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7:03 am
Mon July 22, 2013

July 22-28: 'Sinners,' Nazis And Student Radicals

Mario Savio, shown here at a victory rally in the University of California, Berkeley's Sproul Plaza on Dec. 9, 1964, was the face of the free speech movement.
AP

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
7:03 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Hidden Gems: 5 Summer Books That Deserve More Fanfare

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:04 pm

In the old days, when a book came out it just had to compete with other books. But these days a book has to compete not only with other books, but also with blog posts and tweets and tumblrs and everything else in written form. There's only so much that readers feel like reading, and as a result, every year many good books get lost under a tide of prose.

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Sports
6:44 am
Mon July 22, 2013

In The Tour De France, Even The Loser Is A Winner

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The winner of the Tour de France gets a yellow jersey but let's focus now on the lanterne rouge. That's the term for the guy who finishes last. It translates to red lantern, like that found on the caboose of a train. Yesterday, 36-year-old Canadian Svein Tuft took the honor with his 169th place finish. It turns out that the lanterne rouge is hotly contested. Just finishing brings glory and lucrative appearances. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Royal Arrival: It's A Boy!

Crowds of tourists gather on the steps of the Queen Victoria Memorial Statue outside Buckingham Palace in central London on Monday.
Justin Tallis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 6:55 pm

The Duchess of Cambridge, better known to most of the world as the former Kate Middleton, has given birth to a baby boy, the crown announced in a press release.

The baby was born at 4:24 p.m., London time on Monday, and weighed 8 pounds 6 ounces. The baby, whose name we still don't know, is third in line for the throne.

The announcement continues:

"The Duke of Cambridge [Prince William] was present for the birth.

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World
6:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Septuagenarian Superhero? Man Lifts Car Off Son-In-Law

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with a tale of neither a bird nor a plane. Cecil Stuckless was fixing a Jeep in Salvage, Newfoundland with his son-in-law, who was working under the car. Stuckless told the CBC he was getting a tool when the car suddenly fell. He summoned all his strength and lifted the Jeep just enough to save his son-in-law. Impressive for anybody, let alone a 72-year-old.

Asked if he was Superman, Cecil said: No, I'm not super. I just did what I could.

Asia
5:21 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Police Hunt For Principal After Indian School Lunch Deaths

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In India, the families of the children poisoned to death by a school lunch are still reeling from that tragedy. There have been no arrests since 23 children died last week after authorities say they ingested a toxic insecticide.

As NPR's Julie McCarthy reports, the lack of police action has deepened the anguish and anger of parents already crushed under the weight of poverty.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Encore: The Many Musical Careers Of Katie Crutchfield

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 8:04 am

Alabama-born singer-songwriter Katie Crutchfield broke through to a bigger audience last year by releasing an aching, bare-bones solo album. Her follow-up album came out in March. (This story originally aired on Weekend Edition Sunday on June 23, 2013.)

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Energy Standards For Ceiling Fans Spin Up D.C. Debate

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 11:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In these dog days of summer, a ceiling fan still offers an inexpensive way to cool down - except maybe in the nation's capital, Washington, D.C., where a partisan battle is heating up over efficiency standards proposed by the Obama administration. The Energy Department is in the early stages of crafting new rules to encourage the spread of ceiling fans that use less electricity, but House Republicans want to put that idea on ice. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

State Abortion Laws Differ From Doctors In Defining 20 Weeks

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 10:30 am

Texas last week became the 12th state to ban most abortions after 20 weeks. But most of the state laws don't define 20 weeks the same way doctors do.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Iowa Could Pose Problem For GOP Outreach

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

While the GOP autopsy on the 2012 election talks explicitly about reaching out to women and minorities to expand the party, it does not get into detail about its Iowa problem. Specifically, the state GOP that begins the presidential nominating season is dominated by religious conservatives most resistant to a broader, more inclusive party message.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Week In Politics: Obama's Economic Speech

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Cokie Roberts about President Obama's planned economic speech in Illinois this week and other political news.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

London Bookseller Forgoes Big Profit On J.K. Rowling Book

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Speaking of pouring a drink, how about raising a glass to this bookseller. Today's last word in business is one generous retailer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We learned last week that J.K. Rowling - of Harry Potter fame - was also the hidden author of the crime novel "The Cuckoo's Calling." She had released it under the nom de plume, Robert Galbraith.

