Linton Weeks

Linton Weeks joined NPR in the summer of 2008, as its national correspondent for Digital News. He immediately hit the campaign trail, covering the Democratic and Republican National Conventions; fact-checking the debates; and exploring the candidates, the issues and the electorate.

Weeks is originally from Tennessee, and graduated from Rhodes College in 1976. He was the founding editor of Southern Magazine in 1986. The magazine was bought — and crushed — in 1989 by Time-Warner. In 1990, he was named managing editor of The Washington Post's Sunday magazine. Four years later, he became the first director of the newspaper's website, Washingtonpost.com. From 1995 until 2008, he was a staff writer in the Style section of The Washington Post.

He currently lives in a suburb of Washington with the artist Jan Taylor Weeks. In 2009, they created The Stone and Holt Weeks Foundation to honor their beloved sons.

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The Protojournalist
11:17 am
Tue April 29, 2014

A Life Story In 6 Songs — Part 3

Erica Werner and Perry, the parrot
Erica Werner

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:50 pm

To a lot of us, music is essential. So are animals. Often the two coincide, as we discovered when we asked people to Tell Us The 6 Songs Of Your Life.

For folks of a certain age, How Much Is That Doggy in the Window? is the first song they remember. Cat lovers cite Our House by Crosby, Stills and Nash, which refers to "two cats in the yard." The Bob Marley song Three Little Birds is a favorite of many.

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The Protojournalist
3:33 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Keeping An Eye On The KKK

CHRIS KNIGHT ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 6:48 am

Just when you think the Ku Klux Klan – with its sordid history of racism and violence – is a thing of the past, it rears its ugly, white-sheet-hooded head.

In the aftermath of the tragic killings at Jewish Community Centers in Kansas City on April 13 – and reports that the accused gunman belonged to a KKK group in North Carolina – you wanted to see if there is other news about the KKK in contemporary America.

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The Protojournalist
11:20 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Tweet Suits: Social Media And The Law

Levent Konuk istockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 9:29 am

In the past several years, as more and more people are connected through more and more social media, the idea of turning personal grievances into class actions has been popping up, well, more and more.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Google Frecking: The Week In Pandas

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 9:30 am

What a week it's been for giant pandas. We know because for the past seven days, we have been Google Frecking for pandas.

Google Frecking is an info-gathering game we devised — at the suggestion of our creative editor — for drilling a little deeper into a subject that intrigues us. In this case: pandas.

Last weekend we set up a Google Alert for pandas. We directed Google to send us news about pandas "when it happens" and we asked for "all results."

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The Protojournalist
11:35 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Art In A Jar: A Puzzle In Blue, Yellow And Shred

Jim Tuttle npr

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 1:11 pm

The Puzzle

The challenge: Guess the masterpiece — by looking at its pieces — in the jar.

Can you identify a great painting by a random arrangement of details? Can you find the whole not in the sum of the parts, but in some of the parts?

Please post your guesses in the comment section.

The Idea

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Grumpy Point: When A Man Turns 70

istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 10:39 am

The approximate moment when grumpiness kicks in for men, according to a recently released report, is around age 70.

Then you'd better get off his lawn.

Researchers found that as men grow older — from, say, 50 on — they have fewer obstacles and annoyances to worry about in life and, furthermore, they are more equipped to deal with adversity. But around age 70, life — or at least the perception of happiness — begins to go downhill.

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The Protojournalist
11:19 am
Fri April 11, 2014

4 Strange Sports In America's Past

IFP istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 10:39 am

In recent pursuits, we have come upon accounts of once-practiced — and somewhat, shall we say, curious — sports that have long since faded into obscurity.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Truth-Seeking In The Age Of Speculation

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 10:38 am

The marvel-filled Information Age is also turning out to be the muddled-up Epoch of Conjecture. The Era of Error.

Seemingly, we know everything. What is not in Wikipedia can be found through Google. And what Google can't scrape up, the National Security Agency — or international hackers — can. Through crowdsourcing, we can solve crimes and answer questions.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Tue April 1, 2014

5 April Fools' Pranks Gone Bad

Yanik Chauvin istockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 7:25 pm

Perhaps in a calmer, more innocent era — if there ever was such a thing — April Fools' jokes made more sense. Nowadays the world seems overrun with Impractical Jokers, Crank Yankers and Ali G-type tricksters. And gags that once might have made us smile make us just, well, gag.

