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It's All Politics
5:19 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

John Boehner Foe Targets 'Electile' Dysfunction

An erectile dysfunction ad isn't the kind of thing most politicians would typically gravitate toward.

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World Cafe
4:40 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

World Cafe Next: SACCO

SACCO.
Courtesy of the artist
  • SACCO On World Cafe: Next

This week's World Cafe: Next entry is a San Diego psych-rock band started by friends Andy Breihan and John Fredericks. After relocating to Brooklyn, the pair and drummer Chris Tromley recorded their debut within sight of the ocean on Long Island, just to maintain the surf-friendly San Diego vibe.

As for the name SACCO, that's a shout-out to the famous Italian anarchists Sacco and Vanzetti, who were executed in 1927. Hear and download two of the band's songs as part of the World Cafe: Next podcast.

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All Tech Considered
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Restaurants: The Modern-Day Lab For Our Smartphone-Obsessed Ways

Courtney Cranch tends bar at The Red Hen in Washington, D.C., where she estimates at least half her customers have smartphones out at mealtime.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 10:43 am

When we asked you about the changing norms for smartphone use in public spaces, hundreds of stories poured in.

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Planet Money
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

When The Wealthy Need Cash, Pawn Shops Can Be Appealing

This diamond necklace was pawned at New York Loan. It's for sale for $65,000.
Ashley Milne-Tyte NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 8:39 pm

Traditionally, pawn shops have been the last stop for people desperate for cash. But now there's a small but growing group of pawn shops for the wealthy.

Actor and model Regi Huc needed $75,000 in a hurry last year. He was making his first feature film, and needed to do re-shoots before the deadline to enter this year's film festivals.

On paper his finances look good. He owns some buildings in Philadelphia and has a stake in a family business, but he needed that money within a week. He didn't have the cash in his bank account. He didn't have time to apply for a loan.

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Theater
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Conflicting Tales Of A School Shooting In 'The Library'

In the new play The Library, Chloë Grace Moretz is a teen who survives a school shooting, only to discover she's been accused of aiding the shooter.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

The Library, a new play at New York's Public Theater, tackles an uncomfortable contemporary topic head on: It looks at the aftermath of a school shooting and peers into the shattered lives of the survivors, and the stories they tell. The play is written by Scott Z. Burns and directed by Steven Soderbergh, who've collaborated on three films; most recently, the thriller, Side Effects.

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Governing
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

New IRS Commisioner Grapples With Tumult And Tax Code

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

The last year has been rough for the IRS. Here are some numbers that helped tell the story. Three high-profile resignations of IRS officials, six ongoing investigations into the agency, and 150,000 public comments on a proposed IRS rule. That's a record. And all this goes back to a particular section of the tax code.

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Around the Nation
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Suspected Kansas Shooter Had Ties To KKK

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

The man suspected of killing three people at a Jewish community center and retirement home is a white supremacist formerly of the Ku Klux Klan. As Frank Morris of KCUR reports, 73-year-old Frazier Glen Cross once ran a paramilitary camp in North Carolina. Cross may have been planning the shooting for months.

News
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Nevada Ranch Dispute Ends As Feds Back Down — For Now

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

A standoff between federal agents and a Nevada rancher is over for now. Over the weekend, the Bureau of Land Management released about 400 head of cattle it had rounded up, fearing a violent confrontation. Militia members, including many with guns, had rallied in support of the rancher, Cliven Bundy, and his family. NPR's Ted Robbins has the story.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: No BLM. No BLM. No BLM.

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Space
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

For All You Need To Know About The Blood Moon, Ask Mr. Eclipse

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MOONDANCE")

VAN MORRISON: (Singing) Well, it's a marvelous night for a moon dance with the stars up above in your eyes.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

After Deaths, Renewed Focus On Leaky Gas Pipelines

A Philadelphia Gas Works employee replaces old steel and cast-iron pipes with new plastic pipes that are less likely to leak.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

After a gas explosion last month in New York leveled two buildings and killed eight people, an old issue received new attention: aging natural gas pipelines that leak.

It can take decades and billions of dollars to replace old steel and cast-iron pipes with plastic ones, but some utilities are making that a priority.

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News
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Defiant Of Deadline, Pro-Moscow Occupiers Persist

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. In eastern Ukraine, people are bracing for possible war. The government gave a deadline of this morning for pro-Russian separatists to lay down their weapons. Instead, the demonstrators took over still more government buildings in eastern Ukrainian cities. Ukraine's president has promised to send in the army to retake this region near the Russian border.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from the city of Donetsk.

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Europe
4:27 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Ukraine Looks Starkly Different On Russian TV — How Can This Be?

