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NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Zimbabwean Author On Mugabe's Quest To Hold On To Power

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Renee Montagne talks with Zimbabwean author Peter Godwin about Zimbabwe's presidential election and Robert Mugabe's quest to continue his grip on power.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Zimbabweans To Cast Ballots In Presidential Race

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. People in Zimbabwe are voting today in a presidential election that features an incumbent who's been in office for 33 years. President Robert Mugabe is now 89 and has been in office since he led a rebellion freeing Zimbabwe from colonialism.

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Spanish-Language Radio Star Yanked Off The Air

A week after Eddie "Piolín" Sotelo's show was canceled, allegations of sexual harassment have surfaced.
Valerie Macon Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:49 pm

Last week, the Univision Radio network suddenly canceled its popular, nationally syndicated morning show, Piolín Por La Mañana, hosted by Eddie Sotelo. Sotelo is known as 'Piolín,' or 'Tweety Bird' in Spanish, and his irreverent program was once the top radio program in Los Angeles.

For seven hours each weekday morning, Sotelo cracked silly jokes and double entendres, played Mexican regional music and sometimes got political.

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NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

A Look Back At The Manning Trial

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Bradley Manning was found guilty of espionage but acquitted of the most serious charge against him, aiding the enemy. Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Arun Rath about the significance of the verdict. He has covered the proceedings since they began.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Manning Faces Sentencing In Leak Case

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Bradley Manning has been found guilty in the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history. A military judge convicted Manning of violating the Espionage Act and stealing government property. But he was acquitted on the most serious charge he faced: aiding the enemy. The sentencing phase of his trial begins Wednesday.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

'Cronut' Often Imitated, But Can It Be Duplicated?

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

The cronut — a hybrid of a croissant and doughnut — was invented at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in Manhattan. Now, it's inspiring imitators. The doughnut with flaky layers is being made around the world from Japan to Australia and the U.K. Even Dunkin' Donuts is getting into the game. The news site Quartz reports that in South Korea, Dunkin' is offering a version it's calling "New York Pie Donuts."

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Oprah's TV Channel Says It's In The Black

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

More than two years after it started, OWN, the cable channel that is a partnership between Oprah Winfrey and Discovery Communications, announced it is turning a profit.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

House Expected To Vote On Student Loan Deal

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with hope for a student loan dean.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

2016 May Seem Just Around The Corner For Political Rivals

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

With a public battle between two likely Republican presidential contenders, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, and a private meeting between possible Democratic rivals Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden, it feels like 2016 is just around the corner. The two parties are already aligning themselves for a presidential race that's still three years away.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Obama Offers 'Grand Bargain' On Corporate Taxes

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama is offering Congress what he describes as a grand bargain on corporate taxes. He laid out the terms in Chattanooga, Tennessee yesterday on the latest stop of his national economic speaking tour.

NPR's Ari Shapiro was on the trip.

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Business
3:33 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Ford Taking America's Best-Selling Truck All 'Natural'

A version of Ford's flagship F-150 pickup truck that runs on natural gas.
Courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

The reigning king in the truck world is the Ford F-150, and it's been that way for a couple of decades. But staying on top is getting harder.

With new, tougher fuel standards looming there is a lot of emphasis on efficiency and innovation. On Wednesday, Ford is announcing its flagship truck is taking a step into the alternative fuel world with a vehicle that can run on natural gas.

When you look at their bottom lines and their advertising you realize that the Detroit Three make cars, but they're really truck companies, especially Ford.

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Sweetness And Light
3:33 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Why Would You Volunteer For Next Year's Super Bowl?

Super Bowl volunteer Ben Schreiber distributes fan guides to any of the thousands of people who may need them while visiting Indianapolis for Super Bowl XLVI festivities, in 2012.
Chad Ryan CSM /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 1:40 pm

I read the other day that 16,000 people have been recruited as volunteers for next year's Super Bowl in New Jersey, and suddenly it occurred to me: the Super Bowl is one of the great financial bonanzas of modern times. From the players to the networks to the hotels, everybody involved with it makes a killing. Why would anybody volunteer to work for free for the Super Bowl? Would you volunteer to work free for Netflix or Disneyworld?

