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Ask Me Another
1:03 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Isn't It Ironic?

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 9:54 am

Rest assured, this game contains no ironic t-shirts or mustaches. Here, irony is defined as an "incongruous yet appropriate juxtaposition that highlights the discordant, revelatory nature of the universe." Deep. Play along as host Ophira Eisenberg asks contestants about certain ironic situations, like how the best-selling holiday song of all time, "White Christmas," was written by Irving Berlin--who was Jewish.

Plus, Jonathan Coulton tops off this game with a rendition of the pop standard "Everything Happens To Me."

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Business
12:37 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Maybe 'Muddling Through' Isn't That Bad For The Economy

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:15 pm

When the global financial system started to collapse five years ago, leaders from the Treasury Department, Congress and the Federal Reserve jumped up and started running.

Like men on a burning wooden bridge, they raced along, making crazy-fast decisions. They seized Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, bailed out big banks, saved automakers, slashed interest rates and funded a massive infrastructure-building project to stimulate growth.

But that was then.

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Code Switch
12:21 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Back To School, Back To Being The 'Only' One

What's your favorite, most poignant, uproarious story of being the odd person out?
Cristian Baitg iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 3:41 pm

In August, we asked folks to share stories from moments when they've been the odd person out, the only one of their kind. We wanted to hear the uproariously funny and poignant stories that stuck in people's memories. And many of the memories that were shared came from the classroom. Below, you'll find some of our favorites — enjoy.

Rebecca Eng from Edinburgh:

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Politics
12:09 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Rand Paul On Syria: 'I Think There's Evil On Both Sides'

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky is a member of the Foreign Relations Committee.
U.S. Senate Photographic Studio Rand Paul

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:21 pm

Kentucky Republican Rand Paul is a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and one of Congress' leading skeptics of U.S. military strategy, including possible strikes on Syria. On Tuesday, he offered a detailed response to President Obama's speech about the Syrian crisis. Paul joins Michel Martin of Tell Me More to talk about his opposition to military action, and what the U.S. should do.

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Books
12:09 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

'Buck' Tells Of Wild Childhood In 'Killadelphia'

Author MK Asante
Lee Steffen Spiegel & Grau

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 3:39 pm

Writer, hip-hop artist and filmmaker MK Asante's new memoir is called Buck. It's about growing up in North Philadelphia in the 1990s. Asante describes his adolescence as, "Me, unsupervised, with my brother gone, my dad gone, my mom gone, and me just on the block in the neighborhood, roaming the streets of Philly - just lost."

Buck captures Asante's transformation from a drug dealer and delinquent to a poet and professor.

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Around the Nation
12:09 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Do Americans Feel A Responsibility To Act In Syria?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Parallels
12:06 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

On Anniversary Of Benghazi Attack, Libya Still Struggles

People gather at the site of a car bombing in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday — one year to the date after an attack on the U.S. consulate in the city killed the ambassador and three other Americans.
Mohammed el-Shaiky AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 1:33 pm

The deadly attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, which took place a year ago Wednesday, symbolized the violence, chaos and struggles that have defined Libya since the ousting of dictator Moammar Gadhafi two years ago.

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The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Men Convicted In India Gang Rape To Be Sentenced Friday

During a demonstration Wednesday, Indian activists hold posters of the four men convicted in the New Delhi gang rape case that shocked the country.
Narinder Nanu AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 2:45 pm

The four men convicted of the New Delhi gang rape that took the life of a 23-year-old woman last December will learn their fate on Friday.

The court considered Wednesday whether they should get capital punishment or life in prison.

In sentencing arguments that stretched to three hours, public prosecutor Dayan Krishnan called on the court to impose the death penalty for what he called a "diabolical" crime.

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It's All Politics
11:53 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Obama's Problem: The Path Forward In Syria Is No Clearer

President Obama walks out of a meeting with the Senate Democratic Caucus at the Capitol on Tuesday.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:08 pm

With the highly anticipated Syria speech behind him, the path ahead for President Obama's effort to get congressional authorization of military strikes in Syria is no easier than before. In fact, post-speech, it seems more obstacle-strewn and steeper than ever.

