest, hairiest animals ever to walk the Earth, but new research shows a big part of the woolly mammoth's diet was made up of tiny flowers.

The work is based on DNA analysis of frozen arctic soil and mammoth poop. It suggests that these early vegans depended on the flowers as a vital source of protein. And when the flowers disappeared after the last ice age, so too did the mammoths that ate them.

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Asia
3:25 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Chinese Flock To The Countryside For A More Authentic New Year

Chinese blacksmiths in Nuanquan (Warm Spring) Town perform a folk custom called "making trees and flowers." They throw ladles of molten iron onto a wall, creating showers of sparks. The centuries-old custom originated with blacksmiths too poor to afford fireworks. In recent years, urban tourists have flocked to this once obscure town over the Chinese New Year holiday to enjoy local folk customs.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 12:35 pm

China goes back to work Friday after a weeklong holiday marking the Year of the Horse. Traditionally, celebrations continue through the first month of the Lunar New Year.

As in years past, some 800 million viewers tuned in this year to the state TV New Year's gala program to watch Hong Kong actor Jackie Chan, French actress and singer Sophie Marceau, and other entertainers.

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Business
3:22 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Amtrak Fights Big Oil For Use Of The Rails

Amtrak trains on the Empire Builder route, which stops in Williston, N.D., have been facing long delays.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 12:03 pm

Oil business in North Dakota is creating some big headaches for Amtrak travelers. Trains on the popular Empire Builder route between Chicago and the Pacific Northwest are often delayed for hours.

One reason for the congestion is an influx of trains hauling crude oil across the Northern Plains.

The delays are becoming so bad that a passenger group now wants the U.S. transportation secretary to intervene.

Frozen Before Ice Fishing

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Parallels
3:21 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Tijuana Prisoner: I Was Forced To Dig Drug Tunnel To San Diego

A Mexican guard at a prison in Tijuana where 17 men are being held on charges they were digging a drug-smuggling tunnel from Tijuana to the U.S. border at San Diego. The men say they were kidnapped and forced to do the work.
Special to NPR

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 11:32 am

More than 75 drug-smuggling tunnels have been discovered under the U.S.-Mexico border in just the past six years, and one of the more intriguing cases involves 17 Mexican men who claim they were kidnapped and forced to carry out the work for months before Mexican authorities found them.

There's always been some mystery surrounding tunnels. Diggers were thought to be well-paid cartel loyalists or, as urban legend goes, laborers killed soon after the tunnel's completion to ensure its secrecy.

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The Record
12:02 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Eightball, MJG And Rap From Memphis 20 Years On

MJG (left) and Eightball in an early, undated photo.
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 4:08 pm

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The Two-Way
7:50 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Police Officer Arrests Firefighter At Accident Scene In California

How do we explain the arrest of a firefighter by a police officer at the scene of an accident — after an argument over where a fire truck should park? The authorities are still discussing the incident, which took place Tuesday night on California's I-805, where a car had rolled over at the center road barrier.

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The Two-Way
7:47 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Lawmaker Says Snowden Leaks Will Cost Country 'Billions To Repair'

Edward Snowden.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 9:36 pm

Following a classified briefing on Wednesday, the chairman and the vice chairman of the House Armed Services Committee said the "majority" of the classified information taken by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden had "nothing to do with the NSA," or its collection of bulk data.

"Instead [his leaks] specifically [work] to compromise the military capability and defense of the country," Rep. Mac Thornberry, a Texas Republican and the vice chairman of the committee, said during a press briefing.

Thornberry added the leaks will "certainly cost billions to repair."

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Around the Nation
6:43 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

More Than 80,000 Tons Of Coal Ash Flow Into N.C. River

Volunteers with the Dan River Basin Association, graduate students from Duke University and staff with the environmental group Appalachian Voices collect water samples on the Dan River after a massive coal ash spill.
Eric Chance Appalachian Voices

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

Over the weekend at an old power plant in Eden, N.C., a stormwater pipe that goes under a coal ash pond broke, sending about 82,000 tons of ash into the Dan River.

The river stretches more than 200 miles from North Carolina, through Virginia and into the Atlantic Ocean. It's home to all sorts of wildlife, and a popular destination for fishermen and kayakers.

On Wednesday, Jennifer Edwards, with the Dan River Basin Association, was checking the water and sediment about a mile downriver from the spill.

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Around the Nation
6:42 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Scientists Help Western States Prepare For Drought As New Norm

Frank Gehrke, chief of snow surveys in California, looks at wind speed, snow depth and moisture data collected at a survey site in Yosemite National Park.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 10:23 pm

At a 10,000-foot summit in Yosemite National Park, Frank Gehrke clicks into his cross-country skis and pushes off down a small embankment onto a meadow of crusty snow. He's California's chief of snow surveys, one of the most influential jobs in a state where snow and the water that comes from it are big currency. He's on his monthly visit to one of a dozen snowpack-measuring stations scattered across the high country of the Sierra Nevada.

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The Two-Way
6:42 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

U.S. Warns Airlines Over Potential Explosives In Toothpaste Tubes

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Officials from the Department of Homeland Security say they are warning airlines that terrorists traveling on Russian-bound planes could try to pack explosives into toothpaste tubes.

NPR's Brian Naylor reports the warning comes just as the Winter Olympics are set to kick off in Sochi. He filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The department says it is issuing a warning to airlines flying to Russia including flights originating in the U.S. out of an abundance of caution.

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Planet Money
6:34 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

A Venture Capitalist Is Betting A Pair Of Socks (And $50 Million) On Bitcoin's Future

Marc van der Chijs Flickr

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

Ben Horowitz is a big-time venture capitalist. His firm invested in Facebook and Twitter. More recently, his firm invested some $50 million in startups related to bitcoin, the virtual currency that works like online cash. Ben thinks bitcoin is going to change the way people buy and sell stuff on the Internet.

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The Two-Way
6:32 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

'Almost Otherworldly': The Sea Caves Of Lake Superior, On Ice

Scenes from the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Bayfield, Wis., where Lake Superior's ice is thick enough to walk to the area's sea caves for the first time in five years.
Derek Montgomery for MPR News

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 5:28 pm

This winter's intense cold has brought a fringe benefit to people who live around southern Lake Superior: They can walk to the uniquely beautiful, and currently frozen, sea caves of the Apostle Islands. It's the first time the lake's ice in that area has been thick enough to walk on since 2009.

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