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Movie Interviews
11:42 am
Sun January 12, 2014

From Asghar Farhadi, More Questions Than Answers

Filmmaker Asghar Farhadi and cinematographer Mahmoud Kalari discuss a shot during the making of The Past — the new drama from the director of the Oscar-winning A Separation.
Carole Bethuel Sony Pictures Classics

Filmmaker Asghar Farhadi became one of the world's most recognized Iranian artists when his movie A Separation won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film two years ago.

But he's not the sort of artist bent on addressing his nation's tumultuous relationship with the West through his work. He's more about showing us all what we have in common.

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The Two-Way
11:39 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Chemical In West Va. Water More Diluted, But Still Unsafe

Members of the Nitro Volunteer Fire Department distribute water to local residents on Saturday.
Michael Switzer AP

The amount of a dangerous chemical in West Virginian's tap water is more diluted, but it is still unsafe for drinking, washing or bathing.

WCHS-TV reports that Col. Greg Grant with the National Guard told reporters that they are seeing readings of methylcyclohexane methanol dip below 1 part per million, the amount that the Center for Disease Control says is safe, but those readings have spiked from time to time.

"The numbers are turning in the right direction," Grant said.

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It's All Politics
10:59 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Nation's New Mayors Revive Big-City Liberalism

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks after being sworn in during the public inauguration ceremony at City Hall in New York on Jan. 1.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 3:22 pm

Like all newly elected politicians, the class of mayors being sworn in as the year begins has made many grand promises.

From New York Mayor Bill de Blasio's pledge to provide universal pre-kindergarten classes, financed through taxes on wealthy individuals, to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's push for a $15 minimum hourly wage, their agenda looks decidedly liberal.

New mayors in cities such as Boston, Minneapolis and Pittsburgh have also been talking about the importance of racial inclusion and the need to address income inequality.

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Latin America
10:53 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Four Years After Earthquake, Many In Haiti Remain Displaced

Boys at a camp for earthquake victims look out from their shelter in Petion-ville, Haiti, outside of Port-au-Prince in November.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Four years ago Sunday, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit Haiti, destroying its capital of Port-au-Prince and killing more than 200,000 people.

Today, much of Port-au-Prince looks like it did before the quake. Most of the tent camps in the city itself are gone, and streets are loaded with overcrowded buses and women selling vegetables.

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The Sunday Conversation
10:05 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Transracial Family Gets Double Takes 'Everywhere We Go'

Rachel Garlinghouse is the author of Come Rain or Come Shine: A White Parent's Guide to Adopting and Parenting Black Children.
Jill Heupel

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 7:16 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Rachel Garlinghouse and her husband, Steve are both white, and they've adopted three kids — two girls and a boy — who are African-American. "We get double takes everywhere we go," Garlinghouse tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "You have to look at discrimination in a whole new way" as a transracial family.

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Middle East
10:00 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Ariel Sharon Was Part Of Israel's Tragedy And Solution

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

The body of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is lying in state in the Israeli parliament, the Knesset, today. He died yesterday after eight years in a coma. Ariel Sharon was a soldier-turned-politician who believed in hard-line military solutions, but who also looked beyond force to try to bring peace in Israel.

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Middle East
9:56 am
Sun January 12, 2014

New Constitution Is A Sign Of Tunisia's Optimism

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

On Tuesday, Tunisia will celebrate the third anniversary of its revolution. Tunisia is the country that inspired uprisings across the Arab world. Since then, that country has gone through tough times but it seems to have found its way again. Opposing sides have drafted the new constitution together. It will be ready in a couple days, and new elections are set for this year. That sets Tunisia apart from neighboring Egypt and Libya, where the Arab Spring uprisings have brought violence and political upheaval.

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Movie Interviews
9:56 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Death Squads Re-created 'The Act Of Killing' For The Camera

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Nominations for the Academy Awards will be announced this coming week. One film widely expected to make the list is the documentary "The Act of Killing." It was just released on DVD and digital platforms last week. The film is about a massacre of communists in Indonesia in the 1960s. But rather than hearing from the victims, filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer takes an unusual perspective. He shows the perpetrators reenacting their crimes. The result is haunting, even revolting at points and hard to describe.

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Europe
9:56 am
Sun January 12, 2014

New Tax Can't Keep Greeks From Smoking

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

To Greece now, a country with one of the highest percentages of smokers in the world. At least 40 percent of the population over the age of 15 smokes, leading, of course, to rising rates of lung disease and lung cancer. Several years ago, the Greek parliament banned smoking inside restaurants, bars and public buildings. But it's rarely enforced. And even a new tax on cigarettes doesn't seem to be deterring Greek smokers. Joanna Kakissis has the story from Athens.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Sports
9:56 am
Sun January 12, 2014

The Brawl Over Baseball Hall Of Fame Voting

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And it is time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: The Baseball Hall of Fame's new class of inductees was announced this past week and it caused quite a stir. The biggest controversy may not even be about who got in, but the actual voting. Also in baseball, A-Rod's suspension - the longest ever for doping in baseball history, although it has been reduced. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us to mull all of this over. Good morning.

