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NPR Story
6:47 am
Sun August 4, 2013

New Dr. Who To Be Revealed Today

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 11:39 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC, "DR. WHO")

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

That music should instantly transport you to the realm of British sci-fi and the world of "Dr. Who." If it doesn't, then bear with us and listen closely. The cult BBC TV show, about a doctor who travels though time and space in a blue policeman's telephone booth, is 50 years old this year. Still with me?

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NPR Story
6:47 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Cash's Burning 'Ring Of Fire' Turns 50

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 11:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Love is a burning thing that makes a fiery ring. That, my friends, is musical poetry. OK, maybe not, but it is the opening line to one of Johnny Cash's biggest hits. "Ring of Fire" turns 50 years old this year.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RING OF FIRE")

JOHNNY CASH: (Singing) Love is a burning thing, and it makes a fiery ring.

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NPR Story
6:47 am
Sun August 4, 2013

When Comedians Cross Borders

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 11:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Comedy is something we tend to think of as universal. If a joke's funny, it's just funny, right? Not really. Turns out humor can be really culturally specific. And today, we're going to look at what happens when comedians try to cross over from one cultural to another. Our next guest has some experience with that. His name is Ryan Ha. He's a Chinese-American who lives in Beijing. And he is the CEO of something called Comedy Club China. He's joined us in our studios this morning. Hey, Ryan. Thanks for coming in.

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NPR Story
6:47 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Winging It:: How To Travel Alone

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 11:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's one thing to go out and explore a new city or a new country with your partner or a group of friends; quite another to take on this kind of adventure all by yourself.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: This week on our travel segment, Winging It, we discuss the art and science of traveling solo. Janice Waugh is the author of "The Solo Traveler's Handbook."

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Music Interviews
5:39 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Violinist Amanda Shires Picks Up The Pieces

Amanda Shires' new album is called Down Fell the Doves.
Jimmy Collins Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:38 pm

When country violinist Amanda Shires goes on tour, she meets a lot of interesting people. Once after a show in Tampa, Florida, a fellow calling himself Tiger Bill handed her a mysterious bag — whose contents, he said, would make her "bulletproof."

"And I opened it and looked inside of it," Shires recalls. "And it was whiskers and claws and teeth and fur."

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My Guilty Pleasure
5:35 am
Sun August 4, 2013

'The Moonstone' Is A Hidden Gem Of A Detective Novel

Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni's latest book is Oleander Girl.

I was about 12 when I first encountered The Moonstone — or a Classics Illustrated version of it — digging through an old trunk in my grandfather's house on a rainy Bengali afternoon. I loved the Classics Illustrated series (the graphic novels of my youth that simplified famous novels for children), presenting us with swashbuckling plotlines, and heroes and villains that were unmistakably, unashamedly, what they were supposed to be.

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The Two-Way
5:16 am
Sun August 4, 2013

U.S. Men's Soccer Is On A Roll — All The Way To Rio?

Members of the U.S. men's soccer team take a lap around the field after beating Panama 1-0 to capture the CONCACAF Gold Cup on Sunday in Chicago.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 2:55 pm

At the beginning of 2013 — with only a year before soccer's crown jewel event, the World Cup in Brazil — all was not rosy with the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team. There was that 0-0 tie with Canada, and then a 2-1 loss to Honduras in a World Cup qualifier.

But now, the cry is, "Break up the Americans!"

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Music Interviews
5:15 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Heartache Gives KT Tunstall's New Album A Split Personality

KT Tunstall's album Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon was recorded in two sessions, which fell on either side of a life-changing summer for the singer.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 11:39 am

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Music Interviews
4:46 am
Sun August 4, 2013

'The Weatherman': A Rambler's Folky Manifesto

Gregory Alan Isakov's latest album is called The Weatherman.
Erin Preston Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:16 pm

To be a folk musician these days, there's no requirement that you be some sort of rambling wanderer. But it can't hurt, right?

Gregory Alan Isakov was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. He didn't stay there long: He moved to Philadelphia, then around the East Coast, switching schools every couple years. As an adult, he's found a more stable home: a remote part of Colorado. And in his music, he writes from the perspective quite happy to be away from any big cities.

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Sunday Puzzle
4:44 am
Sun August 4, 2013

First Names First

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 1:39 pm

On-air challenge: This week's puzzle is called "What's in a Name?" Every answer consists of the names of two famous people. The last name of the first person is an anagram of the first name of the last person. Given the non-anagram parts of the names, you identify the people. For example, given "Madeleine" and "Aaron," you would say "Kahn" and "Hank."

Last week's challenge: In three words, name a product sold mainly to women that has the initials N-P-R. The answer is a common phrase.

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All Tech Considered
4:44 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Digital Seen Surpassing TV In Capturing Our Time

A study shows digital media consumption will surpass TV viewing for the first time this year.
iStockphoto.com

It's finally happening, folks. This year, the average time Americans spend with digital media each day will surpass traditional TV viewing time. That's according to eMarketer's latest estimate of media consumption among adults.

