Kaomi Goetz

Kaomi is an award-winning journalist whose love for telling stories began during her childhood in Minnesota, where she spent countless hours writing and illustrating "books" with reams of paper requested from her parents. These days, her focus is decidedly on non-fiction, believing that some of the best stories to be told are true. Her work for the WSHU Public Radio Group is foused on Fairfield County, but she is heard regularly on all of our frequencies as well as on NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  She's also reported for Planet Money, The World, Marketplace, Latino USA and WNYC's Studio 360. Kaomi is a graduate of Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Business
5:03 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Black Market Tobacco Sales Hurt New York Businesses

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 11:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When CVS announced it would stop selling tobacco products later this year, industry experts predicted that other drugstore chains might follow suit - which makes you wonder if this means more business for other places that sell cigarettes.

Reporter Kaomi Goetz checked in with some of the grocery stores, newsstands and other small shops in New York City.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHATTER)

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Around the Nation
5:04 am
Tue December 31, 2013

Connecticut Plagued By Soaring Foreclosure Rate

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. We're seeing more signs of recovery in the housing market. Last month, foreclosure filings dropped to their lowest levels since the housing crisis hit in 2007. And overall home prices are up nationwide. But recovery is not the narrative everywhere. In some states like Connecticut, foreclosures in 2013 have been up significantly over the year before.

Reporter Kaomi Goetz of member station WSHU has the story.

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Business
4:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Post Hurricane Sandy: Architects Face Increased Legal Risks

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:52 am

It's been nearly 10 months since Superstorm Sandy hit the Northeast — and coastal communities are still trying to rebuild. Many homeowners are turning to building professionals to reduce the risk of future floods. But in doing so, architects and designers may be exposing themselves to legal risk.