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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Mon September 16, 2013

How To Watch As The Costa Concordia Is (Hopefully) Righted

The view Monday from shore as work began to pull the Costa Concordia upright. The box-like structure on the ship's port side is one of the refloating caissons that will stabilize the ship.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:38 am

  • NPR's Sylvia Poggioli on the salvaging of the Costa Concordia

The effort to shift the luxury cruise ship Consta Concordia into an upright position has begun, and several news outlets are streaming their coverage of what's said to be the biggest such operation of its kind ever.

Reuters is one good option. It has embedded its video feed in its live blogging of the operation.

The BBC's webcast, meanwhile, has the advantage of allowing you to mute the sound.

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The Two-Way
7:21 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Book News: Man Booker Prize To Be Opened To Americans

British authors such as Hilary Mantel will soon have some competition from across the pond, according to organizers of the Man Booker Prize.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:11 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Business
7:08 am
Mon September 16, 2013

United To Honor Free Tickets Generated During Glitch

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:02 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Mansfield Waits 121 Years For 2nd Night Game

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

In 1892, Mansfield University held the first night football game. Brand-new electric lights illuminated the field, just not very well. Squinting in the darkness, players tackled their own teammates and even the ref. Mansfield abandoned night games until this past Saturday, then the Pennsylvania school defeated Princeton. The athletic director says the 121-year pause between night games allowed time to work out the bugs.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:50 am
Mon September 16, 2013

More Rain Expected As Helicopters Search For Stranded Flood Victims

Miranda Woodard and Joey Schendel salvage and clean property after days of flooding in Hygiene, Colo. Mountain towns that had been cut off for days by massive flooding slowly reopened Monday, to reveal cabins toppled, homes ripped from their foundations and everything covered in a thick layer of muck.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 6:02 pm

This post was last updated at 6 p.m. ET.

Helicopters were back in the air on Monday over the 15 counties across Colorado's Front Range where historic flooding has killed at least seven people, left hundreds more stranded and unaccounted for, and forced nearly 12,000 to evacuate their homes.

In a news conference, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said 21 helicopters were conducting "search and rescue missions," and other teams were trying to assess the damage to transportation infrastructure.

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Europe
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Engineers Begin Righting Wrecked Cruise Ship

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

The Costa Concordia is lying on its side in shallow waters off the west coast of Italy. It struck a reef 20 months ago when the captain steered too close to land. Thirty-two people died. On Monday, the task is to begin to slowly rotate the ship to an upright position, using a complex system of chains and underwater platforms and cables.

Middle East
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Weapons Inspector Points Out Challenges Facing Deal On Syria

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's get an assessment of the weekend deal between the United States and Russia on chemical weapons in Syria.

GREENE: David Kay inspected Iraq for weapons of mass destruction once after the Gulf War in 1991, and a second time after the U.S. invasion in 2003.

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Environment
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Debate Revs As Decision Stalls Over Oil Pipeline From Canada

A 60-foot section of pipe is lowered into a trench during construction of the Gulf Coast Pipeline in Prague, Okla., in March. The Gulf Coast Pipeline, a 485-mile crude oil line, is part of the Keystone XL project and will run from Cushing, Okla. to Nederland, Texas. Although this southern stretch of the pipeline is nearly finished, the northern stretch is still under study.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 12:56 pm

Five years ago this week, a Canadian company proposed building a pipeline to send heavy crude oil from Alberta to U.S. refineries. Although the Obama administration's answer on the Keystone XL pipeline is not expected anytime soon, politicians in Washington and Canada are ramping up the pressure for the project, while environmentalists are pushing hard against it.

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Asia
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

South, North Koreans To Return To Kaesong Complex

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

South Korean managers are heading back to their factories at a complex located just north of the Demilitarized Zone. They're teaming up with North Korean workers to test-run idle assembly lines. The complex has been closed for five months because of political tensions between the two countries.

Europe
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Germany's Refugee Policy Tested By New Arrivals

NPD Party activists hold up German flags in the Hellersdorf-Marzahn district of Berlin last month, as they protest a new home for asylum seekers.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 12:43 pm

As many as 5,000 Syrian refugees are moving to Germany this month after Chancellor Angela Merkel's government agreed to a U.N. request to host them. But they aren't receiving the warmest welcome in a country where a growing number of Germans are unhappy about the steady stream of asylum seekers. Fanning the flames are right wing extremists, who want Germany to close its doors to refugees.

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Europe
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

U.S. Allies Meet In Paris On Syria Plan

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene. Good morning. A diplomatic deal between the United States and Russia addresses a crisis over Syria, but does not end that crisis. The two powers agreed that Syria should quickly surrender its chemical weapons.

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Movies
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

'The Muslims Are Coming!' To Middle America

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A group of Muslim comics went on tour through parts of Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, as well as Arizona. Their mission was to help Americans equate Islam with funny, rather than fundamentalist. And that is the topic of a new documentary called, "The Muslims Are Coming."

NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji met up with the directors.

SHEREEN MARISOL MERAJI, BYLINE: Here's a quick taste of what happens when Muslim comics invade Middle America.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "THE MUSLIMS ARE COMING")

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Around the Nation
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Rain Still Falling In Waterlogged Northern Colorado

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Residents are flocking to shelters to escape massive flooding from days of rain. Hundreds of people remain stranded. Four deaths have been blamed on the deluge, and authorities fear the death toll could go higher.

Analysis
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Obama Faces Huge Economic Concerns

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 9:39 am

One issue is whether the government will be forced to shut down because it can't pay its bills. The other is whether that failure would put the country into a default position.

Politics
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Summers Pulls His Name From Consideration For Fed Chief

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers has withdrawn from consideration as the next chairman of the Federal Reserve. He cited a potentially divisive nomination hearing. Summers was widely thought to be President Obama's top choice to replace Ben Bernanke next year.

Business
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Chili's To Install Table-Top Computers Screens

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Chili's Grill & Bar is leading the way in digital dining. The restaurant chain is installing table-top computer screens to allow customers to place orders and swipe their credit card, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Sports
4:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Crowded Field Tries To Make Baseball's Post Season

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

The end of Major League Baseball's regular season is less than two weeks away. It's the time of year when a long plodding season breaks into an all-out sprint among teams trying to qualify for the playoffs. The field this year is especially crowded as a few of the usual suspects are joined in the chase by some newcomers.

Parallels
3:35 am
Mon September 16, 2013

With A Card Game, The Portuguese Get Back At Their Creditors

Carlos Mesquita (left) and Filipe Preto invented Vem aí a Troika (Here Comes the Troika), a satirical card game that pokes fun at Portugal's economic crisis and its creditors.
Lauren Frayer

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 1:39 pm

In a typical cafe in downtown Lisbon, old men play cards or dominoes over cups of milky coffee or cold glasses of vinho verde and commiserate about the economy.

One of their favorite ways to do this is through a new card game that's all the rage in Lisbon these days. Vem Aí a Troika, or Here Comes the Troika, is a satirical cross between Monopoly and Old Maid, in which players try to stash away savings in offshore accounts, win elections — and avoid the dreaded troika card.

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All Tech Considered
3:35 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Dear Apple: Good Luck Against The Smartphone Black Market

Apple's fingerprint technology is an effort to combat smartphone theft.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:09 pm

Last week, Apple introduced two new iPhones with new features, including fingerprint recognition on one model, and extra password protections. But the new technology is up against a sophisticated black market that has had years to grow and adapt to meet the world's desire for smartphones.

To call smartphone-related crime an epidemic is not an exaggeration. By one estimate, more than 4,000 phones are stolen every day in the United States.

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