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The Salt
8:32 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Top German Chocolate Maker Fights For Its 'Natural' Reputation

If you're selling food in Germany, "natural" is good. It's a place that distrusts technological manipulation of what we eat.

Witness, for example, a 500-year-old law that allows beer-makers to use only three ingredients: water, barley and hops. The law has since been loosened slightly, but many brewers continue to abide by it for marketing reasons.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Book News: Efforts To Ban Books On The Rise

Joe Songer AL.COM/Landov

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 10:03 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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All Songs Considered
8:03 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Bob Boilen's Favorite Lyrics Of 2013

Piper Ferguson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 12:32 pm

I'm a lyrics guy. Great words drive me to a song. Bad lyrics drive me away. As a lyrics guy, I find that my favorite songs often also have my favorite words. I love a good melody and a beat, but I love it more when those elements support a good story, an insight, an emotional outpouring, something I can connect to.

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Code Switch
7:57 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Hey Hey Hey! Historian Draws Attention To '70s Black Animation Art

An original production cel from Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. The show was among a burst of 1970s-era Saturday morning cartoons that featured positive African-American characters.
Courtesy of Pamela Thomas/Museum of UnCut Funk!

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 1:34 pm

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Food
7:48 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Want A New Twist On A Traditional Holiday Dish?

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with a new twist on a traditional holiday dish. No, I'm not talking about turducken. This year's novelty poultry might be the chickenbear. Russian artist Viktor Ivanov has created a teddy bear out of chicken meat, covered in chicken skin, with olives for eyes. British chef Simon Hulstone uploaded a photo of the meaty teddy and tweeted that he intends to serve it to his kids for Christmas dinner.

Now I want to know what he's putting in their stockings.

Around the Nation
7:47 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Snow Prints Lead Cops To Hiding Suspect

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Two-Way
7:38 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Snowden Says His Mission Is Accomplished; 'I Already Won'

Edward Snowden in an image from an October TV report.
AFP/Getty Images

In his first in-person interviews since his explosive revelations last June, "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden tells The Washington Post that in his mind, "the mission's already accomplished."

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First Reads
7:03 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Exclusive First Read: Chang-rae Lee's 'On Such A Full Sea'

Chang-rae Lee won the PEN/Hemingway award for best first novel for 1995's Native Speaker. His most recent book was 2010's The Surrendered.
Annika Lee

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 9:37 am

Chang-rae Lee's new novel, On Such a Full Sea, opens in a surprisingly contented dystopia: Hundreds of years in the future, the world has unraveled; in America, the government has crumbled and the population has fled. But its abandoned cities have been given new life by immigrant workers, moved in by big multinational corporations to provide pristine fish and produce to elite enclaves. In B-mor (once known as Baltimore), workers from China have built a relatively stable and prosperous community — though outside the walls of B-mor, the open counties are still lawless and rough.

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The Two-Way
6:52 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Top Stories: Spacewalk Resumes; Fears Grow In South Sudan

Good morning.

One early Tuesday headline and two from Monday evening:

-- WATCH LIVE: Space Station Spacewalk

-- Alan Turing, Who Cracked Nazi Code, Gets Posthumous Pardon

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The Two-Way
6:31 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Repairs Done, Astronauts Wrap Up Spacewalk

Astronaut Mike Hopkins during Saturday's spacewalk. He's going out again Tuesday.
NASA.gov

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 4:12 pm

Spacewalking astronauts have successfully replaced a failed coolant pump on the International Space Station.

NPR's Joe Palca reports that American spacewalkers Michael Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio had to bolt the massive pump in place (on the ground, it weighs 780 pounds), connect four ammonia lines and plug in five electrical cables. The ammonia is a refrigerant used in the station's two-part cooling system, which is necessary to dissipate heat from the onboard electrical equipment.

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Business
5:30 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Target's Troubles Mount After Payment Data Breach

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a legal bullseye on Target.

