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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

U.S. Is 'Through The Worst Of Yesterday's Winds,' Obama Says

President Obama during his address Wednesday at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:26 pm

President Obama on Wednesday launched another effort to lay out his vision for how to strengthen the U.S. economy with a midday speech at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., in which he hit themes familiar to those who followed his 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns.

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The Salt
1:02 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Chow Down In Sync With Your Circadian Clock

The time of day you eat really does make a difference when it comes to health outcomes.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 3:34 pm

We've already nudged you this week about the benefits of breakfast. And this got us thinking more about the timing of our meals.

There's a growing body of evidence to suggest that when we eat during a 24-hour cycle is likely more important for our health than we realized.

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Author Interviews
1:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

After WWII, Europe Was A 'Savage Continent' Of Devastation

In his latest book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe takes a look at Europe in the years directly following World War II.
Picador

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:59 pm

In the introduction to his book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe writes:

Imagine a world without institutions. No governments. No school or universities. No access to any information. No banks. Money no longer has any worth. There are no shops, because no one has anything to sell. Law and order are virtually non-existent because there is no police force and no judiciary. Men with weapons roam the streets taking what they want. Women of all classes and ages prostitute themselves for food and protection.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:28 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

The World's Oldest Known Calendar Discovered In Scotland

The moon is one of the most obvious natural indicators that the passing of time follows a pattern and can be tracked in a useful way.
Bill McKelvie iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 1:11 pm

In general terms, there are two eras that characterize the 200,000 years or so of human presence on Earth: first, and for most of this time, the hunter-gatherers, nomadic groups that roamed the land in search of food and shelter. Then came what we call "civilization," product of the fixation of larger groups around fertile areas. Presumably, the first were the Natufians some time around 10,000 BCE, along the swath of land between Israel and Jordan.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Sales Of New Homes Rise Again, Hit Five-Year High

A new home that was under construction earlier this year in San Mateo, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 1:35 pm

Note added on Aug. 23, 2013: When we wrote this post and its headline — "Sales Of New Homes Rise Again, Hit Five-Year High" — the data said that was true. Now, the agencies that produce the numbers have issued revisions that indicate sales of new homes in June were the second-best in the last five years. Go here to read about that.

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All Tech Considered
12:08 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Finland-Based Startup Will Let You 'Pay With Your Face'

Outside of a John Woo film like Face/Off, starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage, it's nearly impossible for someone to steal your face.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:46 pm

In our "Weekly Innovation" blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Previously we featured the sink-urinal and Smart Bedding.

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The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Delivery Of F-16s To Egypt Halted, Pentagon Says

President Obama is halting the delivery of F-16 fighter jets to Egypt for an undetermined period due to the "current situation" on the ground there, the Pentagon said Wednesday. (Via Reuters)

The Associated Press adds that while the delivery of the jets has been delayed, an "annual military exercise with Egypt is still on."

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Wed July 24, 2013

'Left Alone,' Oliver Mtukudzi Sees Music As Therapy

Liam Lynch Rock Paper Scissors

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 9:20 am

Zimbabwean musician Oliver Mtukudzi will be 61 this year, and his latest album, Sarawoga, is his 61st.

It is also, perhaps, his most personal. Sarawoga, which means "left alone," is a poignant response to the death of his son Sam in 2010.

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Immigration Path Too Slow To Follow The Rules?

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Oliver "Tuku" Mtukudzi is a legend, not just in his native Zimbabwe, but all over the world. He's 60 years old and he's now put out more albums than he's had birthdays. He joins us in studio for a very special performance chat. He'll talk about the tragedy that inspired his latest album and he'll play some songs for us, as well. That's in just a few minutes. But first, we want to continue this discussion about immigration.

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NPR Story
11:46 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Jorge Ramos On Latinos And The Future Of U.S. Politics

Univision newscaster Jorge Ramos anchors Noticiero Univision, the top-ranked newscast on Spanish-language TV.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:16 pm

Jorge Ramos anchors the top-ranked newscast on Spanish-language TV, Noticiero Univision, alongside Maria Elena Salinas. Sometimes called "the Spanish-language Walter Cronkite," Ramos has been a vocal — and influential — proponent of an immigration overhaul. (In recent summers, Ramos' network Univision has topped the prime-time TV ratings for all networks in the U.S.

