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Law
5:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Jury To Decide James 'Whitey' Bulger Case

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

Federal prosecutors and defense attorneys gave their closing arguments on Monday. One side calling Bulger vicious and violent — the other calling the government systematically corrupt. The former south Boston mob boss is accused of a rash of crimes including 19 murders.

Business
5:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Bezos Tells 'Post' Employees He Shares Paper's Values

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

The world of newspapers was rocked Monday by news that Jeff Bezos, the founder and CEO of Amazon.com, is buying The Washington Post for $250 million. Bezos' purchase of the paper will bring to an end its association with the Graham family, which bought the Post in 1933.

Business
5:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Jeff Bezos To Buy 'Washington Post' From Graham Family

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. This morning, The Washington Post is in its own headlines. The Graham family, which controlled the Post for eight decades, is selling the flagship paper. Here's Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, in a Post-TV video talking about the sale.

(SOUNDBITE OF POST-TV VIDEO)

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First Listen
4:22 am
Tue August 6, 2013

First Listen: Typhoon, 'White Lighter'

Typhoon's new album, White Lighter, comes out August 20.
Jaclyn Campanaro Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 12:13 pm

Kyle Morton writes songs for Typhoon as if they were the last works he might ever create. His band is big by rock standards, with somewhere in the neighborhood of a dozen members playing mighty, powerful songs whose instrumentation conveys big, bold joy. But underneath it all are the words of a young man living on what he feels is borrowed time.

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Around the Nation
3:49 am
Tue August 6, 2013

With Budgets Tight, Small Towns Go Without Courthouses

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

In the small town of Coalinga, Calif., on the corner of 6th and Elm streets, the Fresno County Superior Court's old courthouse is still. Inside, veteran police Lt. Darren Blevins gestures inside an empty courtroom.

"In the past, when we actually had court in here, over on this wall here was the seating for the inmates or the people that were held in custody," he says.

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Economy
3:30 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Ski Resorts Find Ways To Stay Busy When There's No Snow

In the summer, Snowmass ski resort in Colorado rents bikes instead of skis. It's an effort to create year-round revenue during a time when most ski resorts are closed.
Jeremy Swanson Aspen/Snowmass

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:50 am

With sizzling temperatures in much of the country, tourists are turning to mountain ski resorts to find relief. Resorts from Colorado to California and Oregon are on track to set a record this year for summer business.

Brandon Wilke is spending a long weekend at a resort just down the road from Aspen, Colo. He came for a wedding, but Wilke and his brother-in-law decided to bring their mountain bikes and try out some bike trails at the Snowmass ski resort. At first, Wilke says he didn't know mountain biking was an option.

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It's All Politics
3:29 am
Tue August 6, 2013

On The Road With Max And Dave: A Tax Overhaul Tour

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., (center) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., (right) speak about overhauling the tax code at the 3M Innovation Center in Maplewood, Minn., on July 8.
Hannah Foslien AP

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 9:18 am

Ask Americans about the most pressing concerns for the nation, and overhauling the tax code probably isn't all that high on the list — that is, unless those Americans happen to be Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., and Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., the chairmen of the congressional tax-writing committees.

The two lawmakers are on a mission to simplify the tax code.

When they're out on the road selling that tax overhaul, they don't wear ties and they skip much of the formality of Washington — like last names even. Just call them Max and Dave.

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Around the Nation
3:29 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Dredging South Carolina's Rivers For Long-Forgotten Timber

Louis Marcell and Adam Jones prepare to search for old logs, known as sinker wood, on the bottom of Ashley River near Charleston, S.C. They use sonar and a book of old train lines to find the timber, some of which has been preserved in the mud since the 1800s.
Noam Eshel

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 12:56 pm

On the Ashley River, a few miles south of Charleston, S.C., the water is murky and the marsh grass high. A three-man logging crew is cruising on a 24-foot pontoon boat. It's low tide and logs are poking out everywhere.

Hewitt Emerson, owner of the Charleston-based reclaimed wood company Heartwood South, is in charge. He's going to an old saw mill site, but won't say exactly where. He's heading to Blackbeard's Creek, he says, as in pirate Blackbeard — the early 18th century scourge of the seas.

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Poetry
3:26 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Pinsky's 'Singing School': Poetry For The Verse Averse

Robert Pinsky served as the United States Poet Laureate from 1997 to 2000.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

For Robert Pinsky, the pleasure in poetry comes from the music of the language, and not from the meaning of the words. So he put together an anthology of 80 poems that are models by master poets -- from Sappho to Allen Ginsberg, Shakespeare to Emily Dickinson.

