Gregory Warner

Gregory Warner is NPR's East Africa Correspondent. His reports cover the diverse issues and voices of a region that is experiencing unparalleled economic growth as well as a rising threat of global terrorism. His coverage can be heard across NPR and NPR.org.

Before joining NPR, Warner was a senior reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, where he endeavored to make the economics of American health care vivid and engaging. He's used puppets to illustrate the effects of Internet diagnoses on the doctor-patient relationship. He composed a Suessian cartoon to explain why health care job growth policies can increase the national debt. His musical journey into the shadow world of medical coding won the 2012 Best News Feature award from the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Prior to Marketplace, Warner was a freelance radio producer reporting from conflict zones around the world. He climbed mountains with smugglers in Pakistan for This American Life, descended into illegal mineshafts in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Marketplace's "Working" series, and lugged his accordion across Afghanistan on the trail of the "Afghan Elvis" for NPR's Radiolab.

Warner's radio and multimedia work has won awards from Edward R Murrow, New York Festivals, AP, PRNDI, and a Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. He has twice won Best News Feature from the Third Coast International Audio Festival in 2009 and 2012.

Warner earned his degree in English at Yale University. He is conversant in Arabic.

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Africa
5:00 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

President Obama Addresses African Union In Ethiopia

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 2:09 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

President Obama addressed the African Union today in Ethiopia, the first U.S. president to speak to the continental body. He praised Africa's progress, but promised to keep pointing out lingering problems with human rights and democracy.

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Africa
4:32 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Obama Becomes First Sitting U.S. President To Visit Ethiopia

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 7:24 pm

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Africa
5:15 am
Mon July 27, 2015

Obama Talks Candidly About Flaws In Kenya's Society

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 8:11 am

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Africa
5:12 pm
Sat July 25, 2015

On A Visit To Kenya, Obama Addresses Fight Against Extremists

Originally published on Sun July 26, 2015 10:31 am

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Africa
4:28 pm
Fri July 24, 2015

Obama Embarks On First Trip To Kenya As President

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 9:04 pm

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Parallels
6:14 am
Fri July 24, 2015

Obama's Roots A Source Of Pride — And Discord — In Kenya

Workers finish installing a billboard showing Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta and President Barack Obama in downtown Nairobi a day before Obama's visit.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 6:05 pm

The billboard that President Obama will see when he exits the airport in Nairobi on Friday says: "Welcome Home, Mr. President."

Obama's Kenyan roots have been a source of pride, but at times a source of discord, too, in the land of his father's birth.

For example, when Barack Obama won the U.S. presidency in 2008, Kenyans were ecstatic. His victory was declared a national holiday.

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Goats and Soda
5:21 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Obama Thinks Solar Power Will Boost Kenya; Kenyans Aren't So Sure

Kenyan graffiti artist Bankslave created a mural of Barack Obama. The president himself will visit Kenya on Friday. One of the president's agenda items is to promote solar power.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 11:15 am

When Jackline Mumbua decided to go solar, she knew the cost would be steep. The 35-year-old housewife in Machakos, Kenya, can barely cover the expenses of raising three school-age children on the little money her husband earns driving a motorcycle taxi. They have no savings. It took her family nearly two years to pay, in monthly installments, the $55 for a small rooftop solar panel.

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Parallels
1:22 pm
Tue July 7, 2015

Above The Law, A Militia Threatens To Push Burundi To The Brink

Burundi's President Pierre Nkurunziza walks with military officials during the country's Independence Day on Wednesday. Despite criticism at home and abroad, the president is defying a two-term limit and running for a third term in an election set for the middle of July.
Berthier Mugiraneza AP

Originally published on Wed July 8, 2015 6:34 pm

A quiet street in Burundi's capital can change in an instant. In recent months, antigovernment protesters in this tiny, east African country have developed a flash mob approach to demonstrations, rapidly convening and dispersing. An hour later, all that's left are shuttered kiosks, tossed bricks and the odor of burned tires in the air.

Activists are taking this approach because they say at least 70 people have been killed in protests in the past two months. Their attackers usually wear police uniforms, but few believe the killers are really police.

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Movies
5:22 pm
Sun July 5, 2015

Out Of Broken English, A Film Crafts A Call For Classroom Repairs

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 10:11 pm

Three high school students in Zanzibar have won a prize for a film that tackles a fierce debate in African classrooms: Should the teacher speak in English or the mother tongue? (This piece originally aired June 25, 2015 on Morning Edition.)