GREENE: After that was revealed, the price of a signed first edition immediately jumped to more than $1,500 on sites like eBay.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

GlaxoSmithKline Says Executives May Have Broken Chinese Laws

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

GlaxoSmithKline says that some of its executives appear to have violated Chinese laws. In response, the company is pledging changes in the way it operates — which would bring down the prices of some of its drugs in China. Chinese authorities accuse the company of bribing doctors and officials to boost sales and raise the price of medicines.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Mickelson Wins Golf's British Open

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Phil Mickelson has played some great rounds of golf in his Hall of Fame career. His greatest, he says though, came yesterday. At the not-so-young-age of 43, Mickelson, who's nicknamed Lefty, staged one dramatic comeback in the final round of the British Open and he won the tournament by three shots. The victory at Muirfield was his fifth major tournament title and the first-ever title at the British Open, which is known for its tricky courses.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

'Abenomics' Get Vote Of Confidence In Japan

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And after years of economic stagnation, Japan is experiencing growing confidence. And voters in Japan handed a big victory yesterday to the ruling party in parliamentary elections. The election gives Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his ambitious economic agenda known as Abenomics quite a boost. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Detroit's Assets Under Review Amid Crushing Debt

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Detroit last week became the biggest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy. And now we're learning about some of the tough decisions that may come with that. Assuming the filing goes forward, Detroit will have to figure out how to reduce billions of dollars of debt. Creditors will, of course, push for the most money they can get, which means they're eyeing some of the city's most treasured assets. Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek reports.

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Parallels
3:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Brazil's Evangelicals A Growing Force In Prayer, Politics

Evangelical Christians pray during the "March for Jesus" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 29, 2013.
Nelson Antoine AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:32 pm

Pope Francis arrives Monday evening in Rio de Janeiro for a weeklong visit celebrating World Youth Day. Hundreds of thousands of Catholics have made the pilgrimage to see the Argentine-born pontiff, and he is expected to receive a rapturous welcome.

Still, Pope Francis's visit comes at a delicate time for the church in Brazil. Catholicism — the nation's main religion — is facing a huge challenge from evangelicals.

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The Salt
3:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

New York Toasts Long-Awaited Revival Of Its Distilleries

Tuthilltown Spirits in New York makes a clear corn whiskey, and the first legal aged whiskey in the state since Prohibition, among other products.
Joel Rose/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 11:30 am

A century ago, New York could claim that much of its liquor was local, thanks to distilleries large and small that supplied a lot of the whiskey, gin and rum that kept New York City (and the rest of North America) lubricated. Then Prohibition arrived and the industry largely dried up, before trickling back to life in the 21st century.

Now, distillers in New York state are toasting a revival 80 years in the making.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
3:32 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Little Bighorn Tour Guide Brings Battle To Life

Seasonal Ranger Mike Donahue (right) discuses the Battle of Little Bighorn with Jon Jones atop Custer Hill.
Jim Kent NPR

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 12:04 pm

On a scorching hot summer afternoon along the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana, seasonal ranger Mike Donahue brings the historical Battle of Little Bighorn to life with remarkable enthusiasm and passion.

At a recent presentation, Donahue welcomes a crowd to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. "Why did it happen in the first place?" he asks during the presentation. "Because you had two peoples that really didn't understand or appreciate one another very well."

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Shots - Health News
3:31 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:07 pm

Not so long ago, most people thought that the only good microbe was a dead microbe.

But then scientists started to realize that even though some bugs can make us sick and even kill us, most don't.

In fact, in the past decade attitudes about the bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microbes living all over our bodies has almost completely turned around. Now scientists say that not only are those microbes often not harmful, we can't live without them.

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