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Code Switch
1:03 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Did The NAACP Learn Anything From Meeting With The KKK?

NAACP leaders from the Casper, Wyo., branch speak with members of the KKK at a heavily guarded meeting this past week.
Alan Rogers Casper Star-Tribune

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 10:36 pm

"I think all my first dates were probably less awkward than this," says Jeremy Fugleberg, referring to the NAACP's meeting on Saturday night with the Ku Klux Klan in a hotel conference room in Casper, Wyo. Fugleberg is assistant managing editor for news at the Casper Star-Tribune and reported on the gathering.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
12:36 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Chuck Mangione On Piano Jazz

Chuck Mangione.
Courtesy of the artist

Flugelhorn player Chuck Mangione is widely known for the crossover success of his catchy mid-1970s tunes. But his jazz credentials are rock-solid: His mentor Dizzy Gillespie once recommended him for a spot in Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers. Mangione and bassist Gary Mazzaroppi team up with host Marian McPartland for some dynamic trio work in a session from 1999, including his famous tune "Feels So Good" and a few beloved standards.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Antitrust Monitor Ordered For Apple Over E-Book Price Fixing

Amazon's Kindle e-reader. Apple has been ordered to submit to a monitor to ensure it doesn't fix prices on e-books in future.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:44 pm

A federal judge who found Apple guilty of colluding with publishers in an e-book price-fixing scheme ordered the tech giant on Friday to modify its contracts and submit to oversight to make sure it doesn't happen again.

The injunction issued by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan against orders the iPad maker to hire an external compliance monitor for two years to supervise the company's antitrust compliance efforts, The Associated Press reports.

Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple says it plans to appeal.

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Politics
12:04 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Republicans Divided Over Potential Strike On Syria

Republican congressional leaders support an American military strike in Syria, but the rank-and-file membership is divided. GOP Congressmen Doug Collins of Georgia and Luke Messer of Indiana serve on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. They talk about the debate in the Republican caucus.

Barbershop
12:04 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Gearing Up For Football Season

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 10:36 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Race
12:04 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Did The NAACP Learn Anything From Meeting With The Klan?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
12:04 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Five Years After Wall Street Collapsed, What's Changed?

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 10:36 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later, it sounds like a bad walks-into-a-bar joke, but it wasn't. Recently, a representative of the KKK had a sit-down with members of the NAACP. This took place in Casper, Wyoming. Reporter Jeremy Fugleberg was there for the whole thing, and tells us what happened. That's in just a few minutes.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:03 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

What We Can Never, Ever Know: Does Science Have Limits?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:10 pm

I got two books in the mail that, if they could have, would've poked, scratched and ripped each others' pages out. I don't know if Martin Gardner and Patricia Churchland ever met, but their books show that there are radically, even ferociously, different ways to think about science. Gardner died last year. He was a science writer whose monthly "Mathematical Games" column in Scientific American was wildly popular. Patricia Churchland is a philosopher who teaches at U.C. San Diego.

The issue between them is: How much can we know about the universe?

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Hitler's Last Bodyguard Dies; Was With The Fuhrer In Bunker

Rochus Misch, one of Adolf Hitler's bodyguards, in 1944. He died Thursday in Germany at the age of 96.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:35 pm

Rochus Misch, "Adolf Hitler's devoted bodyguard for most of World War II and the last remaining witness to the Nazi leader's final hours in his Berlin bunker," has died, The Associated Press reports.