The average adult will spend more than five hours per day online and on non-voice mobile activities (read: texting, apps, games). That's compared to an average four hours and 31 minutes each day of TV watching.

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Afghanistan
3:58 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Regimental Combat Team 7 Rolls Up Its Flag In Afghanistan

Regimental Combat Team 7 cases its flag during their mission's closing ceremony in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 2:42 pm

At the peak of fighting in Afghanistan's Helmand Province, there were 20,000 Marines battling the Taliban. Now there are 8,000 — and more are heading home every month.

Among the latest to pack up was Regimental Combat Team 7.

At their mission's recent closing ceremony, several hundred Marines gathered in the scorching desert heat at Camp Leatherneck in Helmand Province. Their tan, pixelated fatigues blended in amidst the vast expanse of sand-colored tents and buildings of the largest Marine base in Afghanistan.

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U.S.
6:29 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Online And Anonymous: New Challenges To Prosecuting Sex Trafficking

John Ryan, CEO of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, speaks during a press conference about a child sex trafficking operation on Monday in Washington.
Brendan Smialows AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 1:50 pm

Monday, the FBI announced the success of a three-day, multicity child sex trafficking operation. The seventh and largest of its kind, the raid recovered 106 teenagers and arrested 152 pimps. Aged 13 to 17, almost all of the young people found were girls.

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Arts & Life
6:29 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Bespoke Suits And Perfect Cravats At 'Dandy' Exhibit

Sartorial Anarchy #5, 2012. Ike Ude, photographer. In his Sartorial Anarchy self-portraits, New York-based Nigerian-born artist Ike Ude creates composite images of the dandy across geography and chronology. Ude photographs himself in disparate ensembles, pairing, for example, a copy of an 18th-century Macaroni wig with other carefully selected vintage garments and reproductions.
Courtesy of Leila Heller Gallery Ike Ude

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 10:43 am

When you hear the word dandy, what do you think of?

Maybe the song "Yankee Doodle Dandy," which dates all the way back to the Revolutionary War, and compares the colonists to foppish, effeminate idiots: the dandies.

But a summer exhibit at the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, closing Aug. 18, aims to reclaim the term. It explores dandyism through the ages, linking to the cutting edge of men's fashion and style. The name of the show is "Artist, Rebel, Dandy: Men of Fashion" — which does still leave you wondering what you might see.

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Movie Interviews
6:01 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Robert Klein And The Golden Age Of Comedy

Robert Klein
International Film Circuit

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 6:29 pm

When Robert Klein was a busboy in the Catskills, he saw the best Jewish comedians of the day. From Rodney Dangerfield and Mel Brooks, to comedy in its modern form, Klein was there to see the evolution of what makes us laugh. It made him the perfect person to narrate the documentary that opened this week in New York City, When Comedy Went to School. It's a look back at how many famous comedians got their start by spending their summers in the Catskill Mountains of upstate New York.

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Music
6:00 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

The Biggest Thing Out Of Thailand: An Elephant Orchestra

Thai Elephant Orchestra co-founder David Sulzer (bottom center, in red) poses with the animals and their mahouts, or keepers.
Jerry Alexander Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 3:01 pm

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National Security
5:26 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Week In News: Terror Alert

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 6:29 pm

The U.S. State Department issued a warning to Americans traveling abroad this weekend, as well as to many embassies and consulates, that it has learned of the possibility of a terrorist attack. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic.

Race
5:26 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Preserving African-American Cemeteries

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 6:29 pm

Under a popular park in Washington, D.C., there is a 19th century burial ground that was once the largest African-American cemetery in the city. Advocates want to protect the park from further development and create space for a memorial. But how many other such burial grounds are in similar straits, and how have others solved the problem of co-existing with development and gentrification?

Sports
4:59 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

How Major League Baseball Alleviated Its Broken Bat Problem

Yasiel Puig of the Los Angeles Dodgers breaks his bat on a single to right field during a game in June. The rate of such breaks has been cut in half since 2008.
Victor Decolongon Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 6:29 pm

Back in 2008, Major League Baseball had a problem with broken bats. That season, bats were breaking into multiple pieces at a higher rate than ever before: around once per game.

The problem coincided with a surge in the popularity of maple bats over the traditional ash.

A bat that simply cracks isn't too big a deal. But in 2008, maple bats kept breaking apart. Often, they'd break along the handle, sending the heavier upper barrel of the bat flying.

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Newport Folk Festival
4:45 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

The Lumineers, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2013

The Lumineers performs at the 2013 Newport Folk Festival.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 8:31 pm

The Lumineers may have on the pop scene out of nowhere — scoring a worldwide hit with the band's self-titled 2012 debut album and its multimillion-selling single "Ho Hey" — but the Denver group had tooled around in obscurity for quite a few years before its breakthrough. These days, though, it's one of the biggest folk-rock outfits in the business, joining a suspenders-clad Mount Rushmore with the likes of Mumford & Sons.

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