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All Songs Considered
10:18 am
Sun September 8, 2013

All Aboard A Magical Mystery Train

One of the nine restored train cars that are part of the Station to Station public art project. This car is called Lambert's Point Executive Lounge
Bob Boilen NPR

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 12:24 pm

What happens when you fill nine train cars with noisemaking musicians Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth, Japan's The Boredoms, LA's fuzzed-out Ariel Pink and more?

I'm about to find out.

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The Two-Way
9:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

France Leads Europe In Hunting, Newspaper Says

Hunters gather prior to a wild boar hunt in Pietrosella, on the French Mediterranean island of Corsica, in August.
Pascal Pochard Casabianca AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 10:46 am

French sports fans are known for their love of soccer. But according to Le Figaro, the country's "second sport" is hunting. The newspaper cites the National Federation of Hunters, which says that among all European countries, France has the most hunters.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Man, 107, Dies In Shootout With Police

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 10:43 am

A 107-year-old Arkansas man who held off police is dead after a SWAT team stormed a house during a reported exchange of gunfire on Saturday afternoon.

Police officers had arrived at the house in Pine Bluff, Ark., to investigate a report of a domestic disturbance. They spoke with two people, who said Monroe Isadore had pointed a gun at them. Isadore was in his bedroom, they said.

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Middle East
7:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

'The Family House Was Hit': Syrian Attack Kills Palestinians

Ahmed al-Hurani, left, and his son, Bassam, live in the West Bank. Eleven members of their family living in Syria died in the chemical attack on Aug. 21.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 10:38 am

The U.S. says more than 1,400 people were killed by chemical weapons in Syria on Aug. 21. Other sources have cited lower figures.

Not all victims were Syrian. A Palestinian family in Jenin, in the northern West Bank, is mourning the loss of 11 members.

'Everyone Inside Had Died'

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The Sunday Conversation
7:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Nuremberg Prosecutor Makes The Case For Trying Assad

Benjamin Ferencz speaks at the inauguration of the "Memorial Nuremberg Trials" information and documentation center in Nuremberg, Germany, on Nov. 21, 2010. After World War II, Ferencz served as a chief prosecutor in the Nuremberg trials of Nazi war criminals.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

When he was just 27 years old, Benjamin Ferencz helped prosecute Nazi leaders in the Nuremburg war crimes trial after World War II. In the years since, the Harvard-educated lawyer has continued to focus on issues of international criminal justice.

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NPR Story
7:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Estefan Sings The American Songbook — With A Latin Twist

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:10 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Gloria Estefan, the poster girl of the Latin music scene in the 1980s and '90s, the frontwoman for the Miami Sound Machine and the singer who made Middle America get up and conga...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG MEDLEY)

GLORIA ESTEFAN: (Singing) Doctor, I've got this feeling inside of me, deep inside of me...come, shake your body, baby, do that conga. No, you can't control yourself any longer. Come on, shake your body, baby...the rhythm is gonna get you tonight.

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Science
7:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

'Memory Pinball' And Other Reasons You Need A Nap

On the surface, sleep may seem like an evolutionary disaster, but its benefits have come to outweigh its potential downsides.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

We spend about one-third of our lives sleeping, but much of that function remains a mystery. Weekend Edition Sunday is asking some pretty fundamental, yet complicated, questions about why we do it and why we can't seem to get more of it.

Dr. Matthew Walker says the question of why we sleep remains "that archetypal mystery."

Walker, the principal investigator at the sleep lab the University of California, Berkeley, works with patients who suffer from sleep abnormalities. He says the complexity of sleep makes the research that much more fascinating.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

The Mysteries Of Sleep Were Just Too Mysterious

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We've been exploring the mystery of sleep this morning - how we're not getting enough of it and why we need it in the first place.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: We asked our listeners to share their sleep troubles.

EMILY MCMAMEE: So, I have always sleptwalked and slept-talked and it's always been amusing for everybody else around me. I learn about it the next morning when people tell me, you know, did you know that you just did this?

MARTIN: Emily McMamee is from Starksboro, Vermont.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Olympic Committee Picks A New Olympic Sport

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: Yesterday in Buenos Aires, the International Olympic Committee went eenie-meenie-minie-moe and decided which city will host the 2020 Olympics.

JACQUES ROGGE: The Games of the 32nd Olympiad in 2020 are awarded to the city of Tokyo.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

MARTIN: And the crowd goes wild. NPR's Mike Pesca was there. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Dreams: The Telling Tells More Than The Contents

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So like many people, Billy Crystal can't sleep. And if you're not sleeping you're not dreaming, which could also be problematic.

Psychoanalyst Stephen Grosz says dreams are crucial.