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Parallels
11:45 am
Wed July 24, 2013

The Radical Brazilian Priest Who Was Excommunicated

Roberto Francisco Daniel, widely known as Padre Beto, was excommunicated by the Catholic Church for his views on gay marriage and other hot-button issues. The former priest says the church must adapt to a changing world.
Denise Guimaraes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:36 pm

His name is Roberto Francisco Daniel, but he goes by Padre Beto. He sports an ear clip, and a rosary around his neck that dips into an open-necked patterned shirt. In short, Padre Beto looks cooler than your typical priest.

His decision to become a Catholic priest came late, he says. He was 28. He'd been to college, worked, and he wasn't a virgin. He says he thinks that's why he has a different way of looking at church doctrine.

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Shots - Health News
11:27 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Menthol: Great In Aftershave, Not So Much In Cigarettes

Newport is the most popular menthol cigarette in the United States. Sales of menthols has increased though cigarette sales are declining overall.
Paul Sakuma Associated Press

Menthol gives cough drops, lip balm and other drugstore remedies that cool minty taste and slight numbing quality. Now the Food and Drug Administration has taken a long-awaited step toward saying that in cigarettes, those same qualities do more harm than good.

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The Salt
11:18 am
Wed July 24, 2013

NYC Doctors Are Now Prescribing Fruits And Veggies

Take two of these and call me in the morning.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:22 pm

Doctors typically give patients prescriptions for medications. But a new program in New York City has doctors prescribing fruits and vegetables to obese or overweight patients.

Deputy Mayor Linda Gibbs and Health Commissioner Thomas Farley launched the Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program Tuesday. It aims to give at-risk families greater access to healthy foods.

Under the program, obese or overweight patients can be prescribed Health Bucks redeemable for produce at local farmers markets.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Culture War Cookbook, With Soup Recipes

Ed Markey and his wife, Dr. Susan Blumenthal, contribute a recipe called Mass-paragus Soup.
Winslow Townson AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 1:11 pm

Sometimes it feels like this country is so torn apart by political partisanship that people from the two major parties just cannot agree on anything — including food.

In an attempt to find commonalities, we are putting together recipes for a Culture War Cookbook. If folks from both sides of the aisle can sidle up to a table together and appreciate each other's victuals, maybe they can eventually learn to appreciate each other's viewpoints.

Rather than stew about them.

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Monkey See
11:04 am
Wed July 24, 2013

A Comic-Con Diary: The Eisner Awards

The 2013 Eisner Awards conclude with Chip Kidd planting one on Neil Gaiman over the jealous protestations of Jonathan Ross.
Maggie Thompson

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:04 pm

Monkey See contributor/longtime nerd Glen Weldon recently attended San Diego Comic-Con. He kept a diary during one of the largest media events in the world.

8:28 p.m.: Jennifer and Matthew Holm are an adorable brother-sister team. They are standing at a podium less than 6 feet away from me and thanking their publisher, because their charming book, Babymouse for President, has just won the Eisner for Best Publication for Early Readers.

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Monkey See
11:03 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Welcome To The Television Critics Association Press Tour

iStockphoto.com

For the next two-plus weeks, I'll be in California, hearing all about the next six months in television. It's the annual press tour of the Television Critics Association, and it's always a combination of interesting discussions, weird little stories, and increasingly punchy critics.

You can see, for instance, all of last year's coverage here.

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The Two-Way
10:56 am
Wed July 24, 2013

'Cubicle Guy' Pops Up: Weiner News Conference Made Him A Star

A New York radio reporter's brush with Internet fame led news outlets to set the "cubicle guy" story to music. This is a screen image from The Daily Beast's humorous take on the news.
TheDailyBeastVideo

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:32 pm

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Business
10:43 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Boeing Is Flying High With Latest Earnings

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Boeing flying high.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The aircraft maker says its latest quarterly earnings rose a surprising 13 percent this quarter, despite all the troubles with the new 787 Dreamliner. Boeing said today revenues were up due to increased sales of its commercial jets, including Dreamliners and 737s.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:39 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Symphonic Music, American Style: 3 Must-Hear Albums

BMOP Sound

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:01 pm

Throughout the summer we're searching for the "Great American Symphony." It's not exactly a popularity contest. Instead, we're pondering American symphonic music from both the past and the present. Some composers like the young Kevin Puts and the veteran Martin Boykan, are labeling their pieces as symphonies. Others, like Michael Daugherty, can prefer more playful titles.

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The Record
9:54 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Bruno Mars Is More Than Your Average Pop Star

Just One Of The Guys: Bruno Mars (center, with microphone) performs with his band at Key Arena in Seattle, Washington on July 21.
Mat Hayward Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 7:37 am

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