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Sports
3:33 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Pickleball, Anyone? Senior Athletes Play New Games And Old

Hazel Trexler-Campbell throws spray-painted horseshoes during the Senior Games in Cleveland on July 23.
Benjamin Morris for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 11:23 am

A lot of what you'd see at the National Senior Games looks familiar if you've ever watched the Summer Olympics: There's track and field, basketball and swimming. At the Summer Olympics, however, you will not hear voices in the crowd cheering "Go, Grandma!"

Everyone at these games is over 50, and they play some sports that will likely never appear at the Olympics. Here's a sample:

Pickleball

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U.S.
3:12 am
Wed July 31, 2013

In Florida, A Clash Over Exhuming Bodies At Reform School

Metal crosses mark graves at the cemetery of the former Arthur Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Investigators in Florida using ground-penetrating radar and soil samples say there are nearly 100 unmarked graves on the grounds.
Michael Spooneybarger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:32 pm

Researchers at the University of South Florida are fighting with the state over access to the grounds of a now-closed reform school.

For decades, the Dozier School for Boys was notorious for the harsh treatment boys received there. Now, a forensic anthropologist and her team want permission to exhume dozens of bodies they found in unmarked graves, but are meeting resistance from state officials.

White House Boys

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The Salt
3:09 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Farm Laborers Get A Foothold With Their Own Organic Farms

Agricultural work, which is physically demanding, is also a risky business venture.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:01 pm

Northern California's Salinas Valley is often dubbed America's salad bowl. Large growers there have long relied on thousands of seasonal workers from rural Mexico to pick lettuce, spinach and celery from sunrise to sunset. Many of these workers seem destined for a life in the fields. But a program that helps field workers, like Raul Murillo, start their own farms and businesses is starting to yield a few success stories.

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Kitchen Window
12:03 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Buttermilk Makes Everything Taste A Little Better

T. Susan Chang for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:55 pm

It started happening about 15 years ago. I'd be paging through a new cookbook or browsing through recipes online, and I'd suddenly stop. "Mmm, buttermilk biscuits. Doesn't that sound good?" I'd bookmark the site or dog-ear the page. The next week I'd see a recipe for waffles — buttermilk waffles, as it happened. What a splendid idea. Out came the yellow stickies.

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Code Switch
6:41 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Harry Belafonte, Jay Z And Intergenerational Beef

Beyonce (left) and Jay Z arrive at a "Justice for Trayvon" rally in New York earlier this month.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:08 pm

Hip-hop beefs don't burn any slower or get any more bizarre.

Last year, Harry Belafonte, the acclaimed singer, actor and civil rights activist, was awkwardly quoted by a foreign reporter in a Q&A about modern celebrity and social responsibility. The always-outspoken Belafonte didn't really hold back.

Q: Are you happy with the image of members of minorities in Hollywood today?

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It's All Politics
6:32 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Immigration Issue Shows Big Money Doesn't Always Win In D.C.

The crowd cheers speaker Glenn Beck (not pictured) during a Tea Party rally to "Audit the IRS" in front of the U.S. Capitol on June 19.
Gary Cameron Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:17 pm

Big Money often gets what it wants in Washington. But not always.

In few policy debates is that more true than in the proposed overhaul of the nation's immigration laws.

The big donors and corporate leaders of the Republican establishment mostly favor remaking U.S. immigration laws to give those now here illegally an eventual door to citizenship and to increase the annual quota for guest workers.

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This Is NPR
6:29 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Mitch Hurwitz Loves NPR

Melissa Kuypers NPR

If you're anything like me, you probably spent some quality time with your Netflix account earlier this year when, after a seven-year hiatus, Arrested Development released an entire new season all at once. The whole Bluth family is back, along with much of the clever wordplay, subtle jokes that get better on repeat viewings and narration by Ron Howard fans have come to expect. This time, though, each family member gets their own episode. Mitch Hurwitz, who created the show, came in to talk to Fresh Air Host Terry Gross about the favorite dysfunctional family.

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The Salt
5:41 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Despite Legal Blow, New York To Keep Up Sugary Drink Fight

On Tuesday, a state appeals court called New York City's ban on supersized soda unconstitutional.
Allison Joyce Getty Images News

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:01 pm

A state appeals court on Tuesday rejected New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's attempt to limit the size of sugary beverages sold in his city. But in a statement, Bloomberg and the city's top lawyer, Michael Cardozo, called the decision a "temporary setback" and vowed to appeal.

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