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Africa
5:12 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

No Easy Answers At Nairobi Summit On Countering Extremism

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:09 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Teens Make Film In Broken English To Explain Why They'll Fail English

Screengrab from the film, Present Tense.

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 2:14 pm

Two minutes into Present Tense, a short film made by three high school students in a fishing village in the East African island of Zanzibar, a set of subtitles lay out their mission:

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Parallels
5:20 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

The Trouble That's Brewing In Burundi

The coffin of Theogene Niyondiko, who was shot dead by police during an opposition demonstration last Friday, is carried in Burundi's capital Bujumbura on Tuesday. Protesters have been demonstrating against President Pierre Nkurunziza, who plans to run for a third term next month.
Gildas Ngingo AP

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 12:35 am

Hundreds of mourners in Burundi spilled out of a funeral service Tuesday at a Catholic church, their hands raised and their palms open in what is now a global meme against police violence.

They were there to mourn an engineering student, Theogene Niyondiko, 28. He was shot last Friday by police during a protest against President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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All Tech Considered
3:47 am
Wed June 3, 2015

A Taxi App Aims To Build Trust Where Crime Is High

Traffic stands still in Nairobi. People in Kenya's capital don't like getting into cabs driven by strangers. They prefer to call drivers they know or who their friends recommend.
Goran Tomasevic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed June 3, 2015 7:59 am

It's a problem in a taxi economy if people don't like getting into cabs that are driven by strangers. A cab driver is a stranger almost by definition. But in the high-crime city of Nairobi, Kenya, people prefer to call up drivers they know or who their friends recommend.

An American named Jason Eisen spent years in Nairobi as a consultant until he had his big idea. He built an app that doesn't just tell you which taxis are close by, like Uber does. It also assigns the driver a trust score, by scouring riders' contacts and social media.

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NPR Story
7:35 am
Sun May 31, 2015

Can Kenya Convince Somali Refugees To Head Home?

Originally published on Sun May 31, 2015 12:12 pm

Kenya wants to close the sprawling refugee camp on its border with Somalia. But the UN says it will do so only if residents leave voluntarily. One man has been tapped to help the refugees return home. This story first aired on Morning Edition on May 28.

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Goats and Soda
3:30 am
Thu May 28, 2015

How The World's Largest Refugee Camp Remade A Generation Of Somalis

Somali children dance in the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya.
Fairfax Media Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 31, 2015 7:59 am

The world's largest refugee camp is also a giant social experiment.

Take hundreds of thousands of Somalis fleeing a war. Shelter them for 24 years in a camp in Kenya run by the United Nations. And offer different opportunities than they might have had if they'd stayed in Somalia.

The Kenyan government wants the experiment to end — soon. It's pushing the refugees to return to their home in Somalia, though the camp called Dadaab is the only home many have known.

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Goats and Soda
4:33 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Blind Waiters Give Diners A Taste Of 'Dinner In The Dark' In Kenya

At the "Dinner in the Dark" restaurant that's just opened in Nairobi, a blind waiter leads guests to their table. The photo was taken during a training session — that's why the lights are on.
Courtesy of is Eatout.co.ke

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 2:07 pm

Ignatius Agon practices his greeting: "OK, good evening ladies and gentlemen. My name is Ignatius and I am going to guide you into the dark."

It's Monday, and the first day of training for a new restaurant opening this month in Kenya. Diners will be served in the dark. They'll have to find their food with their forks and eat it in a pitch black room.

And the waiters are blind.

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Africa
5:13 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Army General Overthrows President Of Burundi In Apparent Coup

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 6:56 pm

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Middle East
7:37 am
Sat May 9, 2015

Americans Among The Many Families Escaping Chaos In Yemen

The Amiri Red Sea was one of many boats ferrying refugees, including some Americans, escaping fighting in Yemen to nearby Djibouti, across the Gulf.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 4:14 pm

Traveling with the State Department in Africa, you feel like you're traveling in countries without people. Traffic-clogged roads are cleared in advance by security services. The two-hour drive from downtown Nairobi to the airport takes a beautiful 12 minutes.

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Africa
10:22 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Unannounced And Unprecedented: Kerry Makes A Stop In Somalia

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 11:18 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This next story will test the ability of the British to keep calm and carry on.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

London is the home of a new work of art. It is part of a competition.

INSKEEP: It's outdoors.

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Africa
4:31 pm
Mon May 4, 2015

Kenya Pushes For Close Of Word's Largest Refugee Camp

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 2:02 am

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