OK. More than a dozen customers have now filed lawsuits against the retail giant. This is after Target's security was breached and information from nearly 40 million credit and debit cards were stolen.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports that the company is in full defense mode.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: Target has offered credit monitoring to its consumers. It's taken to every social medium to get out its story. That's while the first lawsuits have begun to poor in.

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Asia
5:28 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Japan Revisits Its Official Pacifist Policy

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On the morning of Christmas Eve, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

One legacy of World War II is found in Japan's constitution. It bans that country from having a military force. But now Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has proposed a tough new national security strategy which is raising some questions about Japan's intentions.

Tamzin Booth, the Tokyo bureau chief for The Economist, explained to us what's behind the new plan.

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Sports
5:22 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Berlin Cheers On Former East German Soccer Team

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

For people in Germany, Christmas means evergreens, "Silent Night" and mulled wine. In the city of Berlin, Christmas also means celebrating a scrappy group of athletes. The FC Union soccer team was formed by iron workers more than a century ago. During the Cold War, it became a symbol of resistance against the East German government. These days, despite mixed results on the field, FC Union remains a fan favorite.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson sent this postcard from a game over the weekend.

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Africa
5:18 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Power Struggle Fuels Violence In South Sudan

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Later today, the United Nations Security Council is expected to vote on sending thousands more peacekeeping troops to South Sudan. This is a country that the United States helped form in 2011.

And now a power struggle between the president and his former vice president has spiraled into violence along tribal lines. Hundreds of people have died and tens of thousands are displaced.

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Remembrances
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Alan Turing, Who Cracked War Code, Receives Posthumous Pardon

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The British government has issued a posthumous pardon for a man who helped win World War II for the allies. Alan Turing was a pioneering computer scientist and code breaker who helped crack Nazi Germany's enigma machine. He worked at Britain's legendary military intelligence headquarters at Bletchley Park.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

What Does The Future Hold For Climate Change?

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And in these last days of 2013 we've been having conversations about the future. Rather than grand predictions, we've been seeking a realistic assessment of what lies ahead. So far we've explored cybersecurity, we've looked at the changing electorate. When it comes to climate change, the topic for today, Andrew Steer of the World Resources Institute told my colleague Steve Inskeep that the trends don't look very good.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Administration Extends Health Insurance Deadline Again

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene with Steve Inskeep. There's a lot of last-minute shopping going on today. And that goes for health insurance, too. Yesterday was supposed to be the deadline to sign up on the government's new insurance website for coverage that begins January first.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Lead Designer Of World's Most Popular Firearm Dies

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

1947 was the year the most notorious weapon in history was born. That is the "Avtomat Kalashnikov" or AK-47. Today millions of them, maybe 100 million, are in use. The man who helped bring the weapon to the world - Mikhail Kalashnikov - has now died, at age 94. Joining me now is C. J. Chivers. He's a reporter for the New York Times and author of "The Gun," a book about the A-K-47. Chris, welcome back to the program. C. J., welcome back to the program.

C.J. CHIVERS: Thanks very much for having me.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Thousands Fall From Middle Class After RV Industry Collapse

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We're going to take a close look, now, at the human cost when an industry shuts down. Oregon has kept detailed records on what happened to thousands of people who lost their jobs when the state's RV manufacturing industry imploded during the recession. Since then, many workers dropped from middle wage to low wage earners, a trend playing out across the United States. Some fared even worse. NPR's Kelly McEvers when to Oregon to meet the people behind the numbers.

BRADLEY WARING: Entering Junction City, 5,460 people.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

USDA Grants Santa Special Livestock Permit

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. Our last word in business today - what else: Reindeer.

From Dasher to Prancer, Vixen to Cupid, and of course, Rudolph - all of Santa's reindeer have gotten the green light from the Agriculture Department to enter U.S. territory. It's very important. The USDA granted, quote, Mr. S. Claus a special livestock permit. And in the spirit of Christmas, the department even waived the normal application fees and disease testing requirement for his reindeer.

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