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The Protojournalist
7:13 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Vladimir Putin Is Right Out Of A Russian Novel

Russian President Vladimir Putin stands in the shadow of the Fyodor Dostoyevsky monument in Dresden, Germany, 2006.
SEBASTIAN WILLNOW AFP/Getty Images

"Russia is a hypothetical culture. Ruled by despots for most of our history, we are used to living in fiction rather than reality," writes Nina L. Khrushcheva, who teaches international affairs at The New School. She is also the great granddaughter of the late communist leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Wed March 26, 2014

What Winter Will Be Like In 100 Years

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 5:57 pm

One of the upsides to the seemingly endless winter of 2014 was that you had time to think.

And to ask futuristic questions, such as: What will the American Winter of 2114 be like?

Here are some of the answers.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Tue March 25, 2014

A Life Story In 6 Songs — Part 2

Laura Thompson

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 5:39 pm

Sifting through the hundreds and hundreds of replies to NPR's request — Tell Us The 6 Songs Of Your Life — we rediscover just how meaningful music can be in our lives, and the supermagical powers that some songs possess.

I Want To Hold Your Hand, for example ...

  • The song "ties into 7th grade mixers," recalls Leon Ritter, 62, of Indiana, and the "realization that girls weren't yucky."
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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Sat March 22, 2014

American Libraries Learn To Read Teenagers

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 5:12 pm

Way, way back in the 20th century, American teenagers turned to the local public library as a great good place to hang out. It was a hotspot for meeting up, and sharing thoughts with, other like-minded people – in books and in the flesh. It was a wormhole in the universe that gave us tunnels into the past and into the future. It was a quiet spot in an ever-noisier world.

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The Protojournalist
1:11 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Forget Speed-Reading. Here's Speed-Writing

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:43 am

Speed-reading all rage. Suddenly many speed-reading apps. Spritz. Spreeder. Others.

Some inspired by method RSVP — rapid serial visual presentation.

"Rather than read words

from left to right,"

says Marc Slater, managing director of Spreeder parent company eReflect.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Thu March 13, 2014

FootGolf: A New Sport Explored In 19 Questions

A FootGolfer, in argyle socks.
Courtesy of the AFGL

Springtime. And our thoughts turn to Augusta and lush green courses and a tradition unlike any other.

No not The Masters tournament — FootGolf.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Mon March 10, 2014

I Just Hate Rants

istockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 6:18 am

I hate rants.

I can't stand it when people spew and spit and spout off. I hate when folks fume and fulminate. I hate when people go on and on about what they hate, especially superficial problems

* Like when you have to wash all the food off your plate before putting it in a dishwasher – a machine allegedly designed to keep you from having to wash all the food off your plate.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Fri March 7, 2014

The Elegant Secrets Of Flying Snakes

Paradise flying snake.
Courtesy of Jake Socha

Flying snakes are mysterious. How do they soar? Without wings or other helpful appendages, how do they glide from tree to tree?

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The Protojournalist
11:15 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Hemingway Doesn't Always Live Up To His Code

An undated portrait of Ernest Hemingway in Cuba.
COPYRIGHT Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 7:24 pm

The air was clear. Our prose was not.

We remembered what Scott had told us about a clean, well-designed place called Future of Storytelling. Scott said we could learn from it. He was right and it was good.

Through the website, we discovered the Hemingway App.

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The Protojournalist
11:44 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Climate Strange: 5 Monster March Snowstorms

Snow plows in Manhattan during the blizzard of 1993.
Bill Turnbull NY Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 3:56 pm

For much of the nation, March has come in with a leonine roar.

Are these late-season snow shows examples of climate change? "No," says weather historian Jim Fleming of Colby College. "The polar vortex is a natural and variable stratospheric event. One of its anomalies hit Russia and Central Europe in winters past. This year it is our turn."

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Sat March 1, 2014

3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere

An artist's sketch of the revamped I-10/Claiborne Overpass in New Orleans.
CNU

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 9:00 am

When I was growing up in Memphis in the 1960s, the Feds — and state and local officials — unveiled plans to build a short stretch of Interstate 40 to connect East Memphis with downtown.

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