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Music News
9:56 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Insane Clown Posse Sues FBI For Targeting Fans

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 12:02 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSANE CLOWN POSSE: (Singing) If magic is all we've ever known, then it's easy to miss what really goes on.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Strange News
9:56 am
Sun January 12, 2014

A Virtually Genuine Facebook Friendship With Applebee's

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Social media has become a form of customer helpline, allowing us to compliment and complain. And increasingly, enormous global companies, that would probably keep you on hold for hours on the phone, respond. But what about creating an ongoing Facebook friendship with an Applebee's? Seem a little crazy? Well, that's exactly what Steve Murray did. He goes by the name Chip Zdarsky as a comic artist and on his online profiles. And we had to ask him why, so we called him up in Toronto. Thanks so much for being with us, Chip.

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Business
9:56 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Neiman Marcus Credit Card Breach Heightens Consumer Concerns

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. If you use a credit card - and most of us do - it's hard not to be a little concerned. Discount retailer Target continues to apologize for a massive security breach over the holidays. And just yesterday, the high-end retailer Neiman Marcus disclosed that shoppers at its stores have been compromised as well. Independent investigative reporter Brian Krebs was the first to report on both these security breaches. He joins us to talk more. Welcome to the program, Brian.

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Afghanistan
9:14 am
Sun January 12, 2014

The Struggle Against A Newly Resurgent Al-Qaida

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:13 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Sam Berns, Teen Known For His Fight Against 'Aging Disease,' Dies

Sam Berns, 15, who has the very rare premature-aging disease progeria, plays the drums in his high school's marching band.
Courtesy of the Progeria Research Foundation

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:45 am

Sam Berns, the teen who became nationally known for his fight against a disease that accelerates aging, died on Friday from complications of his disorder.

As our friends at Shots explained back in September, Sam's parents, Leslie Gordon and Scott Berns, were spurred by his illness to find a cure for the disease.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:28 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Seeing The World Is Like Dancing With It

iStockphoto

When we gaze up into the night sky, we look out into the past. Adam Frank makes this point eloquently in a recent post. And it is a point redolent with consequence in the field of physics. It is the starting point of Einstein's special theory of relativity.

But is it right to suggest, as Adam does, that when I look into the face of my loved one across the table from me, what I see, really, is how she looked a tiny fraction of a second earlier? Adam writes:

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The Two-Way
8:07 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Israelis Pay Respects To Former Prime Minister Ariel Sharon

Israel's President Shimon Peres stands next the coffin of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon at the Knesset in Jerusalem on Sunday.
Bernat Armangue AP

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:52 am

The body of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon was lying in state on Sunday outside the country's parliament.

As Haaretz reports, the Israeli public, as well as top government officials gathered at the Knesset to pay their respects.

Sharon, one of Israel's most iconic figures, died on Saturday after spending eight years in a coma.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:02 am
Sun January 12, 2014

A's On Either End

NPR

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 11:41 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a word that begins and ends with the letter A. You'll be given an anagram of the letters between the A's. For example, given "ern," you would say, "arena."

Last week's challenge: Name something in five letters that's generally pleasant, it's a nice thing to have. Add the letters A and Y, and rearrange the result, keeping the A and Y together as a pair. You'll get the seven-letter word that names an unpleasant version of the five-letter thing. What is it?

Answer: Dream; Daymare

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Author Interviews
5:26 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Months After Marriage, A Military Wife Becomes An 'Unremarried Widow'

This photograph of Artis Henderson and her husband Miles was taken in 2006, on the day he deployed to Iraq. Miles was killed just a few months later in an Apache helicopter crash.
Simon & Schuster

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 12:47 pm

Artis Henderson never imagined she'd end up a military wife. She had dreams of becoming a writer and traveling the world; settling down with a conservative, church-going Army pilot wasn't the life she'd planned for herself.

But she fell in love with Miles Henderson and she followed him to Army bases in small towns where she struggled to fit into military life and culture. Then, in 2006, her new husband deployed to Iraq and was killed just months later in an Apache helicopter crash.

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The Salt
5:22 am
Sun January 12, 2014

Prison Gardens Help Inmates Grow Their Own Food — And Skills

Prisoners build an organic vegetable garden in the prison yard of the medium security unit at San Quentin State Prison in December.
Kirk Crippens Insight Garden Program

Last week, we reported on the correctional industry's enduring practice of punishing certain inmates with a bland, lumpish food known as "the loaf."

Fortunately, there are also more encouraging stories to tell about prison food.

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