Misch was 96. He died Thursday in Germany.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

This Doc's Prescription? Use This App, Twice Daily

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next up, if you like to meet a doctor - I'd like you to meet him - who prescribes not only medicine to his patients, but smartphone apps as well. And now there are apps that can measure your blood pressure, your glucose level. It can take and EKG or an ultrasound. It can even monitor your sleep. You need an add-on gadget to plug into your phone to do these things, but in many cases, it's a lot cheaper than getting the actual lab test done.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

NASA Craft to Sniff Moondust, Test Laser Broadband

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Back in 1972, during Apollo's final mission to the moon, Apollo 17 astronaut Gene Cernan spotted a strange phenomenon, a glow along the horizon of the moon just before sunrise, followed by mysterious streamers of light, sort of like, you know, the rays of sunlight you see peaking through a cloud. Well, he made a sketch describing it, and since then, scientists have been trying to figure out what the heck he saw.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Wildfires Consume Funds Flagged for Prevention

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next up: wildfires. California's Rim Fire is not 80 percent contained, with some 4,000 firefighters still on the job. All that emergency response, of course, costs money, which federal government budgets for each year. But it doesn't seem to be enough, because three weeks ago, the head of the U.S. Forest Service announced that the Forest Service had burned through its firefighting budget, and would have to drain money earmarked for other things, like fire prevention.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Worldwide Researchers Flock to Penguin Meeting

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Just about everybody loves penguins, right? They're funny on land. They're amazing underwater, and they're very photogenic, so they show up in lots of ads and movies. But beyond the screen, prospects for the birds are not entirely good. This week, over 200 researches from around the world met in the U.K. to talk penguins, from the prospects of conservation of species to how penguins are able to stay under water so long, to the properties of penguin poop.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Radio Rewind: Monty Hall

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 2:23 pm

In 1993, Monty Hall, host of the game show Let's Make a Deal, joined us on the program to discuss how contestants used risk and probability to win big prizes.

The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Quick Question: Can Only The Rich Be President?

Donald Trump says he is considering running for president in 2016.
Robin Marchant Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:31 pm

Do you have to be rich to be president of the United States of America?

Donald Trump told ABC News recently that he might run for president in 2016 and that he is qualified because, among other reasons, he has amassed a net worth of more than $10 billion. "I'd spend a lot" on a campaign, he says. "I'd spend whatever it took."

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Shots - Health News
10:45 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Scientists Put A 'Sixth Sense' For Numbers On Brain Map

A sixth sense? A small patch of neurons on either side of the brain recognizes how many dots are on a screen. As more dots appear, active neurons shift to the right.
Courtesy of Ben Harvey/Utretch University

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:25 pm

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Interviews
10:43 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Katey Sagal, Holding Court On 'Sons Of Anarchy'

Katey Sagal as Gemma Teller Morrow in Sons of Anarachy on FX.
Prashant Gupta FX

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:51 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 31, 2012.

As Gemma, the fierce matriarch of the biker gang in the FX series Sons of Anarchy, Katey Sagal has shot and killed people, hit somebody with a skateboard, pulled a gun on a baby and done other horrible things. It's all part of the challenge of playing the character, Sagal says.

"She does things in the name of loyalty, which I relate to, but she goes way beyond anything I would do."

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The Two-Way
10:07 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Obama To Address Nation About Syria On Tuesday

President Obama during his news conference Friday in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:44 am

Saying he will continue to "make the best case" in coming days for taking military action against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, President Obama has announced that he will speak to the American people Tuesday about why he's come to that conclusion.

Obama's statement came Friday at the start of a news conference he's holding in St. Petersburg, Russia, where the G-20 Summit of world leaders wrapped up Friday. He spoke for about 50 minutes. We followed along. Scroll down to see what the president had to say.

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TED Radio Hour
9:58 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What Does YouTube Tell Us About Millennials?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:55 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Kevin Allocca's TEDTalk

YouTube Trends Manager Kevin Allocca watches and thinks about popular videos for a living. He talks about how interactive participation has become a crucial part of entertainment — and that Millennials will only demand more.

About Kevin Allocca

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TED Radio Hour
9:58 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is It Ok To Use The M-Word?

Neil Howe coined the term "millennials" back in 1991.
Neil Howe

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 12:27 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Neil Howe's Interview

When demographer Neil Howe first coined the term Millennial back in 1991, he didn't expect it to become a loaded word for a generation some call lazy and entitled. But Howe is optimistic about this generation — and so are lots of Millennials.

About Neil Howe

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