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The Two-Way
2:26 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Court-Martial To Begin Tuesday In Fort Hood Shooting Rampage

Maj. Nidal Hasan faces 13 charges of murder and 32 of attempted murder for the November 2009 shootings at Fort Hood, Texas.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:59 am

Former Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged with opening fire in a troop processing center at Fort Hood, Texas, and killing 13 people and wounding more than 30 others in 2009.

Hasan is representing himself in the death penalty case.

NPR's Wade Goodwyn tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne that means Hasan will be questioning witnesses he is accused of shooting.

Hassan is paralyzed from the waist down after being shot by a military police officer during the rampage.

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All Tech Considered
7:06 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

In Bezos' Purchase Of 'Post,' Tech And Media Keep Melding

Jeff Bezos, a tech titan and Amazon founder, purchased a venerable newspaper, The Washington Post.
Richard Brain Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 11:46 am

The news spread with the speed of the Internet: The Washington Post, a newspaper that helped bring down a president, would be sold to Jeff Bezos, the tech titan who started Amazon.

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All Tech Considered
6:54 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Trade Case Puts Apple In Washington's Sights

The U.S. Trade Representative has overturned a ban on the import of the iPhone 4 and the iPad 2.
David Paul Morris Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 7:08 pm

Apple has been notoriously disinterested in Washington politics. But two decisions coming from the Obama administration in the past few days indicate that Washington is increasingly interested in Apple.

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This Is NPR
6:14 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

NPR In The News: Kelly McEvers Reports On Egypt

NPR Correspondent Kelly McEvers on Andrea Mitchell Reports from MSNBC.
msnbc.com screen grab

With ongoing tension between Egypt's military-backed interim government and supporters of former President Mohamed Morsi, the international community is stepping in to mediate. Just today, Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham traveled to Egypt, the latest U.S. officials to visit the region.

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All Tech Considered
6:06 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Special Ops Envisions 'Iron Man'-Like Suit To Protect Troops

Concept art of the suit the Special Operations Command is trying to build.
Raytheon via YouTube

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

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Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Harsh In Hard Times? A Gene May Influence Mom's Behavior

A gene known as DRD2 affects the brain's dopamine system and is known to be associated with aggressive behavior.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 7:51 am

A gene that affects the brain's dopamine system appears to have influenced mothers' behavior during a recent economic downturn, researchers say.

At the beginning of the recession that began in 2007, mothers with the "sensitive" version of a gene called DRD2 became more likely to strike or scream at their children, the researchers say. Mothers with the other "insensitive" version of the gene didn't change their behavior.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
5:51 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Boz Scaggs On Piano Jazz

Boz Scaggs.
Courtesy of the artist

On this episode of Piano Jazz, singer-songwriter and guitarist Boz Scaggs performs a few standards in a program that originally aired in 2004.

Scaggs met future rock star and classic-rock staple Steve Miller while the two were attending prep school in Texas. In 1959, Skaggs joined a group headed by Miller, beginning a musical association that lasted, on and off, into the late '60s.

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Newport Jazz Festival
5:38 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Live In Concert: Newport Jazz 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR
  • Dirty Dozen Brass Band At Newport

One of the original new-school New Orleans brass bands, a Dirty Dozen show guarantees a good time. This year actually marks three dozen years since the first incarnation of the group coalesced to resurrect a then-disappearing tradition — and infuse it with both bebop and funk. As with many a show since '77, there was dancing and handkerchief-waving aplenty, and several original members were present to anchor the proceedings.

Personnel

  • Roger Hayward Lewis, baritone and soprano saxophone
  • Kevin Harris, tenor saxophone
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Newport Jazz Festival
5:36 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Jim Hall Trio With Julian Lage, Live In Concert: Newport Jazz 2013

The Jim Hall Trio with Julian Lage performs at the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival.
Adam Kissick NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 12:44 pm

One of the finest guitar players in jazz history — who made all those classic records with Sonny Rollins, Bill Evans, Ron Carter and so on — is still at it at age 82. Fittingly, Jim Hall's rhythm section at Newport is top-shelf international caliber: Scott Colley (bass) and Lewis Nash (drums). And Julian Lage, a much younger guitar phenom, joined in a cross-generational confab of guitar heroes.

Personnel

  • Jim Hall, guitar
  • Scott Colley, bass
  • Lewis Nash, drums
  • Julian Lage, guitar

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The Two-Way
5:29 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

In Baseball, Punishments Often Come With An Asterisk

Despite already being in the Hall of Fame, New York Yankees legend Mickey Mantle was banned from baseball in 1983, for his work for a casino. He was reinstated in 1985. MLB suspended Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez for 211 regular season games Monday.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 8:01 pm

By suspending New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez for 211 regular-season games — through the end of the 2014 regular season — Major League Baseball stopped short of the lifetime ban that had been threatened.

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