DR. STEPHEN GROSZ: They seem to be a part of what it is to be human, and something which has been a part of human life for as long as we know.

MARTIN: In his book, "The Examined Life," Grosz writes about how dreams often reveal things about his patients that they hide even from themselves.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Billy Crystal, Up Since 1948

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MR. SANDMAN")

THE CHORDETTES: (Singing) Bum, bum, bum, bum, bum, bum, bum, bum. Bum, bum, bum, bum, bum. Bum...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're talking this morning about sleep - why we do it, why we can't seem to get more of it.

Yesterday, WEEKEND EDITION's Scott Simon chatted with a comedian who has his own sleep troubles. Billy Crystal writes about them in his new book, "Still Fooling Them."

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Has insomnia been an important part of your life?

BILLY CRYSTAL: I've been up since 1948.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Arsenio Hall Returns To Late Night

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

In the late 1980s and early '90s, success in the competitive world of late-night television sounded like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND DOG POUND NOISE)

MARTIN: That, of course, was the signature shout out from "The Arsenio Hall Show." Arsenio interviewed everyone from Muhammad Ali to Madonna and, of course, there was that seminal pop culture moment when then-presidential candidate Bill Clinton played the sax on the Arsenio stage.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Critics Say Egypt's Constitution Process Is Flawed

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Egypt, the interim government is trying to wipe out every trace of the Islamist legacy during their rule, even replacing the constitution they had adopted late last year. To that end, the military-backed interim president last week appointed a 50-member committee to help draft a new constitution. That committee, which includes only one of ousted President Mohamed Morsi's allies, meets for the first time today Sunday in Cairo. Critics in Egypt say the new constitution is likely to be just as controversial as the last one.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Pope Leads Prayer Vigil For Peace In Syria

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Syria is also on the mind of pope Francis. Last night, the pope made a somber appeal to the United States to reject any military strikes against Syria. The Vatican estimates some 100,000 people gathered to pray and meditate during a four-hour long peace vigil in St. Peter's Square in Rome.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli was there.

(SOUNDBITE OF GREGORIAN CHANT)

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Congress Votes This Week On Military Action In Syria

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

This coming week will be vital to the White House's effort to win support for a military strike on Syria. On Tuesday night, President Obama will lay out his case in an effort to shift public opinion in favor of a strike. The Senate is set to vote on the president's resolution this week and the House is expected to follow thereafter.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Sun September 8, 2013

How Sounds Undermine Sleep

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Why can some people sleep through a jackhammer at the window, while others waken with the lightest whisper? Host Rachel Martin speaks to Johns Hopkins Sleep Disorders Center researcher Jeffrey Ellenbogen about his new study on how noises interrupt sleep.

Sunday Puzzle
5:40 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Close, But No Cigar

NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 2:09 pm

On-air challenge: Each of the following answers is a made-up, two-word phrase in which the two words are homophones, and both words start with the letter C.

Last week's challenge from listener Henry Hook of Brooklyn: Think of a well-known celebrity who goes by a single name — the last two letters of which are alphabetically separated by only one letter (like A and C, or B and D). Replace this pair of letters with the one that separates them, and you'll have a common, everyday word. What is it?

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Environment
5:32 am
Sun September 8, 2013

Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors

A white snowshoe hare against a brown background makes the animal easy prey.
L.S. Mills Research Photo

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

The effects of climate change often happen on a large scale, like drought or a rise in sea level. In the hills outside Missoula, Mont., wildlife biologists are looking at a change to something very small: the snowshoe hare.

Life as snowshoe hare is pretty stressful. For one, almost everything in the forest wants to eat you.

Alex Kumar, a graduate student at the University of Montana, lists the animals that are hungry for hares.

"Lynx, foxes, coyotes, raptors, birds of prey. Interestingly enough, young hares, their main predator is actually red squirrels."

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The Mix
4:07 am
Sun September 8, 2013

The Mix: Britpop At 20

Members of Suede in 1993, left to right: Simon Gilbert, Bernard Butler, Brett Anderson, Matt Osman.
Steve Jennings Corbis

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:22 pm

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Author Interviews
3:14 am
Sun September 8, 2013

The 'Wild' Story Of Cheryl Strayed And Her Long-Lost Half-Sister

In addition to Wild, Cheryl Strayed is also the author of Torch and Tiny Beautiful Things.
Joni Kabana Courtesy Knopf

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:40 pm

Back in 1995, Cheryl Strayed hiked 1,100 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail along the West Coast of the United States. After the three-month journey, she came out on the other side stronger in every way: better able to cope with her divorce, her past drug abuse and her mother's death.

Strayed described the life-changing trek in her 2012 bestselling memoir Wild, and received countless emails from readers describing how connected they felt to her story. But there was one message that stood out in particular:

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