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Throughout the crisis in Ukraine, Russia's state-run news media have run intense coverage. They consistently portray the new government in Kiev as neo-Nazis who seized power in a violent coup, and the pro-Russian militants occupying government buildings in eastern Ukraine are shown as citizens set up and frightened by what they see as an illegitimate junta. NPR's Corey Flintoff is on the line with us now from Moscow. And Corey, first, just give us a picture here what the Russian people are hearing about the crisis in Ukraine.

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The Salt
4:19 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Passover Sandwich

In the time of Exodus, the Hebrews had to travel the desert without reading material.
NPR

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 8:06 am

Why is this Sandwich Monday different from all other Sandwich Mondays? In honor of Passover, I introduced my non-Jewish colleagues to the wonders of the Passover lunch.

It's not the Seder meal, but what I might have brought to school for lunch back in the 1970s, when the affluent Jews of suburban New Jersey ate tasteless food to remind themselves that thousands of years ago, they didn't have nice professional jobs like being a lawyer, or maybe a CPA. That's a steady living. I know David Birnbaum does nicely as an accountant; maybe you could look into that?

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The Two-Way
3:43 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Pulitzer Prizes Are Out: 'Washington Post,' 'The Guardian' Win For NSA Stories

Journalists Laura Poitras and Glenn Greenwald helped The Guardian win a Pulitzer Prize for public service along with The Washington Post Monday, for their stories based on NSA documents provided by Edward Snowden.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 12:07 pm

Months after lifting a veil of secrecy from the National Security Agency's surveillance operations, The Washington Post and The Guardian won a Pulitzer Prize for public service Monday. The two papers broke the story in tandem, relying on NSA documents provided by Edward Snowden.

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Monkey See
3:12 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

The Bitter Tundra Returns As 'Fargo' Comes To Television

Martin Freeman as Lester Nygaard in FX's Fargo.
Matthias Clamer FX

There are a lot of ways to adapt a film to a TV show, and it's not as common as it was for a while there. For a while, you had strange experiments like TV telling the story of Ferris Bueller, TV telling the story of Baby and Johnny from Dirty Dancing, and TV revisiting 9 to 5. Usually, it meant just moving the characters over to a series, having them played by new actors, and following new stories about them. (Melora Hardin as Baby Houseman!) Every now and then, it worked: you might have heard of M*A*S*H.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

What's Behind The Nasdaq Biotech Sell-Off

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 5:30 pm

Many on Wall Street are watching to see if last week’s massive sell-off of tech stocks will continue. Thursday saw the largest one-day sell-off in biotech stocks in over two years.

The Nasdaq fell 3 percent and on Friday it fell again. Many are nervous that we could be in the middle of a tech bubble.

Financial Times reporter Cardiff Garcia joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss what caused the sell-off.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Development Forces Out Pronghorn Antelope

A housing subdivision, a golf course and roads are named after the antelope that have been squeezed out by development. (Laurel Morales/Fronteras Desk)

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 5:30 pm

When we think of the American West, we picture wide open spaces. But roads, new homes and commercial buildings have cut across those spaces.

That development is having an impact on the pronghorn antelope, especially in one of the fastest-growing areas in the Southwest: Prescott Valley in northern Arizona.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Laurel Morales of Fronteras Desk reports.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

'Blood Moon' Begins Series Of Lunar Eclipses

Path of the Moon through Earth's umbral and penumbral shadows during the Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15, 2014. (Fred Espenak via NASA.gov)

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 5:30 pm

Stargazers are in for a treat if they’re willing to stay up late tonight. A rare lunar eclipse known as a blood-moon will begin tomorrow morning at about 2 a.m. Eastern time. The full eclipse will last from about 3 a.m. to 4:30 a.m.

Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky & Telescope magazine joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the phenomenon, which is part of a “tetrad,” and the best time to watch.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

How To Start Conversations With Total Strangers

Rob Baedeker and Chris Colin are the authors of "What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss's Boss." (Ilana Diamond)

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 5:30 pm

Have you ever gone up to an intriguing looking person at a party, tried to start a conversation and froze? Or perhaps you just babbled mundanely about the weather? Well, authors Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker can help.

Along with illustrator Tony Millionaire, they’ve published “What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss’s Boss” (excerpt below).

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Shots - Health News
2:55 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Why Babies Cry At Night

More than just hungry or wet?
George Marks Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 2:07 pm

Somewhere between bliss and exhaustion. That's how the first few months of parenting often feel, as sleepless nights blur into semicomatose days.

Most of us chalk up a baby's nighttime crying to one simple fact: He's hungry.

But could that chubby bundle of joy have a devious plan?

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