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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Series Reveals Underground Market For 'Re-Homing' Adoptees

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 2:40 pm

In an exhaustive, 18-month investigation, Reuters has detailed a practice in the U.S. of "private re-homing" of unwanted foreign adoptees and allegations of sexual and physical abuse at the hands of guardians.

In the five-part series "The Child Exchange: Inside America's underground market for adopted children," Reuters tracked down several adopted children who it says had been passed from one guardian to another through contacts made on groups on Yahoo and Facebook specializing in such re-homing.

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Parallels
11:21 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Lessons From Libya On How To Destroy Chemical Weapons

President George W. Bush receives a tour of nuclear material surrendered by Libya and flown to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a U.S. facility in Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2004.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 2:50 pm

When the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, one of the broader goals was to send a strong deterrent message to other dictators who might have weapons of mass destruction (even if Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein didn't).

Recent events in Syria show that President Bashar Assad didn't heed the warning. But Libya's Moammar Gadhafi did.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Wed September 11, 2013

If Verizon Sells A Record $49B In Bonds, Are Good Times Ahead?

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 12:22 pm

The number is stunning:

"Verizon Communications could be taking on nearly $50 billion in new debt in a massive bond sale to help the telecom giant pay for its $130 billion acquisition of Verizon Wireless shares," writes USA Today.

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The Protojournalist
11:14 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Never-Ending Stories: Commerce Versus Conservation

A lone bison in Theodore Roosevelt National Park, near where fracking has become standard practice.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:13 pm

Writing in the Washington Post recently, Darryl Fears points out that sometime during September, the U.S.

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Live At The Village Vanguard
10:16 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Dave King Trio: Live At The Village Vanguard

Dave King.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:54 pm

Perhaps you know Dave King as the drummer in The Bad Plus, or any number of avant-improv/indie-rock/Americana/electronic experimental bands rooted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. But somewhere in that mix is a deep fondness for the jazz tradition, and recently, he made it a point to say so with a full-length album. I've Been Ringing You investigates standards, mostly slow and medium-tempo ballads, in rough-hewn textures.

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The Two-Way
9:20 am
Wed September 11, 2013

One Year After Benghazi Attack, 'Huge Gap' In Investigation

Sept. 11: The U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was aflame after coming under attack.
AFP/Getty Images

There are two sad anniversaries today. As we said earlier, the nation is pausing to mark the 12 years since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

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Shots - Health News
8:52 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Fast Tests For Drug Resistance Bolster Malaria Fight

A Cambodian boy gets tested for malaria at a clinic along the Thai-Cambodian border in 2010. Three strains of drug-resistant malaria have emerged from this region over the past 50 years.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 11:15 am

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Nation Pauses To Mark Sept. 11 Attacks

A woman looks out at One World Trade Center from inside the 9/11 Empty Sky memorial at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J., on Wednesday. Americans commemorated the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks with solemn ceremonies and pledges to not forget the nearly 3,000 people killed.
Gary Hershorn Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 12:51 pm

It was just after 8:45 a.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, when the first jet struck the World Trade Center in New York City and the worst terrorist attack in the nation's history began. Nearly 3,000 people died.

At that time this morning, many Americans paused for a moment of silence. President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama were among them.

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This Is NPR
8:44 am
Wed September 11, 2013

You've Tracked Down Hundreds Of Accessible Playgrounds. Help Us Find More!

NPR designer Alyson Hurt's early sketch of the interface for editing accessible playgrounds.
Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 9:05 am

When NPR launched a national guide to accessible playgrounds two weeks ago, we knew it wasn't perfect.

It's not perfect because there isn't an official, comprehensive database of playgrounds with components designed for kids with special needs available to use as a source.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Book News: Richard Dawkins Under Fire For Child Abuse Remarks

Author and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins made a March 2012 visit to NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 10:57 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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